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Supporting Student's Mathematical Reasoning with the Mathematical Practices Part 3 - Shared screen with speaker view
Catherine O'Neil
35:57
Thank you.
Tennessee
36:05
I think folks have to change their chat settings and I forgot to do it
Christina Webster
39:07
My students did 3-reads in small groups last week and rocked it! Our whole class practice has paid off.
siefertc
39:34
My students love this and when I assigned a short measurement packet with story problems, they jumped at the option of using the process.
Catherine O'Neil
39:56
I have had them pair up to do a 3-read. Lots of good discussion with the students.
Jennifer Bleicher
40:17
I have been using PICS and my intervention math class loves it!
Terry Pike
41:12
We have been using numberless problems regularly at the beginning of math, working with partners, and the level of critical thinking and reasoning has been wonderful to witness.
Stephanie Richardson
41:41
I have enjoyed continuing to use the numberless word problems, and I do feel they are beginning to get better at looking at the whole problem rather than just the numbers
Christina Webster
41:45
It also helps lead into problems involving unknowns/variables
Elizabeth Ross
42:03
We do numberless problems almost daily. The students have finally adjusted to not having numbers in a problem. They are reading the problems more carefully and able to tell what they should do with the numbers…
Catherine O'Neil
42:28
My students are beginning to see them as a story.
Elizabeth Ross
43:48
Did Eduardo’s cars with 5 resource kiddos. Made 10 frames that we called garages… Kids loved it
Catherine O'Neil
43:49
Used number 4 - students liked trying to find all the squares.
Elizabeth Ross
44:19
I don’t think everyone has switched to all panelists and attendees…
Terry Pike
44:26
Eduardo's Cars - the students could choose any math tool from the shelves. Those students who chose manipupatives were more successful and could explain their reasoning better than students who only used white boards.
erin.carriker
45:03
sorry, haha! cara’s candy and how many squares
Sophia Armstrong
45:13
I just did #4 today. Hoowee! That was so hard for 1st grade. They did not see the pattern but they were excited to say, what they thought were, smart things.
kathleenkerkhoff
45:22
We also did How many squares. I let them give me the easy answer then challenged them to find all 30. They looked at me like I had 3 heads, but then put their heads together and found the rest
Sophia Armstrong
45:29
I use numberless word problem quite often. I love them because they do seem to think more about what they WILL have to do to solve it instead of just shouting out an answer.
Sophia Armstrong
45:50
Math felt like a silly disaster today!
Sophia Armstrong
48:34
doubling
Elizabeth Ross
48:46
15/30= 1/2 so half of 46 is 23
Michael Hanson
48:48
looked at the relationship between 15 and 30
Derek
48:57
15/30 = 1/2 so.. what elizabeth said
Stephanie Richardson
49:02
I noticed 15 was half of 30, so I took 46 and divided it by 2
Catherine O'Neil
49:02
Reduced 15/30 to 1/2 then divided
Liz
49:31
times 4 to both n and d
Christina Webster
49:36
multiplied 15 and 48 then divided that answer by 12
Stephanie Richardson
49:40
I did the same as Liz
Elizabeth Ross
49:42
12xn =48 n+4 15x4
Derek
49:50
12 *4 = 48 so 15*4=60
Sophia Armstrong
49:52
divide by 4, multiply by 5
Sophia Armstrong
50:15
multiply the numerator by 4
Elizabeth Ross
50:32
30/6=5 24x5= 120
Derek
50:33
6/24 = 1/4 so 30*4=120
Stephanie Richardson
50:35
I divided 30 by 5, and then multiplied 24 by 5 to find n
Catherine O'Neil
50:46
Reduced 6/24 to 1/4
Christina Webster
51:00
30 divided by 5 is 6, 24 times 5 is 120
Liz
51:17
change 3.5/5 to 7/10 then double n and d
Elizabeth Ross
51:21
I skipped this problem. Stupid decimals!
Sophia Armstrong
51:26
I saw that 3.5 is 1/4th of 14
Diana Kurka
57:31
Yes we do!
Elizabeth Ross
57:46
A
Stephanie Richardson
57:49
A
Sophia Armstrong
57:49
a
Derek
57:51
a
erin.carriker
57:51
a
lila
57:53
a
Tennessee
57:53
A
Catherine O'Neil
57:58
a
Liz
57:58
a
Derek
58:21
7
Sophia Armstrong
58:21
MP2
siefertc
58:26
8
Stephanie Richardson
58:28
2 and 7
Catherine O'Neil
58:28
2
Erin
58:29
2
lila
58:31
mp7
f167468
58:31
2
maryann.love
58:32
2
Lisa Varner
58:58
2
erin.carriker
59:35
2
Christina Webster
59:54
2
deberry_heather
01:00:20
2
Sophia Armstrong
01:00:20
Looking for a pattern?
lila
01:00:21
2
Catherine O'Neil
01:00:32
2
Tennessee
01:00:32
2 & 8?
Christina Webster
01:00:46
Noticing repeating calculations=8
Stephanie Richardson
01:01:31
7
Lisa Varner
01:01:37
7
kathleenkerkhoff
01:01:40
7
Catherine O'Neil
01:01:42
7
Derek
01:01:44
mp 2
Christina Webster
01:01:46
create a coherent representation of the problem?
erin.carriker
01:02:47
7
Lisa Varner
01:06:50
4 X 2
Elizabeth Ross
01:06:54
4x2
Catherine O'Neil
01:06:58
Change all numbers to a fraction
Liz
01:06:58
distribute the 4
lila
01:06:58
multiplication PEMDAS
Sophia Armstrong
01:07:04
I would figure out 4x2, then deal with those messy decimals
Stephanie Richardson
01:07:10
I would do 4 x 2
Christina Webster
01:07:13
Make 2 and 1/3 improper
Susan Smith
01:07:17
change the mixed number to an improper fraction
Derek
01:07:26
improper fraction
siefertc
01:07:27
4x2 then 4x 1/3
f167468
01:07:27
Change 2 & 1/3 into an improper fraction
Michael Hanson
01:07:27
change 2 1/3
Tennessee
01:07:31
Improper fraction first
Susan Smith
01:08:22
did not think about skip counting
Susan Smith
01:08:28
good idea
Sophia Armstrong
01:09:05
I like the first one, but I din’t think of that at all.
Liz
01:09:09
the first is easy to model with fraction pieces
Christina Webster
01:09:19
The second and 4th?
lila
01:09:20
the first one
Elizabeth Ross
01:09:21
All of them…I think some teachers might not like the skip counting idea…
Susan Smith
01:09:21
the 4 X 7/3 should have a 4/1 correct
Catherine O'Neil
01:09:23
multiplying 4 across the mixed number
Michael Hanson
01:09:24
I like the first and 4th
erin.carriker
01:09:32
I don’t like fractions haha!
Stephanie Richardson
01:09:38
It seems like all are reasonable, but depending on your level of comfort, some might be faster than others
Liz
01:09:52
it makes a whole
Jerry
01:09:53
the last one is how I would approach it.
Susan Smith
01:10:24
if I can’t see it I don’t suggest it!
Elizabeth Ross
01:10:37
I’d still do 12x2
Susan Smith
01:10:38
decimal2.5
Stephanie Richardson
01:10:49
I would still do 12 x 2
Liz
01:10:49
12 times 2
Erin
01:10:51
12x2
Sophia Armstrong
01:10:52
I would change the problem to 6x5
Christina Webster
01:10:52
I’d still make an improper fraction for the second number
Lisa Varner
01:11:06
I would multiply the whole numbers
Elizabeth Ross
01:11:07
The decimal idea was interesting…
Susan Smith
01:11:14
no
Elizabeth Ross
01:11:18
Takes too long
siefertc
01:11:33
1/2 of 12+12x2
Catherine O'Neil
01:11:34
yes
Terry Pike
01:11:34
Yes
Susan Smith
01:11:36
c works well
Susan Smith
01:11:47
decimal
Liz
01:11:54
I think skip counting would be very accurate for students
Susan Smith
01:12:58
skip oe improper fraction
Catherine O'Neil
01:12:59
d
Erin
01:13:00
a
Susan Smith
01:13:02
or
lila
01:13:09
a
Stephanie Richardson
01:13:09
c
e02228
01:13:09
I think that I would pick a for this one
Elizabeth Ross
01:13:10
3x5
Michael Hanson
01:13:10
a
Christina Webster
01:13:10
e
Derek
01:13:19
c
Lisa Varner
01:13:21
c
Sophia Armstrong
01:13:22
a and c
Susan Smith
01:13:36
i noticed that after the fact! it’s bee na long day
Catherine O'Neil
01:15:25
It gets students to start thinking first.
Stephanie Richardson
01:15:42
It seems it encourages students to use what they already know about problems so solve this one
Elizabeth Ross
01:15:43
Well it gives ur structure #7
f167468
01:15:43
Make sense of problems MP #1
maryann.love
01:15:56
Not solve yet but make sense of the problem
siefertc
01:15:56
Looking for what we know
Lisa Varner
01:16:08
Look for structure 37
Terry Pike
01:16:12
#3 - explain my thinking has to start with THINKING, make a plan to solve rather than jumping in to solve.
Elizabeth Ross
01:16:13
a
maryann.love
01:16:15
a
Christina Webster
01:16:15
b
Liz
01:16:16
a
Susan Smith
01:16:16
b
Max Pananen
01:16:17
b
kathleenkerkhoff
01:16:17
b
Stephanie Richardson
01:16:17
a
Terry Pike
01:16:17
a
f167468
01:16:18
b
e02228
01:16:19
a
Sophia Armstrong
01:16:19
b-ish
Catherine O'Neil
01:16:20
b
siefertc
01:16:21
b
Lisa Varner
01:16:21
b
erin.carriker
01:16:58
b
Susan Smith
01:20:54
changing fractions to decimals
Stephanie Richardson
01:20:57
You’re example was almost identical to the number talk I did with my students today
Elizabeth Ross
01:21:03
Adding 3 single digits
maryann.love
01:21:27
In kindergarten, we’ve been using dots in different configurations.
Susan Smith
01:21:35
middle school really needs that one
Catherine O'Neil
01:21:46
We were doing two digit addition today, making groups of ten.
Stephanie Richardson
01:22:04
There’s a great book with many ideas for number talks
Lisa Varner
01:22:11
four different ways to solve 5 X 18
Sophia Armstrong
01:22:13
Taking about dots…how do you pronounce “subatizing”?
Susan Smith
01:22:49
sub-a-ti-zing?
Susan Smith
01:23:12
never heard the word so what is it?
siefertc
01:23:45
I just bought the elementary and middle school books because they seemed to fit with your webinars!
Susan Smith
01:23:48
got it
Susan Smith
01:24:55
100+30+6
Catherine O'Neil
01:25:05
1 hundreds, 3 tens, 6 ones.
Susan Smith
01:25:07
3rd grade math today
maryann.love
01:25:15
hundred, Tens and ones
Sophia Armstrong
01:25:18
10x10+6x6
kathleenkerkhoff
01:25:21
base ten manipulatives
Erin
01:25:21
draw pics for blocks
Lisa Varner
01:25:23
140-4
Michael Hanson
01:25:30
pictures
Catherine O'Neil
01:25:31
I do this activity everyday with my students and call it Name that Number.
e02228
01:25:47
$1.00 + .30 +.06
Sophia Armstrong
01:26:01
In Everyday Math it is called the Name-Collection box
Susan Smith
01:26:04
7/10
Susan Smith
01:26:27
7 dimes
Susan Smith
01:26:51
not in my wheelhouse!
Sophia Armstrong
01:27:12
3(x+2y+2)
Stephanie Richardson
01:27:14
x+x+x +y+y+y+y+6
Sophia Armstrong
01:27:30
That’s HARD!
Christina Webster
01:28:15
That’s middle school math right there
Elizabeth Ross
01:28:45
I really had no idea how to break it apart. I wanted to stick in numbers for x and y
Sophia Armstrong
01:28:47
This is instant differentiation!
Susan Smith
01:28:49
so glad i don’t teach that level!
Polly Rowell
01:29:23
It's definitely deepening my understanding.
Catherine O'Neil
01:31:02
place value
Polly Rowell
01:31:14
place value
e02228
01:31:16
Will need to borrow
Catherine O'Neil
01:31:22
operation
Susan Smith
01:31:24
regrouping in tens
Michael Hanson
01:31:25
subtraction
Sophia Armstrong
01:31:27
1 number is close to 200
Stephanie Richardson
01:31:29
There are 0 tens
Elizabeth Ross
01:31:34
201 is close to 200. Can I add up to 200?
siefertc
01:31:35
three-digit numbers and subtraction
maryann.love
01:31:36
close to 200
Derek
01:31:38
three digit subtracion
Terry Pike
01:31:38
The first number was close to 200
Christina Webster
01:31:39
201 is very close to 200
erin.carriker
01:31:40
200
Michael Hanson
01:31:41
some estimation
Tennessee
01:31:42
201 close to 200
Lisa Varner
01:32:02
I noticed that 201 is 1 away from 200
Terry Pike
01:32:26
I can use 200 to begin and
Christina Webster
01:32:26
It can lead to a shortcut of rounding or subtraction using 200 instead which is easier for most
Susan Smith
01:32:32
answer change 20 to 19 and add ten to the ones place
Elizabeth Ross
01:32:45
Counting up to 200
Catherine O'Neil
01:32:50
Line up the place values
Christina Webster
01:34:37
PEMDAS
Sophia Armstrong
01:34:40
That’s a lot of 2s in there.
Polly Rowell
01:34:42
addition and subtaction
Elizabeth Ross
01:34:43
6,2,12 all friendly with each other
Susan Smith
01:34:47
you’ll have to move numbers
Catherine O'Neil
01:34:59
( ) are involved
Christina Webster
01:35:04
I’m being a typical student…X
Stephanie Richardson
01:35:06
There are lots of 2s
Tennessee
01:35:08
X+2 on each side
Michael Hanson
01:35:09
equal
Catherine O'Neil
01:35:11
Equal is in the middle
Polly Rowell
01:35:15
parentheses
Sophia Armstrong
01:35:17
I think the answer will be negative
f167468
01:35:31
Order of operations
Derek
01:35:51
all even
Derek
01:35:57
divide by 2
Stephanie Richardson
01:40:03
There’s a sink
Elizabeth Ross
01:40:05
Numbers r missing
Susan Smith
01:40:11
top and right are some lengths
Christina Webster
01:40:11
2 sides are the same
e02228
01:40:12
Not all sides are the same
Susan Smith
01:40:16
same
siefertc
01:40:16
It's not even
Tennessee
01:40:21
2 sides are the same
Erin
01:40:21
There is a sink
Catherine O'Neil
01:40:22
not even sides
maryann.love
01:40:25
the sides are different lengths
Lisa Varner
01:40:28
I notice I can make two shapes
Susan Smith
01:41:43
our 1-5th grade books ask this in every chapter
Susan Smith
01:42:17
they make them wrong and kids must explain how to fix it
Susan Smith
01:42:28
she made tens
Sophia Armstrong
01:42:52
The difference is still the same between both problems
Susan Smith
01:43:11
no regrouping necessary
Michael Hanson
01:43:19
easier
Catherine O'Neil
01:43:21
good number sense
lila
01:43:44
I love that!
Susan Smith
01:45:28
it is NO or KNOW?
Liz
01:48:48
love this book!
Susan Smith
01:49:02
thank you
Elizabeth Ross
01:50:17
2 facts and a fib also. An ELL activity
Sophia Armstrong
01:50:37
fib!
Diana Kurka
01:51:23
That’s a fun way to get used to the strategy too. (using it as a class builder or team builder).
Sophia Armstrong
01:53:42
add 2 to both!
Susan Smith
01:53:47
subtract 4 from each number
Rafe
01:53:58
add two
Sophia Armstrong
01:54:09
I added 2 to each number!
Sophia Armstrong
01:54:19
then 86-70
Susan Smith
01:54:30
take 4 from each number
Rafe
01:55:03
having that nice fat number of 70 makes it easier for me
Elizabeth Ross
01:55:13
84-70=14+2=16
Susan Smith
01:56:31
prime
f167468
01:56:36
odd
Susan Smith
01:56:40
both have 1
Catherine O'Neil
01:56:43
both have a one in the tens place
Stephanie Richardson
01:56:44
They both have 1s
kathleenkerkhoff
01:56:44
both have a one in them
maryann.love
01:56:46
They both have to digits
Terry Pike
01:56:46
tens are the same and ones are different
Sophia Armstrong
01:56:47
they both have the same 10s, but different 1s
siefertc
01:56:49
More than 10
Catherine O'Neil
01:56:50
odd numbers
erin.carriker
01:57:04
both have one
Christina Webster
01:57:20
both have even denominators
Susan Smith
01:57:22
8 is 2 X 4
Stephanie Richardson
01:57:28
They are both fractions
maryann.love
01:57:34
both are fractions
Jerry White
01:57:38
Denominators are multiples of 4
kathleenkerkhoff
01:57:40
the denominator is divisible by 4, 2
Catherine O'Neil
01:57:40
both have fractions, the bottom numbers are multiples of 4
Christina Webster
01:57:42
Both have odd numberators
siefertc
01:57:42
Denominators are even
maryann.love
01:57:47
an odd and a even on both
Sophia Armstrong
01:57:48
Both numerators are smaller that denominators
Christina Webster
01:58:16
both show a portion of something
siefertc
01:58:17
Fractions of a whole
Sophia Armstrong
01:58:33
they are all close to each other
Rafe
01:58:35
they can all be decimals
Rafe
01:58:40
or fractions
Sophia Armstrong
01:58:50
rectangle sides!
Susan Smith
01:58:52
flat tops and bottoms
Catherine O'Neil
01:58:55
they all have corners
Elizabeth Ross
01:58:57
3D
Polly Rowell
01:59:01
All 3D
Christina Webster
01:59:01
All 3D
maryann.love
01:59:01
They are all 3d
Sophia Armstrong
01:59:04
prisms
Derek
01:59:11
prisms
kathleenkerkhoff
01:59:11
some parallel sides
Polly Rowell
01:59:20
All have vertices
Susan Smith
01:59:27
all will hold a dog...seriously
Elizabeth Ross
02:00:24
8
Sophia Armstrong
02:00:24
looking for a pattern
Catherine O'Neil
02:00:26
8
kathleenkerkhoff
02:00:38
7, 8
Susan Smith
02:02:20
use counters
Sophia Armstrong
02:02:54
I DON’T know that!
Susan Smith
02:03:15
1 units =s one rod?
Susan Smith
02:03:23
10 units=1 rod
Terry Pike
02:03:32
How do you know 15 is a double plus 1?
Sophia Armstrong
02:03:41
The 5-7 grade question
siefertc
02:03:42
do you know that one may not be one?
Susan Smith
02:03:55
me either Sophia!
Lisa Varner
02:04:03
How do you know that 900 is equal to 90 tens?
Susan Smith
02:04:03
never thought about it really
Catherine O'Neil
02:04:05
Lots of times students say: I used my fingers. I then ask them to show me how they used their fingers.
Polly Rowell
02:04:35
Students will say I figured it in my head.
Stephanie Richardson
02:04:37
How do you know that 5 x 6 is 30?
Susan Smith
02:04:38
I did it in my head is the one we have to pull it out ofthem
Elizabeth Ross
02:05:11
I ask them when they are multiplying (and are incorrect). Kids seem to think they should just know
Christina Webster
02:06:20
I like this!
Sophia Armstrong
02:06:47
13, it fits 3 conditions
Catherine O'Neil
02:06:57
13
e02228
02:07:03
13
Terry Pike
02:07:37
699
Catherine O'Neil
02:07:42
215
e02228
02:07:45
695
Sophia Armstrong
02:07:48
215
Derek
02:07:50
215
Polly Rowell
02:07:54
695
Christina Webster
02:07:58
695?
Susan Smith
02:09:16
1, 2,3,4,5,6…all
Susan Smith
02:09:29
mostly 1,5,6, no ma’am
Christina Webster
02:09:29
10!
Sophia Armstrong
02:09:32
3
Elizabeth Ross
02:09:33
Share, Share, Compare
Lisa Varner
02:09:34
Express it differently
Jerry White
02:09:34
2 wrongs and 1 right
Christina Webster
02:09:34
3
Catherine O'Neil
02:09:36
9
kathleenkerkhoff
02:09:38
How do you know, alike/different, 2 truth and 1 lie
Diana Kurka
02:09:38
This is one of the OPTIONS for the assignment today.
Stephanie Richardson
02:09:40
I already do number talks, but am excited to try 1, 5 and 8
Derek
02:09:50
2 truths
Terry Pike
02:09:54
Notice-Wonder and How do you know?
f167468
02:09:54
How do you know? For order of operations
Susan Smith
02:09:57
8 wil leb fun
e02228
02:09:58
6 and 4 for sure!
siefertc
02:09:59
2,3,7,8,10
Susan Smith
02:10:01
wil lbe
Stephanie Richardson
02:10:03
I think they will be excited about a change
Polly Rowell
02:10:06
2, 3, 10
Christina Webster
02:10:44
Thank you!
Erin
02:10:48
Thank you