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UPTIME - Performance-based funding for rural water in Africa - Shared screen with speaker view
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
21:30
Could you please post the link to the report in the chat box?
Johanna Koehler
23:31
https://www.smithschool.ox.ac.uk/research/water/report-performance-based-funding.html
arco
40:28
I missed all the speaches due to no sound - settings are disable by organizer - what needs to be done?
Tyler Higginson
48:22
Ella, can you please share some links or resources about the Sustainable WASH systems learning partnership you mentioned?
Ella
50:34
Here’s the webpage for the Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership: https://www.globalwaters.org/SWS
Ella
50:56
A lot more knowledge products related to our current discussion will be available in the near future.
vincent
52:02
Hello, I joined some 7 minutes late, enjoying the discusion
pokorski
59:32
I would like to add as a learning the better performance of formal enterprises - indicating the value of formalizing enterprises in Service Provision. The implication for Africa Governments I think is that they have to think about ways how formal companies are able to compete against informal companies if those are still tolerated.
James Origa
01:00:54
"Long-term O & M subsidy should be built in the capital investment by donors/NGOs". My question is how?
Eddy Perez - Global Communities
01:01:33
Hello all: Very interesting presentations and excellent panelist comments. I have two questions: 1. Where will the "sustainable subsidies come from and, 2. is there no alternative to ongoing subsidies? Other rural sectors wtih social impacts have been abel to increase income - phones, electricity, etc. Rural households are paying for other services but continue to spend much less than is needed for the water services
Simeon Ogamba
01:02:26
In the long term, is subsidy for O&M sustainable?
James Origa
01:02:39
Of the 3 success factors UDUMA metioned, "operator contract with community" is most critical. The other 2 are easy. The biggest constraints around this is the political-economy factors that determine the "institutional design and conditions".
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:02:50
To answer to Eddy Perez' question: GIZ has done some analysis on where "sustainable subsidies" could come from: https://mia.giz.de/qlink/ID=245325000
Romanus Berg
01:03:17
thank you for hosting this session and this broader community, knowing that there are multiple actors working on sustainable (rural) access globally, can we find more robust ways to collaborate and help each other - thanks again
thierrybarbotte
01:03:53
To Simeon Ogamba: Personnally, I do not think so
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:04:29
"Mobilizing additional funds for pro-poor water services", a study done by Urban Institute for GIZ in 2018 https://mia.giz.de/qlink/ID=245325000
James Origa
01:04:51
On Eddy'z question-a posisble solution to have some kind of "O & M tax" from every new capital investments. This "tax" would then be managed through a ring-fenced "O & M fund" for subsequent O & M needs...
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:05:43
.. or solidarity levies or sur-taxes, for example on the pharma industry, that is then re-directed to subsidizing water services.
pokorski
01:05:47
Sustainable subsidies exist. Primary education is an example in many places
James Origa
01:06:39
@Thiery.. but the data shows that even with private "business minded" operators, the O & M shortfall is still huge. How would this gap be filled. The data shows subsidy need for O & M. Not just subsidy for capital invetsment
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:06:59
The discussion on "sustainable subsidies" is exactly the one we want to have going forward.
pokorski
01:07:35
i am muted
Igor Markov
01:07:47
Thank you for hosting. This is great information and inspiration for those of us who believe people can actually afford to solve this problem. Would like to see more about the specifics of each model. The devil is in the details.
Jochen Rudolph
01:07:49
From a donor perspective, it seems that O&M subsidies should be coming from client governments. But to make this a condition of future lending to the rural sub-sector may discourage governments from requesting it in the first place.
Adam Harvey
01:07:58
Discussion on capital investment tax, is very useful, as the capital investments made in rural water, wthout a maiteance structure, are actually a burden
Pauline K.
01:08:25
From Emmanuel Kisangau, County Government of Kitui, Kenya. What is the most economical scope or level of financing for preventive maintenance from both users and service providers point of view and what are factors that determine that?
Louis Boorstin
01:08:29
Picking up on the question of subsidies, the study shows that piped water is much more likely to be financially viable than handpumps. Are there situations where handpumps can fully cover O&M? If so, what are the conditions for that to happen?
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:09:20
Duncan is muted
arco
01:09:29
Aqua for All considers the presence of alternative water sources as a huge barier for reaching sustainable operations
Louis Boorstin
01:09:31
By "finance" do you actually mean "subsidies"?
pokorski
01:10:42
What is important that if there are subsidies, they should improve the business case of enterprises acting in the sector and not work against it. So it has to be smart
Adam Harvey
01:11:32
Payment by container as people fetch water from hand-pumps, does exist and we see examples of full OM csot be ing covered. They are rare, but important examples for soemthimg that is better than broken pumps and feasible if aid agancies coordinate their inputs
pokorski
01:12:26
I anderstand that piped systems in the same areas where hendpumps are not breaking even would not break even either
Fiorella Polo- Unicef
01:13:03
In the action research that Thierry mentioned, we are looking at drivers of service e demand/at aspects of the service proposition that can enhance cost recovery. We look forward to opening up the conversation to the organizations involved in the study presented today .
Ella
01:13:32
Thierry: how many pumps, on average, should be managed by an operator, from your experience? Pay as you fetch seems to be what could drive the recover of O&M costs, right?
pokorski
01:13:37
Thanks Fiorella that will be appreciated
Louis Boorstin
01:14:07
So the Uduma model works better than the others because they have an exclusive mandate from the government to provide water services and to price them at a higher level than for the other 4 operators. Bascially, water needs to be treated as a natural monopoly with good regulation to make sure the service provider is not taking advantage of that privilged position
Igor Markov
01:14:44
Pay as you fetch is transparent and affordable. issue is underinvestment in an adequate technical solution.
thierrybarbotte
01:15:05
To Ella: I would say 2 000 pumps at least and yes concerning pay as you fetch.
Tyler Higginson
01:15:30
@Adam Harvey can you provide some case studies or examples of hand-pump models were OM costs are fully covered? We are looking at what conditions lead to those being successful.
pokorski
01:15:36
thank you all for listening and sorry for connection problems!
Victor Male
01:15:36
An obvious issue is that if costs ( whether capex or opex) are efficient, and low, then the O&M costs will be low as well. This is an area (investment cost /per capita, which should be looked into.
Ella
01:15:36
yup, i figured. the numbers have not worked out from my experience unless it’s about that many and that much (pay as you fetch). Looking forward to more conversations on this!
Eddy Perez - Global Communities
01:15:41
Thank you Rob for organizing and facilitiating an excellent webinar. Certinaly has led to great discussion
Moses Ngania
01:15:41
How do gender roles affect the uptake of pay-as-you-fetch model?
Regina Rossmann, GIZ
01:15:59
There will be several sessions on subsidies and finance at Stockholm World Water Week this year, including one organized by UpTime, this consortium
Fiorella Polo- Unicef
01:16:01
In the action research we are also modeling optimal scale ,
Adam Harvey
01:16:04
Tyler: sure, will email you
Nelson
01:16:06
Thank you Rob
Victor Male
01:16:08
Thank you for the work
Louis Boorstin
01:16:11
Bottom line (and to Duncan's final comments) - one of the great benefits of the report is that it starts to define the characteristics - price, payment mechanisms, govt roles, etc. - that are needed to succeed in rural water