Zoom Logo

Soul Sisters Class w/Hazzan Dulkin - Shared screen with speaker view
Anna Simon
23:34
If you currently do not receive my email updates about the Soul Sisters class, please email me at annas@adath.net so I can add you to our list.
Marcia Wertheimer
27:26
Long Beach
Debby Bearman Jewett
32:04
my sister lives on Kibbutz Ketura looking up to Har(Mt.) Ketura in the Arava. named after this Ketura.
Heidi Schneider
35:47
Does her name Keter have meaning to her story, Kabbalistic?
Barbara Parks
39:50
Keturah is still alive? Is she eventually buried with Abraham?
Michele Alperin
39:54
It seems like the fact that Ishmael is mentioned places him above the descendants of Keturah??
Rachel Rosenberg
42:39
Hagar is referred to as Sarah’s “Shifcha” - more like a servant.
judithbriningber
42:44
Are you bringing up that it’s a different name but perhaps same person as Hagar?
judithbriningber
43:35
a traitor
judithbriningber
43:54
Josephus as traitor
Marilyn Reiter
44:02
All these sons need wives yet only sons get mentioned. until they are mothers
Heidi Schneider
57:26
The ambiguity is delightful. But I would ask, why would Hagar want to return to Abraham after the way she was treated. A truly lovely demonstration of forgiveness..
Bettina Waldman
58:16
forgiveness or need?
Anna Simon
58:25
In case you came in late....If you don't currently receive my emails about this Soul Sisters class and would like to join the email list, please email me at annas@adath.net
judithbriningber
01:13:50
Hagar is one of the few women where God actually speaks to her when in the desert. So she was noteworthy from the beginning
Bettina Waldman
01:16:29
an odd question Abraham was getting old what if the name was like the number one in star trek it was a generic name for the persons who took care of him and he married one but the name was a postion name not a actual name
Michele Alperin
01:38:20
Sorry, I have to go. Amazing class. Sourdough awaits before next Zoom.
Carol Berde
01:40:19
This class was fascinating, Hazzan; thanks so much. It reminds me that a tolerance for ambiguity is as necessary reading ancient texts as it is living in our present time.