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Earth Day Teach-In: Climate Refugees and Migrants: Implications from Climate Change - Shared screen with speaker view
Maggie H.
17:11
Hi...thanks for doing this.
Lindsey Lyons
17:38
#interdisciplinary!
Willow Huppert
18:19
Type any questions you have for the presenters in the chat!
Willow Huppert
18:53
see the schedule for the rest of the teach-in at https://www.dickinson.edu/earthday
Sydney Holter
19:12
Displaced by things out of their control?
Lindsey Lyons
19:30
One that is displaced?
Willow Huppert
19:40
displaced from their state?
Sydney Holter
41:25
Because then they don’t have do deal with them/ are not legally obligated to help them?
Lucas Curran
41:36
They don’t want to address climate change directly
Willow Huppert
41:45
The UN views this movement as voluntary?
Sydney Holter
42:09
Do they fear it still being a mildly “political” stance?
Erik
42:27
they might fear misattribution of displacement, since it’s hard to identify a single event such as one particular natural disaster as climate change
Katya Egorova
44:04
generally when the country of origin is safe, refugees tend to go back, however the destruction of the agricultural promise of a country doesnt tend to be reparable, hence refugees become migrants
Charlie Bossert
50:16
Yes because a decision from 60+ years ago isn’t relevant today and needs to be updated.
Sydney Holter
51:28
I believe so, because they are displaced by something out of their control. They should review their definition of refugee, and they should create some kind of committee focused on climate migration and people who are directly affected’s experiences.
Willow Huppert
51:32
Should the UN broaden the definition of “refugee” to include climate refugees? Why or why not?
Erik
52:04
I think it should be a new category because it needs new approaches. While wars eventually end, entire countries are going underwater because of climate change (see the Maldives) and innovation is needed to address this instead of just the already-damaged international refugee framework
Sara Soba
52:08
Yes, but maybe “refugee” isn’t the right classification considering the point about refugees normally returning to their homes.
Karl Qualls
52:12
I think this opens a legal issue because refugees and the Human Rights convention assume a person or institution as the causation for displacement. Of course, humans are the cause but one can't often point to a specific perpetrator to blame for the displacement. I'm sympathetic to climate refugees, but how does this broadening definition lead to the possibility of similar refugee claims for non-specific human created displacements?
Brian Arruda
52:36
yes because the definition does not encompass the modern issues that cause immigration often political issues are tied into climate change and it was pointed out with Niger that their was conflict that arose from climate stressors. Also, the UNs goals for sustainable development talk about climate action and that should be reflected in the definition of a refuge
Karl Qualls
53:06
Several people are saying that refugees usually return to their homes, but that is not correct. The average refugee is in a displaced location for decades.
hannah cutler
55:33
This idea of having Zoom meetings open to the public is amazing! I am a prospective student joining, I’m very interested in Dickinson and I think it’s amazing that you guys are having classes about such relevant, important topics!
Sydney Holter
56:04
Well said!
Sara Soba
56:33
Thank you!
Sydney Holter
56:38
Thank you so much for allowing us to participate!
Sonya Wright
56:44
thank you!
Maggie H.
56:46
Thank you!
Brian Arruda
56:47
thanks
Isabel Ruff
56:51
Thank you so much! This was awesome
Lucas Curran
56:57
Thank you!
Erik
57:08
thank you!
Katrina Raab
57:11
Thank you so much!
Ken Bamba
57:15
Thank You!