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Conscience Matters: Engaging Exhibit Labels - Shared screen with speaker view
Linda Norris
02:50
Welcome! Please introduce yourselves.
Linda Norris
03:11
To begin, I’m Linda Norris, Global Networks Program Director at the Coalition, and co-faiclitator of this webinar with Braden.
B Erin Cole
03:20
Hi! We're a group of people from the Minnesota Historical Society
B Erin Cole
04:25
We will have 3? 4? people
Joan Baldwin
05:24
Hi, I’m Joan Baldwin, Curator of Special Collections @ Hotchkiss School
Jenna Lemay
05:32
Hi all! I’m Jenna from the Shingwauk Residential School Centre at Algoma University
Christopher Graham
05:34
Hi, I’m Chris Graham from the American Civil War Museum in Richmond, Virginia. I should also have 3 or 4 people here in a minute.
Maddy Bifano
05:52
Hi! Maddy Bifano from the Shingwauk Residential School Centre at Algoma University
Brandice N.
08:11
Good morning! I'm Brandice Nelson, curator of the map collection at the Texas General Land Office
Silvina Fernandez
10:04
Hi, I'm Silvina Fernandez from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in DC.
Silvina Fernandez
10:37
Thanks, great to be here.
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
12:35
no sound
Brandice N.
12:47
No video/audio for me--state computers don't come with webcams, I'm afraid!
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
12:58
i am not hearing you
B Erin Cole
13:35
Our video isn't working well, although we can hear fine!
Joan Baldwin
14:32
Context?
Silvina Fernandez
14:34
Explain what visitors are looking at
Elizabeth Sullivan
14:35
To orient visitors to our message
B Erin Cole
14:45
One of many ways to connect with visitors
Jenna Lemay
15:16
Original owners of artifacts/items
Karmit Zysman
15:33
Other than for obvious reasons, labels help people get into the ‘emotional’, ‘presence’ of the exhibit for those who might be more comfortable with binary receptabiity.
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
17:05
i am deeply sorry. i am not hearing from anyone
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
21:19
it is ok now
Joan Baldwin
24:42
Who’s the artist? When created? Part of some larger movement? Who’s the guy? What’s the ship?
Joan Baldwin
25:15
How does it make you feel?
Karmit Zysman
25:23
Man queuing up to bring horses to Noah’s boat.
Karmit Zysman
25:58
c. 19xxx, some Impressionist artist p that is the know
Karmit Zysman
26:07
Just being hypothetical here.
Brandice N.
26:25
Know - style of painting, medium, scene depicted, id of subjects
Karmit Zysman
26:42
Feel - Notethe trepidation here? What would he be feeling this and what is the artist conveying here?
Brandice N.
27:12
Feel - what time period was this painted in/what was going on in it's source country that a biblical scene would be ideal
B Erin Cole
27:22
Do - what would you do if you ran into someone with this same facial expression?
Karmit Zysman
27:23
DO and feel - imagine yourself beginning a journey to an unknown. Have a friend draw a picture of your fa=cial expression.
Karmit Zysman
27:50
And share with you. What do you two discuss
Karmit Zysman
28:00
And, reverse the roles.
Christopher Graham
28:18
We have two items for feel— First, the man from a distance looks like a china doll but he’s engaged in sweaty back breaking work. Second—the closer you peer into his face the more troubled he looks. Why his he looking away from this work and what is he looking at?
Joan Baldwin
28:27
It’s interesting some see this as a journey and not as an example of work.
Joan Baldwin
29:49
Post to museum’s Instagram photo of themselves at work?
Silvina Fernandez
30:09
Encourage people to think about/ look for our relationship to animals and the land/ earth today when they leave the museum...
Christopher Graham
30:14
Yeah, we’re also dwelling on the nature of work then and now
Karmit Zysman
30:58
DO - were I to continue with my ‘ypothetical’ interpretation I might ask folks to talk to farmers, those working with animals
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
32:24
i am going to leave you because i am in the family of former vice president of avipa who dies Yesterday
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
32:48
later i will see the conversation
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
33:17
yero djoulde Diallo
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
33:50
he was vice president of 2009 victims association
Mamadou Boussouriou Diallo
34:00
avipa
B Erin Cole
36:42
As the sun rises, I wait to find my fate.
Karmit Zysman
36:57
PoC’s last location where last words are written before death
Christopher Graham
37:27
This may be my last room. Certainly, my smallest.
Joan Baldwin
37:57
From my bunk, I pick paint in the shape of continents.
Brandice N.
38:02
How many people waited here before me?
Silvina Fernandez
00:38:14
Was told to sit. Picked at the paint. Finally gone.
kati sowiak
38:40
“Stupid decision” my head echoes as doors clang shut.
Christopher Graham
38:47
It’s morning; feet stamping, guards yelling, this is life now
Joan Baldwin
39:58
I loved trying to say less.
Brandice N.
40:10
It's difficult not to describe the scene--getting out of that "know" mentality is hard!
B Erin Cole
40:31
I love Christopher's last room story -- it made you think about the before and the after
Christopher Graham
41:10
well…. we follow your instagram
Karmit Zysman
41:22
Relate to Kati’s humour - challenging and tricky when describing tragedy - which she does nicely
Brandice N.
50:05
We're working on a mapping the US exhibit and one of my concerns is to break out of the standard "here's a map with some stuff on it" labels we've done in the past. We are also hoping to make the exhibit bilingual, which limits the amount of text we can include. I want to talk about the maps, but also how the process of mapping US territory took place and who it impacted. But I have to do all this in around 65 words!
Brandice N.
50:43
Linda your audio is breaking up
Elizabeth Sullivan
52:38
It's about the colonialists and their book
Brandice N.
52:49
After reading the label it does give pertinent facts, but doesn't give Native Americans any agency. It just sounds like a project that was done TO them.
Silvina Fernandez
53:30
How the Europeans see the indigenous people
Elizabeth Sullivan
57:07
Can you bring someone (or several people) from a local Indiginous tribe or two to look at this story and discuss with them how they'd frame their own narrative?
Elizabeth Sullivan
57:33
You could even use some of their verbatim responses in your exhibit.
Karmit Zysman
58:18
IN keep ing with the 10-word exercise, I wonder whether having a title would help channel the reader to your/the exhibit’s intention.
Brandice N.
59:50
I should also mention that because I work for a state agency, there is a political element which is... difficult to work around sometimes with contentious subjects.
Brandice N.
01:03:53
Your audio is messing up again
Karmit Zysman
01:03:58
Can’t hear you
Karmit Zysman
01:04:05
Whistling
Elizabeth Sullivan
01:04:27
that is....interesting.
Brandice N.
01:05:45
That's such a good idea!
Elizabeth Sullivan
01:05:51
A for effort, but that is really hard to read on a literally reflective surface
Karmit Zysman
01:06:45
Just returned - today - from BA; saw this. Amazing and, yes, easier to read in person. Difficult to convey and present to others via photos.
Karmit Zysman
01:06:50
I wonder about a[eop[le
Karmit Zysman
01:07:03
s opinions of font.
kati sowiak
01:07:51
Helvetica? Good contrast to the pink script.
Karmit Zysman
01:07:52
I find myself preferring the main one seen here - easier to read; fewer ‘squiggles’. What do others think?
Brandice N.
01:07:57
Are there books you recommend? I'm fairly new to SoC so if you have publications on this topic that would be great!
B Erin Cole
01:08:16
Thanks!
Elizabeth Sullivan
01:08:19
there are tonnes of research on serif vs sans serif
Christopher Graham
01:09:06
AASLH did a technical leaflet a few years back on writing 100 word story labels which might be a good tool for this type of empathetic storytelling, but y’all probably already know this!
Silvina Fernandez
01:09:35
Thanks for a great conversation!
Brandice N.
01:09:40
Thank you!
Maddy Bifano
01:09:52
Thank you!