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Allyship: Inclusion and Acknowledging Privilege (Part 1 of Diversity Series) - Shared screen with speaker view
Sophie Nazerian
34:33
Hi everyone! Sophie from Tech Ladies here! Thank you for joining us for the first webinar in our Diversity Series this year. Feel free to use the chat to share where you’re watching from and make sure to follow our code of conduct: https://www.hiretechladies.com/code-of-conduct/ :) Enjoy!
Sophie Nazerian
34:44
I’m watching from Los Angeles
Think Shout
36:13
Portland, OR
Soyoung
36:20
Watching from Barbarian, a creative agency in NYC
christopherguest
36:21
WELCOME EVERYONE!!!
Megan
36:40
A Thinking Ape in Vancouver
Kirstin Saxon
37:12
Watching from Phoenix, AZ
Kirstin Saxon
43:19
yes
Mark Yoon
43:21
Yes, can see slides
Karen Ives
43:21
Yes
aysun
43:21
yes
Amanda Traikovski
43:47
This to me means that if you deny your allyship you’re denying someone’s lived experiences
Amanda Traikovski
43:57
*deny your privilege
Kate Pazoles
44:03
You can’t only be an ally when it’s easy/convenient for you
Mark Yoon
44:10
To me, this quote means that those who don’t have privilege don’t have options… and my allyship should reflect that.
Karen Ives
44:40
Pivilege or lack thereof can't be turned on or off.
Amanda Traikovski
44:58
Being an ally also means to me that it shouldn’t be about you so you shouldn’t be the loudest voice in the room
Karen Ives
51:09
Sometimes I find it difficult to adjust: when around others who don't have privilege, I try to make space for others. But when I'm around others with privilege, I try to make sure I'm speaking out as an ally. But it can be hard to move between those two situations. How have others manage shifting between these contexts?
Amanda Traikovski
54:38
What’s the best way to challange someone who says they don’t have white privilege and then uses their socioeconomic disadvantage in life to demonstrate their “lack of privilege” ?
Kate Pazoles
57:03
I found the examples in Peggy McIntosh’s article to be helpful in explaining white privilege: https://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/mcintosh.pdf
Amanda Traikovski
57:53
Nice, thanks Kate
christopherguest
01:00:20
Yes, thank you Kate! Amanda - we will bring this question up near the end - if we have time :)
Karen Ives
01:00:24
Many minority groups, particularly Native Americans, have been disempowered as people appropriate their stories (occasionally using them for personal gain). I'd like to make sure I'm amplifying underrepresented voices and not stealing or appropriating others' voices. What are steps I can take to ensure I'm amplifying and not appropriating? (For example, perhaps not telling stories without permission--but what about sharing minority perspectives or opinions?)
Mark Yoon
01:01:29
Inviting feedback is literally the only way that we’ve been able to get constructive feedback to happen at work.
Karen Ives
01:03:18
I think feedback can be really diverse. For example, I have friends who belong to less privilege groups who have offered me advice or signalled how they want to be treated. I see this all as great feedback--and I'm always humbled when it happens because it means they believe I can grow and improve.
Karen Ives
01:04:45
I've also been really lucky to have great friends who belong to less privileged groups who are willing to sometimes have honest conversations with me and to educate me. I try to pass this education on.
Karen Ives
01:09:22
Silence makes you complicit
Mark Yoon
01:09:25
Silence is an action
Amanda Traikovski
01:09:40
Yup, allyship is not something you can turn on and off
Kate Pazoles
01:11:04
There was a great article recently about how silence has been weaponized by politicians, often in support of policies harming BIPOC
Kate Pazoles
01:11:11
“The silent majority”
Kate Pazoles
01:11:34
I’ll try to find it!
Mark Yoon
01:12:33
I commit to giving constructive feedback to those who speak over others.
Karen Ives
01:12:46
Making sure that the perspectives of my less privileged friends (LGBT, racial minorities, etc.) are represented in conversations where they aren't present. I don't think anyone should be able to forget or ignore that oppression exists.
Alison
01:12:52
I’m going to invite a black colleague for a coffee chat
Think Shout
01:13:03
I'll be more aware of when to speak up and when to listen
Megan Caldwell
01:13:03
I will confront/provide feedback to the people who hold similar privileges to mine in my workplace about their ignorant or hateful language they are using
Eriol Fox
01:13:29
I want to try to implement this advice regarding people in power
Mark Yoon
01:19:21
I believe the conversation that has to happen first is asking people in power to invite feedback.
Amanda Traikovski
01:22:12
Thanks folks, this was great
Sophie Nazerian
01:22:20
Thank you everyone! Please join us on April 3 for the next webinar :) - Sophie @ Tech Ladies
Eriol Fox
01:22:29
So so so good! Thank you!
Kate Pazoles
01:22:32
thank you!
Karen Ives
01:22:38
Thank you.
Kirstin Saxon
01:22:41
Thanks so much!
Amanda Traikovski
01:22:56
What is your podcast called again?
Amanda Traikovski
01:23:12
Oops haha, thanks
dana.m@getjobber.com
01:23:50
If you want to be a better ally to the 2SLGBTQIA+ community, share your pronouns when you introduce yourself. Normalize this and stop putting the onus on others. Thanks. :)
Mark Yoon
01:24:14
Thank you!