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Transforming Science Learning: Keeping Phenomena at the Center of Science, 5/4/2022 - Shared screen with speaker view
Kate Soriano
01:11:05
Collection of resourceshttps://my.nsta.org/collection/vqrl7jtrfR4_E
Kate Soriano
01:13:49
West 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/1HihmFMlA9eib0s0XOuRPMhIF4-Qyj-7kyA5ykjooOao/edit?usp=sharingEast 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/14vMRtkz691J2U9FTxqwCIGRyScY91NrUSr0LO54O2ZQ/edit?usp=sharing
Sean Ellison
01:17:31
West coast is blowing up the Jamboard
Jeanne Salchli
01:17:55
Can you repost the link
Kate Soriano
01:18:04
West 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/1HihmFMlA9eib0s0XOuRPMhIF4-Qyj-7kyA5ykjooOao/edit?usp=sharingEast 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/14vMRtkz691J2U9FTxqwCIGRyScY91NrUSr0LO54O2ZQ/edit?usp=sharing
Michelle Phillips
01:22:09
Collection of resourceshttps://my.nsta.org/collection/vqrl7jtrfR4_E
John
01:34:27
The water was extremely blue
Nancy Sasaki (she, her)
01:34:31
holes with water
Meagan Sternberg
01:34:32
I noticed the weird holes.
Leslie Pitman
01:34:33
how blue the water was and
Jeanne Salchli
01:34:33
Observation: flat lands and carved cliffs
Carolyn James Page
01:34:36
The water was very blue
Kevin Gaylor
01:34:36
How did the land get so flat..
colleen.behrens
01:34:38
desert landscape with gorge and river at the bottom
Jennifer Lenharth
01:34:39
circular holes, silt and ash layers
Megan Frank
01:34:42
Looks very similar to the landscape in southern Utah.
Sean Ellison
01:34:43
There were very big ripple marks on the ground
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:34:44
little vegetation, layers of ash,
Alison Ford
01:34:44
Steep cutoffs and very little vegetation
Nancy Sasaki (she, her)
01:34:50
upwelling rock structures
colleen.behrens
01:34:51
layers of white ash in canyon wall
Deborah Schmeding
01:34:51
layers of rock
Leslie Pitman
01:34:51
STEEP cliffs
Savannah Ackerman
01:34:53
The boulder was split in two
Tina Hovance
01:34:53
Flat landscape turned into gorges; Not much plant-life on the flat land
Meagan Sternberg
01:34:54
I noticed the big boulders.
Kristi Dragan
01:34:57
Steep cliffs, Holes, Brown landscape mostly
Deborah Schmeding
01:35:02
like lava
Carolyn James Page
01:35:05
The large boulders that were deposited.
John
01:35:06
The beginning looked like waves
Benita
01:35:13
various landforms in one location
Kevin Gaylor
01:35:14
no animal life present
cash
01:35:17
Waterfall with no water flowing
colleen.behrens
01:35:22
cliffs that drop 1,000 feet
Carolyn James Page
01:35:33
Desert-like environment
Kevin Gaylor
01:35:53
It seemed as if the water was not moving.
Benita
01:35:56
were the landforms created by wind or water or both?
Deborah Schmeding
01:35:57
The holes are like those in a type of lava--desolute landscape
Dannah (Dane) Schaffer
01:36:07
lack of vegetation, change in depth in a short distance
Carolyn James Page
01:36:10
sedimentary rock
Carolyn James Page
01:36:25
I saw it.
Carolyn James Page
01:36:32
They mentioned ash
Kevin Gaylor
01:36:39
I would expect to see flow or some sort.
Carolyn James Page
01:36:48
I saw the layers of rock.
Kevin Gaylor
01:36:57
welling up white foamy substance
Kevin Gaylor
01:37:10
Yes,
Sean Ellison
01:43:24
I grew up in Horseheads
Sonia Thomas
01:44:12
We noticed different things based on prior experience
Sean Ellison
01:44:14
Niagara Falls
Jennifer Lenharth
01:44:17
dry waterfall! how do we define we thought about Niagra falls
Kristi Dragan
01:44:17
Grand Canyon
colleen.behrens
01:44:32
the layers of ash reminded me of volcanic layers in oregon
Leslie Pitman
01:44:34
Room 4 Oahu! the volcanic rock
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:44:34
Monument Valley in the west and large cliffs in New Foundland
Tina Hovance
01:44:37
My partner said the Badlands
John
01:44:38
We related them to things we have observed before
Laura Markham (She/Her)
01:44:41
I grew up on a delta. The flatness seemed like the outflow from a delta.
Alison Ford
01:44:42
The water reminded me of Lake Mead
Sean Ellison
01:44:44
Dry waterfall formation near Syracuse NY
Kevin Gaylor
01:44:45
I thought about the flat lands in my hometown..
Catherine
01:44:48
gay head cliffs in martha's vineyard
Sumreen Asim
01:44:48
Hawaii
Deborah Schmeding
01:44:52
Lava on the Big Island, Hawaii
Catherine
01:45:22
yes
Tina Hovance
01:45:30
gorges formed by glaciers in mountain ranges (Olympic/Rocky Mountains)
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:45:35
Martha’s Vineyard is an island. So interesting
Thomas David Akpa
01:45:42
thinking about the desert in Nigeria
cash
01:46:14
Cliffs of Moher - Ireland
Carolyn James Page
01:47:35
Connected to the Galapagos and how pristine the water.
Kate Soriano
01:47:51
West 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/1HihmFMlA9eib0s0XOuRPMhIF4-Qyj-7kyA5ykjooOao/edit?usp=sharingEast 1https://jamboard.google.com/d/14vMRtkz691J2U9FTxqwCIGRyScY91NrUSr0LO54O2ZQ/edit?usp=sharing
Jennifer Lenharth
01:53:41
yes
Jeanne Salchli
01:53:45
yes
Dannah (Dane) Schaffer
01:53:45
Yes.
Deborah Schmeding
01:53:45
yes
cash
01:53:46
yes
Sean Ellison
01:53:46
Yes
Alison Ford
01:53:47
yes
Dornisha Shead
01:53:47
yes
Catherine
01:53:49
yes
Tina Hovance
01:53:49
yes
margoedinger
01:53:49
Yes
kate
01:53:50
yes
Alicia Nelson
01:53:50
yes
Carolyn James Page
01:53:53
yes
Leslie Pitman
01:53:53
yes
Sonia Thomas
01:53:53
yes
Jill Baston
01:53:54
yes
Karen Pennywell
01:53:54
yes
Laurie Morihara-Dahilig
01:53:55
yes
Lisa Sackreiter
01:53:57
yes
Kristi Dragan
01:53:57
yes
ElizabethM2010
01:53:58
Yes
Lilllian
01:53:59
yes
colleen.behrens
01:53:59
\yes
Annette Tanaka
01:54:06
yes!
Benita
01:54:11
yes
elizabethjasso
01:54:11
yes
Thomas David Akpa
01:54:17
yes
Ann Dubick
01:54:20
Yes
Kevin Gaylor
01:54:36
Yes, we can use these science ideas.
Sonia Thomas
01:55:10
It is a unique environment
Michelle Phillips
01:55:14
Collection of resourceshttps://my.nsta.org/collection/vqrl7jtrfR4_E
Michelle Phillips
01:55:24
Resource #2
Deborah Schmeding
01:58:23
It has always seemed to me that in order to ask questions about the phenomenon there must be prior knowledge--which often the students don't have. Can you speak to this?
Deborah Schmeding
01:58:43
thank you
Alison Ford
01:58:45
Great question!
Sean Ellison
02:02:24
#6 We, as students, were encouraged to make connections between what we were seeing in the Channel Scablands to environments we have seen and ask questions about how the two may be similar.
Dornisha Shead
02:02:27
#1, I am really curious and want to know more
Kristi Dragan
02:02:28
6- students come up with questions as to why this occurred.
Laura Markham (She/Her)
02:02:31
6- Our questions weren't aboyut general ideas . they were about hings we observed.
Meagan Sternberg
02:02:33
3 The video showed a specific area and effects.
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:02:55
2 & 7 equally. Seem to be the most important to me that help connect students with the lesson.
John
02:02:56
7, I connected with the water because I am originally from near the Mississippi Gulf Coast
Ann Dubick
02:03:16
#6. they are able to observe and relate to the phenomenon which will lead to questioning.
cash
02:03:22
#6 - student generated questions can drive the learning & can be referred back to throughout the questions
Jeanne Salchli
02:03:22
#4 it drives the lesson and leads to numerous questions and wonderings.
Tina Hovance
02:03:23
#6 - students can observe this phenomenon which raises questions/inquiry about the science ideas (content) we want them to know more about
Dannah (Dane) Schaffer
02:03:25
6 - Make observable phenomena, then have students develop their own questions.
Leslie Pitman
02:03:26
5 - gives all students the same base from which to build. Allows for looking past just knowledge to transferable analysis skills.
Kevin Gaylor
02:03:27
#3 for me, it can very well be due to a general process. Since I have seen similar occurrences elsewhere
John
02:03:29
1, I picked water with no expectation that it would be important but it did show up.
Laurie Morihara-Dahilig
02:03:30
7 - since the Channeled Scablands were shown to the students who live in that area, many of them probably have seen it before, this may be of interest to them. They can take their family to check it out and explain to them what they have learned
colleen.behrens
02:03:37
#7. Engagement is a crucial access and equity issue. I have never seen the scablands but by asking what I notice or what I wonder I can take it back to something in my experience. Students can choose from their own ex[erience
Benita
02:03:38
#4. Progressions of learning occurred and deeper knowledge was built through initial questions to latter questions. Connections were made with actual experiences.
Jennifer Lenharth
02:03:40
3 - real world place, great details, desire to know about what is happening
John
02:04:10
right
Alison Ford
02:04:23
#3 A lot of opportunities for them to question what's happening or happened to this real place
Kate Soriano
02:12:11
Look and listen for evidence that students have been/are currently focused on explaining the phenomenon of the Channeled Scablands.How is the teacher supporting students in tracking their own progress in explaining the phenomenon over time?
Kevin Gaylor
02:16:10
Like how hey are using evidence to support their thinking.
Kate Soriano
02:16:29
@Kevin - Agreed!
Leslie Pitman
02:16:43
and the teacher is not "correcting" anyone!
Carolyn James Page
02:16:46
The students got excited with the board meeting coming up.
Kate Soriano
02:17:07
@Leslie - the students are pressing for evidence!
Deborah Schmeding
02:17:56
use of vocab
Sonia Thomas
02:17:57
They are sharing ideas in their small groups
Leslie Pitman
02:17:58
referring to prior experiments, showing videos
Kevin Gaylor
02:18:04
They were using a model to explain what could have possibly happened.
Jennifer Lenharth
02:18:07
They made new observations and kept comparing it to the scablands
Tina Hovance
02:18:07
They related their investigational findings to the things they observed in their video observations
Carolyn James Page
02:18:11
Building on each other's ideas.
John
02:18:16
She reminded them of previous work so we know this wasn't their first time
margoedinger
02:18:16
They sounded excited to share their data
Kristi Dragan
02:18:17
student talking and discussion
Sean Ellison
02:18:19
Driving questions boards
colleen.behrens
02:18:24
students using vocabulary in their explanations, using evidence,, discussion
John
02:18:28
They were referring back to experiments
John
02:18:36
They used terminology
Benita
02:18:43
drawing conclusions based on experiences
Dornisha Shead
02:18:46
students using science vocabulary
Thomas David Akpa
02:18:49
investigating as evidence
Kevin Gaylor
02:18:50
They were using evidence based arguments.
Kevin Gaylor
02:19:33
I did hear them being respectful of each other.. to hear other’s opinions.
Meagan Sternberg
02:19:43
Reviewing norms for discussion
Jennifer Lenharth
02:19:51
asking follow up questions to student ideas
Kevin Gaylor
02:19:52
I think they wanted to hear the evidence
Sonia Thomas
02:19:55
Asking meaningful questions
colleen.behrens
02:19:56
lots of questions for students to prompt deeper thinking
Benita
02:20:08
teacher as facilitator rather than providing answers
John
02:20:10
The "board" meeting
Jennifer Lenharth
02:20:14
board meeting to hear each other - Legos - build on each other
Sean Ellison
02:20:15
Documenting student thinking on posters around the room
Kevin Gaylor
02:21:11
The teacher used probing questions to make students think deepe as they restructured their mental frameworks around this occurrence.
Laura Markham (She/Her)
02:23:52
howdo they go from the yes water to the chalk experiment? Does the teacher suggest it? How?
Laura Markham (She/Her)
02:27:41
so with the erosion tables she could say I have materials and then let them plan an investgation
Michelle Phillips
02:27:49
https://my.nsta.org/collection/vqrl7jtrfR4_E Resource #5
Deborah Schmeding
02:34:58
excellent topic that everyone would have experience with. 9 weeks tho!!
Sonia Thomas
02:35:06
I appreciated the recommendation to use materials students have experience with. And to see those materials in a new way.
Emily Smith
02:35:11
it just brings it all closer to home and makes it feel more applicable in their personal lives
John
02:35:38
I don't have to work so hard to try to find phenomena
Leslie Pitman
02:35:45
Mulling over the work facing me when trying to get other staff to let go of the idea that the phenomena has to be this huge flashy shiny thing!!!
Laura Markham (She/Her)
02:36:03
It is important that they have the experience and not that it is just a level playing field.
Benita
02:36:48
students who may not have a lot of experiences, outside of their community, will begin to make connections based on events they observe every day
Laura Markham (She/Her)
02:36:54
With funds of knowledge they have something to contribute, something that is not hard or scary to share
colleen.behrens
02:38:07
THANK YOU KATE!
Leslie Pitman
02:38:08
Fantastic!! Thanks!
Sean Ellison
02:38:08
Thank you
Dannah (Dane) Schaffer
02:38:17
Kate, Great webinar once again. :-)
Thomas David Akpa
02:38:27
Great
Kevin Gaylor
02:38:32
This was AWESOME SAUCE!!!
Kristi Dragan
02:38:40
thank you
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:38:44
Great job Kate! Thank you!
Ann Dubick
02:38:46
Thank you!
Michelle Phillips
02:38:46
Collection of resourceshttps://my.nsta.org/collection/vqrl7jtrfR4_E
cash
02:38:50
Thank You!
Alison Ford
02:38:51
Thank you! This answered many questions!
Emily Smith
02:39:15
This was great! Thank you!