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English Learners in Secondary Schools: Trajectories, Transition Points, and Promising Practices
English learners (ELs) at the secondary level who are approaching high school graduation face unique challenges. Curricular requirements including English language development classes, graduation requirements, and for some, special education can create complex scheduling challenges, and intricate accessibility issues.

As schools engage in articulation activities to determine student placement in the upcoming school year, it's important to identify and eliminate structural barriers that may pose challenges to ELs’ path towards graduation.

In this webinar we will discuss what research has shown about the academic trajectories of ELs at the secondary level, including the trajectories of newcomers, students who have been labeled long-term ELs, ELs with disabilities, and former ELs. We will explore structural barriers and discuss policies and practices that may potentially reduce these barriers, facilitate students’ full access to content, and promote their successful graduation.

Join presenters Dr. Ilana Umansky, University of Oregon; Dr. Karen Thompson, Oregon State University, and Dr. Aída Walqui, WestEd on April 21, 2021 at 3:30 pm ET.
A certificate of completion will be available to registered attendees who participate in at least 90% of the webinar time.

Apr 21, 2021 03:30 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Aída Walqui
Director National Research and Development Center for Improving the Education of English Learners in Secondary Schools @WestEd
Aída Walqui directs the National Research and Development Center for Improving the Education of English Learners in Secondary Schools at WestEd where she started and developed one of its signature programs, the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) initiative. QTEL focuses on the development of the expertise of teachers and educational leaders to support elementary and secondary English Learners’ conceptual, analytic, and language practices in disciplinary subject matter areas. Walqui taught in the Division of Education at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and at the School of Education, Stanford University, where she coordinated the CLAD teaching credential. A native Peruvian, she received an MS in Sociolinguistics from Georgetown University, and her Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture from Stanford University.
Dr. Ilana Umansky
Assistant Professor of Educational Methodology, Policy and Leadership @University of Oregon
Ilana Umansky is an Assistant Professor of Educational Methodology, Policy and Leadership at the University of Oregon. Her work explores how education policy impacts the educational opportunities and outcomes of immigrant, multilingual and English learner-classified students using largescale data and longitudinal and quasi-experimental methods. She holds a PhD from Stanford University in Sociology of Education and often works in researcher-practitioner partnerships with states and districts to advance equitable school systems for immigrant and multilingual students. Her work appears in journals including the American Educational Research Journal, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, Educational Leadership, and Exceptional Children. Her work has received funding and awards from institutions.
Karen Thompson
Associate Professor and Chair of the ESOL/Dual Language Program in the College of Education @Oregon State University
Karen Thompson is an Associate Professor and Chair of the ESOL/Dual Language Program in the College of Education at Oregon State University. Her research addresses how curriculum and instruction, teacher education, and policy interact to shape the classroom experiences of multilingual students in K-12 schools. In one strand of this research, Dr. Thompson collaborates with education agencies in researcher-practitioner partnerships to analyze longitudinal data about multilingual students in novel ways that inform policy and practice. In another strand of her research, Dr. Thompson focuses on developing innovative ways for teachers to build the necessary knowledge and skills to meet the needs of multilingual students. She serves as Principal Investigator for the Teachers Educating All Multilingual Students (TEAMS) project. Funded by the Office of English Language Acquisition.