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OCG Introduction to Earthenware - Shared screen with speaker view
RJ Ruble
38:30
try signing out and resigning on
Barbara
50:22
what do you mean by "simplest" clay? (in your definition of earthenware)
RJ Ruble
01:09:32
Is the only way to determine the origin of tin-glazed earthenware pieces of the same period, e.g. mid-17th century, the style of decoration?
Barbara
01:10:54
what makes the white glaze on Iznik?
RJ Ruble
01:17:19
Will these slides be available?
Barbara
01:21:58
Creamware requires cream-colored clay, correct? Was cream-colored clay widely available (geographically)? What countries produced creamware prior to the 19th century?
RJ Ruble
01:29:21
What about salt-glazed earthenware?
austin ridgaway
01:30:09
Hugely, helpful! Thank you so much!
laurie bell
01:30:41
very informative thank you!
Elizabeth’s iPad
01:30:53
Wonderful presentation! Thank you so much!
Dana
01:31:39
Very clear and well organized. Many thanks!
davidhoexter
01:31:57
David here, from California and the US Transferware Collectors Club; thank you for the opportunity to join in on this most useful lecture.
Dd's iPad
01:32:18
Is Cornish China clay still used?
Gerry
01:32:22
You said that lead-glaze is poisonous: is this in the manufacturing process or is the lead not firmly fixed in the (fused) glaze and therefore dangerous to consumers in use?
Charles R
01:37:03
thanks Colin good to see you Pat and David
austin ridgaway
01:39:00
matthew - you are echoing badly (at least for me)
RJ Ruble
01:39:24
Thank You. Can't wait for the rest of the series.
Jacqueline's iPad
01:40:56
a tour de force Colin. Congratulations.
laurie bell
01:41:03
Chinese Yixing teapots are not glazed but do hold tea. Is that a type of earthenware?
Barbara
01:44:28
Thank you!
laurie bell
01:46:01
Thank you looking forward to your next presentation!