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Bridging the Gap Between Human and Veterinary Medicine: Different Patients – Same Hazardous Drugs
The 2004 NIOSH Alert: Preventing Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings introduced a standard of universal precautions for handling hazardous drugs safely. The health effects due to occupational exposure to these drugs (mostly chemotherapeutics) are extensive and can include chromosomal and other types of genetic damage, and reproductive damage. More veterinary practices are administering chemotherapy as owners wish to prolong the lives of their pets. As the use of chemotherapeutics increases, the occupational health exposure risk to these drugs increases. Dr. Hirst and Mrs. McCleery will share how their research project is trying to bridge the gap between the protective technology and work-practices used for hazardous drugs within human healthcare and those used in veterinary medicine.

Mar 13, 2019 12:00 PM in Central Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Trudi McCleery, MPH
@Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
Trudi McCleery, MPH has served the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) since 1994. She graduated from the University of South Florida in 2006 with a Masters in Public Health Practice. Trudi’s major accomplishments include the successful development, implementation, and management of two major database systems for NIOSH as well as the creation and marketing of numerous CDC NIOSH communication products and publications. With Trudi’s background in science, public health and communication, she is adaptable to changing priorities and environments, adds value to Institute communication activities, and provides actionable guidance and hands-on services to a variety of research programs and projects. Since 2015, I have supported communication in engineering control technology to reduce workers’ exposures to occupational safety and health hazards. I am currently apart of the project team that received intramural funding
Deborah V.L. Hirst, PhD, PE
@Division of Applied Research and Technology (DART), Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch (EPHB)
Deborah V.L. Hirst, Ph.D., P.E., is a civil and environmental health engineer with the Division of Applied Research and Technology (DART), Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch (EPHB). She is also a Commander in the U.S. Public Health Service. In 2003, Dr. Hirst received a Bachelor of Science degree in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). In 2006, she received her doctorate in environmental health engineering also from UAB. Since joining NIOSH in 2007, she has researched and evaluated engineering control technology to reduce workers’ exposures to occupational safety and health hazards. Her work has included research on hazardous occupational air contaminants: diacetyl and other flavorings, formaldehyde, 1-bromopropane (1-BP), indium-tin oxide, and hazardous drugs. She is a contributing author for the NIOSH criteria documents on diacetyl and 2,3-pentandione, 1-bromopropane, and glutaraldehyde.