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Whose Hero? New Perspectives on Monuments in Public Landscapes - Panel Discussion - Shared screen with speaker view
Linda Norris
16:17
Hi Everyone! We’ll start in just a few minutes as everyone enters. Please introduce yourself here, if you wish. I’m Linda Norris, Global Networks Program Director here at Sites of Conscience.
Jennifer Rolenz
17:01
Hi, I am Jennifer Rolenz. Educator at the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center.
Denise DeLucia
17:17
Denise DeLucia, Women's Rights National Historical Park
Calvin Uzelmeier
17:20
Hello. Calvin Uzelmeier, Director of Featured Content at the Rochester Museum & Science Center
Scarlett Rebman
17:41
Good afternoon, everyone! Scarlett Rebman, Director of Grants at Humanities New York.
Deniz Cengiz
17:51
Hi! Deniz Cengiz, Undergraduate Archaeology student from University of Rochester
JanetMarie Bowen MLS
18:07
Janet Bowen, MLS; 21st Century Museums Edu. with Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission; #ActuallyAutistic
Mary Biggs
18:34
Hi all, Mary Biggs (she/her), PhD geography student at UNC Chapel Hill
Iveethe Molina
19:01
Hello, my name is Iveethe Molina I work at the National Museum of the American Indian in NYC as a museum educator.
Sarah Shute
19:05
Hello. Sarah Shute, Skanonh Great Law of Peace Center
Alice Wolff
19:09
Hi! I’m Alice Wolff (she/her), PhD student in Medieval Studies/Archaeology at Cornell University.
Shona MacKay
19:09
Hello everyone, Shona MacKay, currently working for the Commonwealth Association of Museums and very excited for this webinar today
Ana María León
19:33
Hello everybody, Ana María León (she/her), I’m an architecture historian and I teach at the University of Michigan.
Benjamin Maracle
20:05
Hi, all, Ben Maracle, American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program at Cornell University
Shuyi Yin
20:42
Hi, Shuyi Yin. I'm a PhD student in Historic Preservation.
Chris Turner
22:00
Greetings, everyone. This is Chris Lindsay Turner, from the National Museum of the American Indian (by way of Canandaigua..) in DC. Thanks to all for putting this important topical panel together.
Meredith Palmer
22:18
Hello, I’m Meredith Alberta Palmer (Tuscarora, Six Nations of the Grand River), and PhD candidate in Geography at UC Berkeley, living in Ithaca, NY.
Brad Westwood
22:25
HI I am Brad Westwood, Senior Public Historian at the Utah Dept. of Heritage & Arts
Melissa Michal Slocum
22:53
Hi. I'm Melissa Michal Slocum, Assistant Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Bryant University, Providence RI
Linda Norris
28:30
Panelists, you can feel free to stop your video when you’re not speaking so you don’t feel so on screen.
Marisa Hollywood
31:18
Hello - this is Marisa Hollywood, Associate Director of the Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College-CUNY in Queens, NY.
Shuyi Yin
31:22
Hi, Shuyi Yin. I'm a PhD student in Historic Preservation at Columbia University.
Linda Norris
45:07
Julia, 3 minutes
Linda Norris
47:06
1 minute
Linda Norris
01:05:45
Jolene, 3 minutes
Linda Norris
01:08:12
Jolene, 1 minute
Linda Norris
01:33:46
Attendees—when you comment or have questions, which is great, please make sure you are commenting to panelists and attendees (not just panelists) if you’d like to share with everyone. Thanks!
Linda Norris
01:49:53
3m inut4es Michelle
Linda Norris
01:51:19
1 minute please Michelle
Linda Norris
01:56:23
Michelle, please wrap up so we have time for questions. Thx!
Linda Norris
01:57:30
Yep!
Victoria Guerina
02:00:23
Thank you so much for this presentation that enlarges understanding of other perspectives for everyone. As an artist/sculptor, this will definitely inform my artistic decisions going forward. And also influence my assessment/appreciation of current monuments.
EC Erdmann
02:02:59
Interested in hearing the speakers respond to how much the issues of monuments are in direct relationship to the western religious canon as a written text that often people conceive of as alterable—like the constitution—like monuments as opposed to oral traditions? (interpretation is not the same for everyone I want to acknowledge there are Christianities)
EC Erdmann
02:05:19
*unalterable
Irma McClaurin
02:06:15
Black scholars certainly engage the language of decoloinzation—not so much among everyday Black folk. See the San Diego Museum of Man (MoM) have launched an “decolonizing the museum process” and engaged contemporary indigenousness groups to augment and help interpret historic collections.
Meredith Palmer
02:07:33
From what i hear, Decolonization among Black scholars may mean an ethic of decolonization drawing on particular work by Fanon, Cesaire, James, etc - that is not grounded in an understanding of the US as a colonized space. But there is a growing body of work that works to bridge that gap.
Irma McClaurin
02:08:50
Many Caribbean nations designed new monuments to celebrate decolonization. So do these kinds of monuments open a different doorway?
Irma McClaurin
02:09:27
It is a combination of bith
Irma McClaurin
02:10:43
both. How would that shift the current protests & uprising to use the decolonizing language?
Linda Norris
02:14:09
https://forms.gle/7dQndYY2aSLjxD6A9
International Coalition of Sites of Conscience
02:16:09
Hi Peter, yes it will be available at sitesofconscience.org
International Coalition of Sites of Conscience
02:23:19
Hi Alice, do you have a question?
Irma McClaurin
02:23:55
Black Studies has a particular history that is different from Diaspora Studies and subaltern studies
EC Erdmann
02:23:59
Thank you for this life giving panel of ideas
Irma McClaurin
02:24:18
Wonderful knowledge sharing
Irma McClaurin
02:24:29
👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿
hamidah glasgow
02:24:40
Wonderful panel! Thank you for your expertise!
Annemarie Hagan
02:24:45
Thank you so much.
Brad Westwood
02:24:52
Yes wonderful thank you.
Calvin Uzelmeier
02:24:53
Thank you!
Nicole Dibble
02:25:00
Thank you!