Skip to main content

Zoom Logo

Using Phenomena to Guide Instruction - Shared screen with gallery view
Mike Fumagalli
15:43
Yes the entire webinar is being recorded and will be sent out to participants along with an FAQ document of questions that are left unaddressed or not answered during the time.
Mike Fumagalli
16:18
Hey Sean! Thanks for joining!
Detra Holmes
16:32
A natural occurrence that can be investigated
LaToya Pugh
16:56
Things that make students wonder and ask questions
Mike Fumagalli
17:57
Excellent responses. Thank you all for joining and participating.
Detra Holmes
24:14
I don’t know when this question will be appropriate, but how would you define sense-making?
Mike Fumagalli
26:44
This is a great question. This would be most appropriate to address during our Q & A session, but briefly - it can be captured in trying to identify where students are at along the pathway of being able to develop a scientific explanation for a particular phenomenon. In other words, we want students to wrestle with questions they have raised but also be able to identify certain landmarks in their ability to explain something puzzling. That “sense-making” will evolve as they explore new phenomena and develop deeper understanding of a core idea.
Detra Holmes
29:17
Thank you!
Kristn Rademaker
31:10
Great question Todd, we will be able to answer that at the end of the session. There are some criteria that is used when considering phenomena that we will share in the resouces.
Mike Fumagalli
31:57
Excellent question, Todd. Thanks for joining. Think of the continuum of good —> great as how instructionally productive the phenomenon is. There are many fascinating things that occur in the world for students to explore - the list is endless quite frankly. However, great phenomena are instructionally productive, explicitly connected to targeted DCI’s. The critical question is “Does the phenomena have the ability to take kids to the place you need to take them?”
Farah Davis
32:03
Wolves of Yellowstone and how drastically they have changed the ecosystem
Detra Holmes
32:11
Will you all post questions, because I can not see everyone’s chat
Caitlin Roufa
33:39
spinning in a chair with a spinning bike wheel… classic physics demo, but sparks a lot of questions and leads into angular momentum
Leah Vercelli
33:51
Hot air balloons
Leah Vercelli
34:16
a seed becoming a tree
Caitlin Roufa
34:27
how storms form (doing hurricanes soon)
Meg Van Dyke
34:36
Collision unit - why don’t woodpeckers get concussions?
Kim Martin
35:24
First year back in the classroom for several years, so this is all brand new to me. :)
Rachel Brown
35:52
Houses built on different locations and where they would survive the best
Meg Richard
36:51
characterisitics of life- a monarch chrysalis; how does the bag of juice survive?
Leah Vercelli
37:21
Vocal should come after learning the idea :)
Leah Vercelli
37:34
vocab*
Detra Holmes
38:15
So magnets attracting is not an appropriate phenonmenon?
Kristn Rademaker
38:21
Yes Leah, vocabulary should be learned in the moment, when it is needed.
Farah Davis
38:49
Leah, THAT has been crucial when teaching my bio concepts! “You guys already know this stuff! Let’s translate it to “Biology language”!”
Mike Fumagalli
39:39
Detra, did my response to that question address what you are curious about?
Leah Vercelli
39:41
Awesome! I say there’s a fancy science word for this and you already know what it means!
Detra Holmes
42:08
So Mike, the magnets would be more classified as a discrepant event, which may not be aligned with any DCIs?
Mike Fumagalli
43:36
I would say so, yes. However, I would challenge you to identify which DCI’s that can connect to - thus providing context and a pathway for your students to use it as a vehicle to develop a scientific explanation of something puzzling.
Detra Holmes
44:11
Thank you!
Mike Fumagalli
45:04
You got it! Excellent questions. Keep pressing yourself on exploring those things. Fantastic job.
Mike Fumagalli
48:51
We are doing that for the purpose of the webinar but this is a great question that we should discuss during the Q & A. I think the question is “What are the best ways to engage students in a phenomenon you have selected?”
Detra Holmes
52:12
A network in important, this can be difficult
Detra Holmes
54:04
Twitter!
Farah Davis
56:35
How do we pick phenomena for complex topics that are age/level appropriate? i.e.: Lewis Dot Structures.
Farah Davis
57:19
Also, show we design units so that they can always have at least one phenomena to build upon? Or do some units just not have a phenomena we can use effectively?
Mike Fumagalli
57:27
Yes. Like the NGSS Educators page on Facebook. It is a tremendous resource of people sharing and looking for ideas. #NGSSChat is a great Twitter resource. Visit the web resources and contact us through nextgenstorylines.org. Reach out to Achieve. Each state has someone responsible for the NGSS development in that state through Achieve. They are all tremendous resources.
Detra Holmes
57:29
Smelling a substance from a distance….you bring in a substance
Rachel Brown
59:15
Do you have any 6th grade examples?
Leah Vercelli
01:00:24
Give students a cookie to eat and ask them why it comes out very different than how it went in…?
Mike Fumagalli
01:10:22
Good question, Jennifer. I would describe IQWST as a phenomena-driven curriculum. We are not interchangeably using the terms phenomena and curriculum. They are not synonymous. However, phenomena are critical to developing meaningful and engaging curriculum for students.
Mike Fumagalli
01:11:50
Thank you for joining!!