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COVID-19 Special: How to Use Evidence in Policymaking - Shared screen with speaker view
Apolitical
05:15
Welcome, everyone! Please feel free to introduce yourselves in the chat as you join, and make sure to keep yourselves on mute to reduce any background noise. Thanks for joining us today!
Dwiki Agung Pebrianda
06:34
Hi, everyone!Here's speaking Wiki from Indonesia, currently working as a government employee in tax authority. Cheers!
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
07:09
Hi, I am Plangsat Dayil, from University of Jos, Nigeria. It is good to be a part of this noble initiative.
Mariana Kalola
07:44
Hello everyone! Mariana here, I'm an immigration officer working in the Ministry of Home Affairs in Namibia
Ahmed Khaver, SDPI
11:37
Hello all, I am Ahmed Khaver from the Sustainable Development Policy Institute, Pakistan.
Vania Ivanova
12:07
Hallo everybody!
Francisca Pinto Espacio Público
13:12
Hi! I’m Francisca Pinto from Espacio Público, Chile
Emma Sisk
13:24
welcome all of you!
sstanisic
15:02
Greetings to everyone. I'm Stevan Stanisic from Montenegro.
Jorge Fernandez
16:01
Hi! I’m from Dominican Republic
Tea Time Digital Dawat
16:26
Hi I am from UK
Vania Ivanova
16:43
Hi, am Vania Ivanova in Brussels
Tanya Foster
16:47
I am from Canada
Katrina Palmer
16:59
Hi all, I'm from the UK working for a Local Authority
Christine Welcher
17:30
Hello from Wisconsin, USA
audrey.whitson
17:54
My camera is playing hide and seek this morning.Good morning from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Tim Douglas
18:06
Good morning, Tim Douglas from City of Vancouver here
Tanya Foster
18:11
Christine, GOPACKGO!
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
18:18
Okay. I am Plangsat Dayil from University of Jos, Nigeria. I am the Director of the Centre for Gender and Women Studies.
Stephen Gray
18:29
Stephen from Newport, South Wales
Geron Kamberi
18:43
Hi all, I am from Albania
Vania Ivanova
18:51
I am very happy
Vania Ivanova
19:15
Thank you for organising this webinar!
Christine Welcher
19:16
@Tanya. 😍
Mahmoud.Najjar
19:17
hi every body Im Mahmoud najjar from united arab emirates - Dubai
RatanshiFa1
19:28
Good morning folks, I'm participating from Toronto. Looking forward to the discussion.
Mohamed Aboubakari
19:28
Mohamed Aboubakari from Benin in West Africa, Social Policy Specialist
Mariana Kalola
19:32
It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you!
Bardha Qokaj
19:44
Hello to everybody! I'm from Albania.
Bardha Qokaj
20:04
Thank you for organising this!
Jessica Drakul
20:18
Hi there Bardha, Jessica in Canada here. Yes, thanks to the organizers.
TalibS
20:21
Hello, I am from Ottawa, Canada
Mohamed Aboubakari
20:23
Hi
Hanifa
20:46
Hi from Toronto
Anne
20:46
Hi everyone - and hey Jessica :) I'm here from Winnipeg, Canada.
Jessica Drakul
20:58
Hi Anne!
james onora
21:00
hi everyone, Onora from Nigeria
Sam Cowan
21:12
Hi from Ottawa Canada :-)
christine.werk
21:29
Hi from Edmonton Canada
Marine Shah
21:33
Hello, Marine in London here!
SRichards
21:45
Hi there Sarah from London
Tanya Nash
21:56
Hello Tanya from Swansea, UK
JEMCCANN
22:11
Hi everyone! Jenna from Ottawa, Canada
klyons
22:16
Hi- Karen from Washington, DC
Fiona Siequien
22:23
Hi everyone from Milton Keynes, UK
Bev
22:29
Hi Beverley from Victoria, BC Canada
VB
22:49
Hi everyone - Vanessa from Calgary, AB Canada
Kathrin Raunig
23:00
Hi, from Vienna, Austria :)
ALEXANDER ARIE SANATA DS
23:03
Hi everyone, Alexander from Indonesia~
DiBell
23:06
Hi Dianne from Winnipeg, Mb. Canada
Ritikaa Gupta
23:10
Hello- Ritikaa from Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, Canada
Eleanor
23:11
Hi- Eleanor from Birmingham, UK :)
Joanna Dale
23:12
Hi, Jo here from UK
Edna Lénéus
23:19
Hello everyone, Edna from Montreal, Canada
Sioeli Tonga
23:19
Hi from Noumea, New Caledonia
ALLEA Secretariat
23:25
Hi all, Umida from Berlin, Germany
Ammaarah Martinus
23:33
Hello, Ammaarah from Cape Town, SA
Sahar
23:35
Hi Everyone... this is Sahar from Toronto
Kanksshi Agarwal
23:44
Hi, Kanksshi- From India :)
Elisabeth Moore
23:53
Hi, from the UK- just outside of London
TurcotCN
24:03
Hello! Nicole from Ottawa
Gina Foley
24:11
Hello from Alberta Canada
Katie Cooke
24:15
Hi! This is Katie from the Measuring the Mountain project in Wales
Emin Nawaz
24:15
Hi everyone, Emin from Toronto! :)
Gwen Dereymaeker
24:16
Hello, Gwen from Cape Town.
LATKINSON
24:20
Hi everyone, Leanne in London :)
jlittle
24:23
Hi everyone, I'm Julie from Wales.
CKOAY
24:25
Hi!, Cyan from London
S Singh
24:27
sonny from Cardiff
Rachel
24:32
Hello from Toronto!
VKBADH
24:34
Hello from Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
marina.marinho
24:34
Hi, Marina, from Brazil
Jeff Kinder
24:35
Jeff from Institute on Governance in Ottawa
Mariam Mahmood
24:38
Mariam from Dundee
ASTANIC
24:40
Hi, Alex from London
Shadeequa
24:40
Hi, Shadeequa from Los Angeles, CA
melieha
24:41
Hi! This is Melieha from Lincolnshire in the UK
Ismaila Salawu
24:44
Ismail a masters student in research and public policy in Nigeria
JKATTER
24:45
Joana from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
mariasoledadugarte
24:49
Hi, Sole from Chile
BuckoKa
24:52
Katherine, Climate Change Policy, Ontario Canada
paula.bourne
25:10
Hi there, Paula from Ontario, Canada!!
Andrew Durnin
25:14
Hi from my chilly home office (garage) in North Vancouver!
DHowe
25:32
Hi - from Deborah from Belfast
jenna.griffin
25:35
Jenna, In Swindon UK :)
Chris W
25:37
Hi, I'm Chris based in London! :)
Alan Shapiro
25:37
Alan from Vancouver!
Paula
25:38
Hi all, another Paula here from Victoria, BC
Sapna Kedia
25:39
Hi this is Sapna from India
Alexander Stirling
25:41
hello. here from Victoria, BC, Canada
Muireann
25:42
Hi I'm Muireann joining from London
MACDONJY
25:42
Jen from Nova Scotia, Canada
Abbie Brown
25:43
Hi, Abbie from London
Liliana Monteiro
25:43
Hi, Liliana from El Sal Salvador, Central America.
lin.cao
25:44
Hi, everyone, Lin from New York
Katherine Mackenzie
25:44
Hi from Vancouver, Canada
LVanDamme
25:46
Louann from Manitoba, Canada
Stefan_Serbia
25:47
Hi from Serbia
Shabira
25:47
Hello Everyone, I,m Shabira Nupur from World vision Bangladesh
Emily
25:47
Hi - Emily from London.
cindylorenzi
25:49
Hi, Cindy from Hertfordshire (UK)
Martha Fedorowicz
25:49
Martha from Washington, DC
Leyla Bagherli
25:49
Hi from Bristol, UK
DPOTTS
25:50
Hello - Debbie from London here
jennadutton
25:50
Hi everyone, joining from Calgary, Canada
Jamie Murphy
25:51
hi from St Andrews, Scotland!
John Burgoyne
25:51
hi from CPI at London!
Pumi P
25:52
Hi! Pumi from Norwich, UK
hala alsarabi
25:53
hi ,,im hala from Amman- Jordan
Kabura Zakama
25:53
Kabura Zakama, joining from DFID in Nigeria
Christine
25:55
Hi all, Christine from Washington, DC
Grace
25:58
HI all - Grace from London
Julia Rosa
26:03
Hi Julia, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Lucilla Berwick
26:04
Hi all, Lucy from London
pierreseguin
26:05
Hi Pierre Seguin from Ottawa Canada
Suzainur K A Rahman
26:05
Hi all. Suze here from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
John Moreau
26:07
Hello from John in Vancouver...
TAMB
26:09
Hi there is Hollman from Bogotá Colombia
Lauren Forbes
26:17
Hello--Lauren in Baltimore, MD here!
LANAKAMU
26:18
Hi all, Lisa from Victoria, BC, Canada
FJeffries
26:19
Fiona from Brandon Canada
FIslam
26:32
Faisal Islam from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Also a former UK civil servant.
OrlaCarroll
26:41
Hi all, Orla joining from Ireland
Shawn McGuirk
26:46
Hi, Shawn McGuirk joining from Ottawa, Canada
simonepiuri
26:51
Hi everyone, I am Simone from Milan, Italy
KevinBurke
26:59
Hello - Kevin here from sunny Preston, Lancashire
Ines
27:00
Hi all, I’m Inés from Buenos Aires, Argentina
Gladys O.
27:16
Hi, Gladys from Paris, France
Roan
27:38
Hi all, I'm Roan joining from Halifax (Canada)
Britt
27:38
Brittany here, joining you from my make shift home office in Arnprior, Ontario, Canada.
Lindsay at Manitoba Gov
27:52
Lindsay from Manitoba, Canada
Lauren Nunally
27:53
Lauren from Atlanta, Georgia USA
Susie Abson
27:58
Susie Abson from Welsh Government - Food Policy team..
mariasoledadugarte
28:01
Hi, from Ministry of Science, Chile
Daisy at Apolitical
28:09
What is your experience of evidence-based policy, if any?A. I’m confident that I practice good evidence-based policyB. I’ve tried but found it’s really challengingC. I’m interested but I don’t understand itD. I’m sceptical about itE. Something else (please share on the chat!)
Derrick Z
28:24
DC, Kuala Lumpur
TurcotCN
28:31
I'm new to policy so want to know all about evidence based policy
Isaac Katten
28:45
Hi, Isaac from Oakland, CA USA
JEMCCANN
28:45
I'm also new to policy
Ben Tate
28:47
Hi! Ben Tate, Head of Service Design and Standards for the UK Government
jlittle
28:47
I'm new to policy so am learning about evidence based policy making.
Mariam Mahmood
28:51
New to policy, experienced in project delivery
Joshua Ballantyne
28:53
B
Hanifa
28:53
At initial stage
Freddie
28:53
Inexperienced but interested!
JKATTER
28:54
Im a scientist, so an expert at evidence, but new to bringing it to policy.
Jackie
28:57
new to policy
Joanna Dale
29:01
C. I hope that we in the UK govt use it but it's difficult to know what to believe right now, especially in respect of COVID-19
DeySu1
29:02
Sujoy Dey from Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development, Ontario, Canada
Rosie
29:02
I have provided the evidence when requiered for a research
Tanya Nash
29:06
A/B Evidence based policy making should be challenging- whether you are confident or not ;)
Mohamed Aboubakari
29:12
B
Ben Tate
29:19
I work in the implementation space so work with policy designer
Amanda
29:29
I'm new to policy so inexperienced - but have used research backed info for decision making
Daisy at Apolitical
29:31
What do you find most challenging about using evidence in policymaking?A. I don’t know where to look to get the best evidenceB. I can’t get buy-in from colleagues or stakeholdersC. It’s very costly (in time or money) to get good evidenceD. I find that evidence-based policy ignores a human narrativeE. Something else (please share on the chat!)
CHARLOTTE
29:42
new to policy but used data heavily when working in strategy consultant
Sam Cowan
29:44
many of those are applicable
Mariam Mahmood
29:46
A
Amanda
29:46
Costly to get good evidence
Patrick Corcoran
29:51
D
Mohamed Aboubakari
29:52
A
Stefan_Serbia
29:52
DATA!!!
Joanna Dale
29:52
A where to get credible evidence
Fiona Siequien
29:53
Time is the issue with Ministers demanding work at pace
BuckoKa
29:54
something else - political barriers
Eileen McCabe
29:56
Politics
Sioeli Tonga
30:01
all of the above
Andrea Escajadillo
30:04
I am new to policy
Helen
30:05
there's never one 'right' answer
FIslam
30:06
Conflicts with political priorities
Ben Tate
30:08
Al
FJeffries
30:09
Researchers aren't always looking into the questions we need answers to
MACDONJY
30:11
Often timelines are so short
Tim Douglas
30:12
also challenging to "groundtruth" evidence in llocal context
Marine Shah
30:15
Evidences from many disciplines can contradict each other, how to reconcile? Also evidence is dynamic, how to use over time?
Lauren Schofield
30:24
Don't always believe that evidence is best used ir weighted appropriately
TurcotCN
30:25
I don't know where to look the get the best evidence... quickly!
Emily
30:37
Evidence rarely gives a direct answer. World is always slightly different to past precedence. And different sources rarely agree.
Maggie
30:42
It can be challenging as there will be times when some evidence base is not so well received by colleagues because it challenges their current practice
Hanifa
30:45
@DeySu1 --- Hi!
Natasha Hayman
30:46
Policy making the wrong way round - policy first then scrabble to find the evidence
jonathannicholls
30:49
Something else: as a user researcher, how get the user voice heard alongside other sources of evidence
Ben Tate
30:51
All of the above - particularly human-centred methodologies take time and money
Amanda
30:57
does the data really show the behaviour
Daisy at Apolitical
31:01
What effect do you think COVID-19 will have on the way we use evidence in policymaking?' and then offer some choices?A. It will make us more likely to use evidence in policymakingB. It will make us less likely to use evidence in policymakingC. It will have no effect on how we use evidence in policymakingD. Something else (please share on the chat!)
Dr. Sharmistha Das
31:07
Hi all, Sharmistha from Kolkata, India
Patrick Snider
31:14
Depends for who
Amanda
31:17
Huge effect
Eileen McCabe
31:21
slightly more but not much
Patrick Corcoran
31:24
We strive for evidence based policy making but too often end up with policy based evidence making
Mohamed Aboubakari
31:25
A
Dwiki Agung Pebrianda
31:26
i think that Covid-19 gives us fear, much more fear
Downe Family
31:27
Short term effect (positively) and then back to business as usual?
Joanna Dale
31:27
D. depends on the will of each government and how they want to spin it...
BuckoKa
31:31
something else - could make political leaders more receptive to advice
JKATTER
31:34
increased interest, but time pressure makes it less likely
Jessica Drakul
31:35
Some of us are very cynical!
Tim Douglas
31:35
But there is also a need to act quickly - some tactical elements may need to proceed without evidence
Tim Douglas
31:38
"action while planning"
Dwiki Agung Pebrianda
31:40
so yeah we might end up using less
Delphine Renie
31:42
It will make us more careful. Data viz can be misleading!
Gina Foley
31:43
I think we are starting to see COVID responce become politized
TurcotCN
31:45
We will be need to deal with each situation
Maggie
31:46
I would hope more likely but I am worried of how resources will be used
Ben Tate
31:48
B - I worry B because if we respond to COVID really well, it might make the case for not spending time on evidence
FIslam
31:48
Gathering evidence may become more difficult due to resource constraints
Isaac Katten
31:52
I think it will depend on who is using - US feels like it's going backwards in using evidence in policymaking
Emily
31:53
There is need to move quickly - sometimes evidence is not available.
John Burgoyne
31:59
we will move towards a new definition of "evidence"
Sioeli Tonga
32:06
we're all here obviously interested in data
Dwiki Agung Pebrianda
32:08
anyone from US government?
Shawn McGuirk
32:17
Not sure it will increase the use, but more people will be wary of misinformation, will value more trustyworthy sources of evidence
pierreseguin
32:19
evidence based can be timely. much harder during COVID 19
Tanya Foster
32:22
Decisions are being made on the fly and this may introduce a new approach to policy development.
dougsomerville
32:22
Huge amounts of data available, but skills to interpret it are not evenly distributed.
Larissa Kanhai
32:23
Lots of responses are crisis responses, not necessarily based on evidence but “best evidence” available
Maggie
32:26
We desperately need to gathering more evidence now, and using disciplines such as health psychology
Anne
32:27
I think we'll use evidence more as we will be required to have ironclad business cases for any decisions
Amanda
32:32
Rapid sourcing and confidence
Jason Senyk
32:33
the effect of COVID-19 will be limited to policy in the public health realm
Sam Cowan
32:35
agile approach to gathering evidence maybe? could be quicker
Amanda
32:56
Agile definitely
Paula
33:20
Data literacy is key. Our health official explanations of flattening the curve are grounded in real world experiences. Data + holistic experience
Ben Tate
33:23
Yeah Agile
lgarrison
33:25
HAving worked on policy advocacy in a non-profit, but only in frontline in the government, I have a question ... is evidence ever NOT used in government policy making? Certainly in advocacy work on policy, it was crucial to back up any policy recommendation we made with evidence. Perhaps for us newbies, you can explain what you mean by EVIDENCE BASED POLICY MAKING?
lgarrison
33:27
thanks!
Patrick Snider
33:45
Also be highly aware of "Goodheart's Law" - measurements that become targets become bad measurements.
Jessica Drakul
35:57
Loving the comments. You folks rock!
Geron Kamberi
36:23
How we can address the issue of reliability of evidences in our daily activity and its impact on policymaking
Patrick Snider
37:03
Be cautious what indicators are chosen. If people are incentivized to under-report or torque figures, it's likely some will do so.
Larissa Kanhai
37:31
Sorry, unfamiliar with “clearing houses":
Chris W
37:40
Me too
Daisy at Apolitical
38:26
From Gary: Just picking an evidence based approach is not enough you need a disciplined approach to delivery the policy well. This takes care, monitoring the situation on the ground and continuing to look at what the new evidence is.
Paula
39:49
Sounds like the comms/ marketing people are doing a good job, though. :)
Sioeli Tonga
40:09
Timmy stories... ever all seen them!
Shawn
40:10
The evidentiary basis to inform policy is most important at the problem definition stage. before a policy is proposed, you need to establish a problem.
BuckoKa
40:10
can you repeat gary's title and expertise?
Sam Cowan
40:10
"good" evidence takes time and government officials often are under intense pressure to act quickly
DeySu1
40:26
What about evidence for "BLACK SWAN EVENTS"?
Daisy at Apolitical
40:30
Gary Vanlandingham is a professor and nationally recognised expert in evidence-based policymaking, evaluation, and public sector performance management and is currently the Reubin Askew Senior Practitioner in Residence at Florida State University. Prior to this Gary was director of the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, a nationwide initiative to promote evidence-based policymaking in state and local governments. Gary has over 30 years of successful leadership experience in a variety of public and nonprofit organisations.
Rosie
40:41
One of the challenges also comes when team members change and the evidence is no longer taken into account
Shabira
40:46
There are so many ways we can use as an evidence to influence policy makers
Michal Alfasi-Hanley
42:40
question to Kimberly - do you do research regarding evidence base policy and policing?
Shannon Plunkett
42:59
Could you repeat the name of Kimberly’s organization?
Sam Cowan
43:12
Hi Shannon :-)
Jenna Joyce
43:15
Evidence for Democracy
Daisy at Apolitical
43:17
Kimberly Girling is the interim executive director of Evidence for Democracy, a Canadian organisation promoting the transparent use of evidence in government decision-making. Prior to her time here Kimberly worked in government as a Science Policy Analyst with Defence Research and Development Canada, and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. Kimberly holds a PhD and worked on a number of initiatives relating to global and public health, drug policy and harm reduction during her work as a scientist.
Shannon Plunkett
43:25
Thanks! 😊
Sioeli Tonga
43:54
what's worked wer
Martha Fedorowicz
44:27
could you share that report?
Daisy at Apolitical
44:55
Yes, we can share resources mentioned today in the follow up email tomorrow
Ammaarah Martinus
46:26
Time is important in terms of policy development. So sometimes political principals want to use evidence but short timeframes doesn't always allow policy analysts to do everything they would have done if they had more time. How do you counter this challenge?
Shawn McGuirk
46:38
The report mentioned by Kim: https://evidencefordemocracy.ca/en/research/reports/evidence-action
Sahar
46:58
what are ways to determine the strength of evidence?
Nicole
47:23
qualitative v quantitative data?
Shabira
47:44
both data can be used as an evidence
Shadeequa
47:49
Should evidence based practices that when vetted through an equity lens, have been found to create racial disparities, be used in policymaking? E.g. algorithims being used to assist in pretrial release decisions
Shabira
47:52
we used both data in Bangladesh
LANAKAMU
47:55
The data we have access to is often transactional/operationally focused and often not very useful for more strategic policy purposes. Or very expensive/time consuming to make the linkages between the dat elements in order to make it useful for policy.
Daisy at Apolitical
47:58
From Kimberly: Covid has the potential to lead to a boost in the public’s trust in evidence and science which has been flagging in recent years. It also presents an opportunity to gather more evidence and data that can be used in the future.
Joanna Dale
48:01
what do you do when you have a Government that doesn't believe in the evidence presented by scientists, because it doesn't fit their political manifesto?
Daisy at Apolitical
48:28
Jonathan Shepherd is Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Cardiff University, he is also Professor at the University's Crime and Security Research Institute. Jonathan’s research on clinical decisions, community violence and the evidence ecosystem has made many contributions to public policy and to legislation including the 1998 UK Crime and Disorder Act. Jonathan is currently a member of the Cabinet Office What Works Council, the Home Office Science Advisory Council and the Welsh Government Public Services Leadership Group.
DeySu1
48:28
If the "Timmy" example is a Black Swan Event, then are we going to say no to that evidence as the first speaker mentioned?
Mara
49:32
Re: clearinghouses. They are similar to the UK What Works Centres in that they review and summarize rigorous evaluations of different programs. Many clearinghouses then rate the programs based on that evidence. A particularly useful tool for exploring clearinghouses and understanding the evidence base behind a variety of programs is the Results First Clearinghouse Database: https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/data-visualizations/2015/results-first-clearinghouse-database. Check it out!
Geron Kamberi
49:41
Evidence based approach to shape policymaking process which is mostly used from NGO, think tank and international organizations and evidence based approach to make policymaking are not always the same
Jeff Kinder
50:03
Policy makers don't have time to read the academic journals and even if they did, they wouldn't understand most of what's there!
MACDONJY
53:28
Response to Jeff - govt departments need knowledge broker / knowledge translator positions who can guide policy analysts in accessing and synthesizing the best evidence for the issue at hand.
KevinBurke
53:30
But surely good civil servants are recruited to rapidly understand compex evidence and present it to their poitical masters in digestible formats.
Sioeli Tonga
53:58
boom, evidence alone is not enough. so how we do we convince others?
Delphine Renie
54:15
A lot of the success of current measures is based on behaviours. Will citizens tolerate this or that measure, how do we communicate certain messages? Are behavioural scientists using evidence to inform decision makers, and collecting 'behavioural evidence' from the current crisis? I have not seen very much on this.
Apolitical
55:16
From Jonathan: There are many factors which can achieve policy and practise change: how evidence was used to achieve policy and practice change in these two examples. First, a bedrock of published, quantitative evidence. Second, a campaign for change built on this evidence. Third, as part of this campaign, wide media reporting of this new evidence. Fourth, development and refinement of local, prototype arrangements necessary to implement the new policy. Fifth, advocacy with selected parliamentarians to achieve legislative change. Sixth, detailed work through government departments and arm’s length bodies to achieve scale up.
Vania Ivanova
55:21
Thanks
Shabira
55:25
in Bangladesh we used base line survey data and findings, evaluation report, law policy analysis fundings, published investigative report by media, organised field visits by policy makers, organised dialogue Between survivors(with permission) and policy makers
Mohamed Aboubakari
55:30
Will we have the recording of this meeting
LPhillips
55:34
In an interview with a former chief scientific adviser on a UK news program last night, he raised concerns around Covid-19 government policy formulation, and in particular, control of messages to the public.He said that during his tenure the opinions of chief scientific advisers were made public before final policy formulation, allowing external scrutiny, and that now discussions take place behind closed doors so that a single consistent message is it put out to the public.Do the speakers have any idea how as policy developers we might be able to strike the correct balance?
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
56:13
My
Shabira
56:21
we also conducted issue based research to use as evidence to influence policy makers
Tanya Nash
56:52
How the speakers would use or apply evidence in the development of policy in complex adaptive systems where you have evidence that is conflicting or suggests many different policy options?
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
57:18
How much time do we spend on evidence mining in the face of emergency.
Ammaarah Martinus
57:22
That's such an important point!!!
Jeff Kinder
57:27
Totally agree on need for knowledge brokers, also plain-language policy briefs, co-production of knowledge, etc.
Nicole
57:36
timing in a political is key for sure! Also any advice on good methods of cost benefit analysis
Sioeli Tonga
58:12
cost benefit analysis doesn't benefit all
Jeff Kinder
58:15
CBA: don't put too much emphasis on it!
Vania Ivanova
58:42
what about Covid-19 communication, when we work remote
Vania Ivanova
59:25
ist the information reliable
Nicole
59:31
I agree. As a public servant I see far too much focus on the bottom line and lining up a budget on a dine
Nicole
59:33
di
Nicole
59:37
dime!
Jeff Kinder
01:00:15
Consider the "integration of science and policy" as a more two-way process than a unidirectional "evidence-informed decision-making". Kim's comment on understanding the decision maker's thinking, needs, timing, etc. is VERY important.
Vania Ivanova
01:00:19
if scientists have divergent opinions
Apolitical
01:00:55
Kimberly: One useful way to get buy-in is to identify stakeholders & identify how ignoring evidence might impact the department. Be clear about what the implications will be if you don't use evidence. Frame science & evidence in light of what a government's mandate is. Relationships are also really important!
Sam Cowan
01:01:32
what if there is pressure to create a policy before sufficient evidence is actually available
DeySu1
01:02:28
sahar
Nicole
01:02:36
sam cowan- thats the struggle for sure
Apolitical
01:02:45
https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/results-first-initiative
DeySu1
01:02:47
good qs
Emily Radford
01:02:48
link to results first initiative here -https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/results-first-initiative
Tanya Nash
01:04:05
Sam Cowan- that is a common scenario when translating manifestos into programmes for government
Kimberly Girling
01:04:12
If anyone is interested, here’s a piece in Apolitical I wrote summarizing our E4D study in light of how the findings could be applied in the public service https://apolitical.co/en/solution_article/public-servants-can-be-the-fact-finders-politicians-need
Apolitical
01:04:31
Gary: The potential is there for policymakers to get on board - but it requires us all to make it easy for them by engaging in relationship-building, so people understand what is possible.
Maggie
01:04:37
I have to leave the meeting now, thank you to all the speakers, and to you all, so helpful!
Emma at Apolitical
01:04:50
thanks Maggie! pleasure having you with us
JakobsenSu1
01:05:10
In 20 years in various policy administrations I have never seen "true" decisions/solutions/programs built on "research evidence". It's a back and forth, at best - from policy idea to research evidence/input - to policy idea. Top-down largely rules the day
John Burgoyne
01:05:52
How do you think about the role of context in using evidence?For example, many "green-rated" programs in the pre-Covid world are likely not possible / effective in an during / post-Covid worldI fear overreliance on the evidence can lead us to overlook unique, local contexts
Apolitical
01:05:58
Jonathan: Certain strategies work in some countries but not others. There is flexibility needed, and country-specific and city-specific factors to consider.
klyons
01:06:31
Here is the link to the document with evidence resources Gary mentioned. This also has some of the resources Jonathan just mentioned: https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/fact-sheets/2020/04/where-to-search-for-evidence-of-effective-programs
Jeff Kinder
01:06:50
Do the best you can? And commit to review the decision as needed...
iPhone
01:07:15
question please: public sector innovation is very important and how could the seemingly conflict between evidence based policy and an innovation based approach which often sees failures
Tanya Nash
01:07:19
Covid-19 is creating new futures for people and countries- what approach should we take to evidence in policy making that is futures focused?
Rob Sharp SBC
01:07:38
What areas of evidence should policy makers be focusing on now to help inform the drive for recovery post COVID19? What evidence could be used to encourage policy makers to think beyond the immediate at such an intense time?
Apolitical
01:07:45
Jonathan: There are situations where there aren't any randomised trials or experiments - you have to make a reasoned decision based on the information available. Sometimes, that means doing nothing, as politically difficult as that may be.
Dana Chisnell
01:08:57
What if you did human-centered policy design, and used that to inform your policy design — so you knew you were solving the right problem to begin with?
LANAKAMU
01:10:53
Also really important to carefully and specifically define the research questions and who gets invited to provide input.It is so important to include users in ways that are appropriate to their experience. Justice systems have traditionally relied on judges and senior lawyers as the definers of truth.
Sioeli Tonga
01:10:55
there often is much appetite to failure in policy decisions.
Apolitical
01:11:29
Kimberly: People often expect science to have the obvious answer - but scientists need to be more clear about science being an iterative process. Like innovation, science is a series of failures and continuous development.
Amanda
01:11:43
yes - if industry/business use human centred approaches to designing products and services for the public to use and consume - why not use human centred policy design ??
Meghan Chen
01:12:14
How do we communicate how science is iterative, and sometimes and exercise in failure, when there is already such low public understanding and public trust in science? Not to mention a lack a trust in public policy?
LANAKAMU
01:12:22
Yes and communicating the process and managing expectations for our leaders.
Kevin Burke
01:12:36
The results of scientific research are often based on a set of assumptions - these assumptions can have a massive effect on the results. And can be challenged - weakening the percieved 'correctness' of the science.
Apolitical
01:13:04
Jonathan: Systematic reviews & meta-analyses can be useful for figuring out if an approach works or if it doesn't.
JakobsenSu1
01:13:08
any experience with Systematic Reviews in the social sciences? I.e., using policy research articles for carrying out systematic reviews ...
Sam Cowan
01:13:57
Good question Meghan
Jeff Kinder
01:14:15
There is a role for bodies such as the Council of Canadian Academies or other national academies to do the synthesis of the state of knowledge behind policy questions...
Apolitical
01:15:07
Gary: A lot of policy questions fundamentally get down to value choices, not just scientific evidence choices. We can say 'if you want to go down x path, here is what you should think about'. It might not be a yes/no answer, but it ensures that policymakers are informed. (Evidence-informed policymaking rather than evidence-based policymaking)
Dana Chisnell
01:15:09
Where do ethics come into the discussion of possibly competing evidence?
Apolitical
01:15:50
'Experts should be on tap, rather than on top'
Jeff Kinder
01:16:26
YES!!!
Apolitical
01:16:59
Kimberly: One thing that might come out of COVID is the need for more interdisciplinary scientific research. Science will need to come out of the lab and be used by policymakers. Crossing barriers can be really challenging, from communication to funding, but this can provide a great opportunity.
Amanda
01:17:00
Interdisciplinary approaches - yes!
james onora
01:17:12
well said
Sioeli Tonga
01:17:53
policy making doesn't have the same iterative luxury necessarily
LANAKAMU
01:18:07
Absolutely! Issues cross ministry/topic boundaries and it can be difficult for policy initiatives to follow across those boundaries.
Jeff Kinder
01:19:08
Agreed, need horizontal collaboration/integration across federal departments and across the academic science/government science divide under a broader umbrella of "public science"
Apolitical
01:19:25
Kimberly: Scientists need to publish more iterative steps to show the process more transparently. They should also be putting work into communicating in more accessible places (like Apolitical!)
Susie Abson
01:19:30
totally agree we do a lot to work with evidence "folk" to speak in a way they helps more people access their insight...
Martha Fedorowicz
01:19:54
A helpful resource from the Urban Institute in the US: https://www.urban.org/urban-wire/introducing-evidence-based-policymaking-collaborative
Jeff Kinder
01:21:30
Awesome!
HM
01:21:32
Illuminating!
Sam Cowan
01:21:34
inspiring
audrey.whitson
01:21:34
Fantastic
Paula
01:21:35
collaborative!!
Emma Hawthorne
01:21:35
informative
Tanya Foster
01:21:36
Hopeful
Anne
01:21:37
collaborate
Kristel
01:21:38
collaboration
Christine Welcher
01:21:38
encouraging
Gladys O.
01:21:38
Collaborative
Emily Radford
01:21:39
iterative
VB
01:21:41
insightful and practical
MESULLIV
01:21:42
thought provoking
Kevin Burke
01:21:42
Tricky
Eva Niaraki
01:21:43
informative
pierreseguin
01:21:43
enlightening
Ismaila Salawu
01:21:43
collaboration
laurentka1
01:21:43
empowering
BuckoKa
01:21:43
curious
LC
01:21:44
communication
Vania Ivanova
01:21:44
stimulating
Ammaarah Martinus
01:21:45
Evidence-informed
Joanna Dale
01:21:45
informative thanks
Margaret
01:21:45
Great!
christine.werk
01:21:46
Science!
DeySu1
01:21:48
Relationships!
IvancicM
01:21:48
Thought Provoking (two words I know!)
Gerard Scullion
01:21:49
valuable
Umida M
01:21:50
interdisciplinary
VKBADH
01:21:51
brilliant, would love to participate in more
Sioeli Tonga
01:21:52
encouraging
Liliana Monteiro
01:21:53
The Big Picture
Ismaila Salawu
01:21:53
collaboration
Katherine Mackenzie
01:21:53
Collaboration
Irina MacDonald
01:21:56
Insightful
Martha Fedorowicz
01:21:57
transparency
Ben Tate
01:21:58
Collaboration
Amanda
01:21:59
hopeful
Michal Alfasi-Hanley
01:21:59
very interesting, thank you!
CMARINSK
01:22:03
collaboration
JKATTER
01:22:05
community
Hannah Swinburne
01:22:06
Communicate
Vic Sims
01:22:06
All of the above!
Olga
01:22:12
Stimulating!
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
01:22:22
Thanks to our speakers for the presentation and to Ema for moderating.
LANAKAMU
01:22:24
Learning!
Shannon Plunkett
01:22:24
invigorating 😊
Eileen McCabe
01:22:25
collaborative perfect word
Larissa Kanhai
01:22:25
Strategic
Isaac Katten
01:22:28
Lit
helenanderson
01:22:28
Integrated
Imogen Butler
01:22:39
interdisciplinary
Vania Ivanova
01:22:42
Many thanks for sharing and the time you give us to learn from you!!!
Andrea
01:22:46
being comfortable with the uncomfortable
Meghan Chen
01:22:48
Communirt
laurentka1
01:22:52
thank you very much! This was great.
HUAWEI Y7 Pro 2019
01:22:55
The need for more insight
Lauren Schofield
01:22:57
motivational
Meghan Chen
01:22:58
Community*
Paula
01:23:03
Thank you!
MJEZEWSK
01:23:10
collaboration
Mariana Kalola
01:23:11
Thank you
Edna Lénéus
01:23:11
Thank you very much!
Sahar
01:23:16
crossing barriers
DiBell
01:23:18
thank you!
james onora
01:23:23
interdisciplinary team work
Tamara
01:23:27
Advicacy
Vania Ivanova
01:23:30
STAY SAFE AND HAPPY
lgarrison
01:23:30
complexity
Tamara
01:23:31
Advocacy
Kanksshi Agarwal
01:23:40
Learnings were immense!
Charis
01:23:43
Thank you!
Rosie
01:23:43
willing to innovate and make everything better
Rachel S
01:23:45
I agree with CAMPAIGN
Emma Hawthorne
01:23:45
thank you, really great session
audrey.whitson
01:23:46
Thanks to the presenters and Apolitical
Isaac Katten
01:23:47
Thank you everyone!
Irina MacDonald
01:23:48
Thank you!
Ammaarah Martinus
01:23:49
Thanks!!
chutchings
01:23:51
Thank you!
Tanya Nash
01:23:51
Thank you
Rosie
01:23:53
thank you!
mariasoledadugarte
01:23:57
building bridges
Lauren Schofield
01:23:57
thank you!
Kanksshi Agarwal
01:23:58
Thanks a lot!
Jackie Van Drunen
01:23:58
thanks so much!
james onora
01:24:00
thank you
Sahar
01:24:00
Thanks so much
Rob Sharp SBC
01:24:00
Thank you all, stay safe
Liliana Monteiro
01:24:00
Thanks! Great experience.
LANAKAMU
01:24:00
Thank you!
laurentka1
01:24:01
Have a great day everyone, and thanks again
Karleen
01:24:02
Thankyou!
Susie Abson
01:24:02
diolch!!
jennadutton
01:24:03
Thanks!
John Burgoyne
01:24:03
thank you!
Tamara
01:24:03
Thank you so much
CMARINSK
01:24:04
Thank you!
Larissa Kanhai
01:24:04
Merci!
Hanifa
01:24:05
Thanks
MESULLIV
01:24:05
thank you!
Amanda
01:24:05
Brilliant
Andrea
01:24:07
Will we get a recording from today?+
Emily Radford
01:24:07
thank you
Tanya Foster
01:24:08
Thank you very much!
Vania Ivanova
01:24:08
Thanks To YOU
Britt
01:24:09
thnks everyone!
Joanna Dale
01:24:10
Thank you!
Olga
01:24:12
Thank you all.
Freddie
01:24:12
Thank you!
FJeffries
01:24:14
Many thanks