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Supporting Student's Mathematical Reasoning with the Mathematical Practices Part 4 - Shared screen with speaker view
maryann.love
34:52
Hello from Erin and MaryAnn in Juneau!
Catherine O'Neil
36:07
Cathy from Tok
Jerry White
37:11
Jerry White from Bethel is on.
Diana Kurka
37:27
We do have participants adapting so thanks for sending the Word doc!
tennessee.judkins
37:29
Tennessee from Utqiagvik
Derek
38:41
7+2(n-1) for total seats
Lila
38:49
4th row: 13
Lila
38:58
5th: 15
Christina Webster
39:10
I would make an input/output chart
tennessee.judkins
39:40
I was thinking along the lines of something similar to Derek, but didn’t produce the formula yet
Lila
39:58
10th: 25
Andrea Colvin
40:01
I thought it was easier to figure out when I took the initial 7 out of each row
maryann.love
40:22
We like the input/output chart
Lila
40:34
I just drew dots on a sticky note.
Catherine O'Neil
41:03
I would have student create a chart to start with.
siefertc
44:40
We are doing te
Terry Pike
44:53
Really seeing progress using the Numberless Problems - students are now beginning to approach the problem with trying to understand the story rather than jumping to an answer.
Lila
44:54
3 reads is working wonderfully in my low 1st graders. I am doing the first read with no numbers to prevent them from being distracted. I have seen huge growth in student ability to understand and solve word problems.
Catherine O'Neil
45:03
I used the numberless problems. My students were able to understand what was happening. Once we added the numbers it was more successful.
Christina Webster
45:08
I feel like every class I post about the 3-reads but I just love them and how they’ve made my classroom come alive during our morning math classes.
Jerry White
45:09
Three reads is working great for me.
Diana Kurka
45:10
We had a bunch of folks doing 3 reads and numberless problems and sharing on the discussion site!
kathleenkerkhoff
45:14
Three reads have worked very well for us. The kids have reminded me a couple times to wait for the third read before solving
siefertc
45:43
We are doing the three reads with "Ask yourself" questions and the students are loving it and 5 students got up to share how they solved it. Resource Jr. High
siefertc
47:35
Yes, we are using the prompt "We are learning to think like mathematicians" and they seem to really feel more confident and excited.
maryann.love
48:31
With our first graders, we are still practicing whole group modeling of the 3 read story problems, but have not yet seen students transfer to doing this on their own.
Stephanie Richardson
48:52
I have loved exploring the routines from the last Webinar. I’ve been using Number Talks since the beginning of the year, but have enjoyed doing other routines. The express it differently went quickly and easily for our large, mixed ability math group
Catherine O'Neil
49:18
I use a board activity called Name that Number for my 2nd graders. They have to show me away to make a given number.
kathleenkerkhoff
49:30
I don’t know how number talks are supposed to go, but we have talked about the many ways a number can be broken up and put back together and that the equations are like stories or maps to show the process we used
maryann.love
49:50
We love number talks and our k/1 students are getting really good at explaining their thinking with others!
Elizabeth Ross
49:57
We tried Strategize First steps- did an activity with 4 different problems and each student decided on their first step and then did Share, Share, compare
siefertc
50:01
Used strategize first steps when students used manipulatives to solve "crossing the river". No one was able to solve the first time but groups did not give up and some did get the answer!
Lisa Varner
51:21
I use both Notice-Wonder and Analyze Worked Examples.
Lisa Varner
51:48
They LOVE Notice-Wonder.
siefertc
52:45
We used Notice-Wonder on the Jumpstart Ferris wheel.
Christina Webster
53:13
My students loved 2 truths and a lie. It helped when working with problems that have multiple correct solutions, using the two truths and a lie got their brains to shift to finding more than one correct answer.
Lisa Varner
53:23
And the Analyze Worked Examples works well with several GoMath problems examples. It is really difficult for my third grades to find errors in incorrect examples.
Catherine O'Neil
53:39
I had students do Share, Share, Compare.
Catherine O'Neil
54:16
I had them do two problems.
kathleenkerkhoff
54:49
We just started the distributive property (third grade) so 2 wrongs and 1 right have fit in
Lisa Varner
54:54
I also really like "How Do You Know?" Lots of times my students try to tell me, "because I thought it in my head."
Stephanie Richardson
55:20
I have used condition a couple of times. It seemed like it worked really well with my students who like to take risks, but the ones who are more tentative struggled more.
Catherine O'Neil
55:37
I used a lot of How do you know? when students give me the answers to problems. This helps me understand their thinking.
Catherine O'Neil
59:10
Communicate, respond, explain, make sense
Christina Webster
59:13
arguments
Stephanie Richardson
59:15
The phrase “analyze situations by breaking them into cases” jumped out to me
Lisa Varner
59:17
distinguish correct logic
Elizabeth Ross
59:30
justify
Derek
59:32
clarify
Stephanie Richardson
59:35
There are a lot of higher level thinking skills used in this math practice
Jennifer Bleicher
59:48
I liked How DO you know
Elizabeth Ross
59:49
Compare two arguments
siefertc
59:50
Distinguish correct logic or reasoning from what is flawed, explain
maryann.love
59:52
justify
Derek
01:03:57
If your friend has a 3 dollars and 90 cents and you have 88 cents and your friend gives you a dime, you still have the same amount together.
Elizabeth Ross
01:04:04
True. I solved 2 decimal problems and it works and then used whole numbers (Friends of 10) and it worked
Andrea Colvin
01:04:05
True, because they will cancel each other out. .1 + -.1 = 0
Catherine O'Neil
01:04:37
It is true because if you take something from one number and add it to the other number it will add up the same.
Christina Webster
01:05:28
You have 5 apples, if I give you 1 apple and take another apple, you still only have 5 apples….putting it in basic terms?
kathleenkerkhoff
01:07:45
#3 This is true. I can multiply or use repeated addition to prove that any number times ten will have a zero in the ones place
Diana Kurka
01:08:20
This is one of the discussion Options for today’s webinar.
Derek
01:08:24
#3 is true as Adding a zero to the end of a number changes all place values
Stephanie Richardson
01:08:41
I’m going to say that #3 is false. It does not play out when you multiply a decimal by a multiple of 10. For instance, 1.3 x 40 = 52
Catherine O'Neil
01:08:55
Conjecture 3 - This only works if the multiple of ten begins with a one; ie, 10, 100, 1000, etc. It will not work if had another number than one.
Christina Webster
01:09:00
#3 Multiples of 10 end in zero so anything times 10 will have a zero at the end of it.
Lisa Varner
01:09:23
#3 is true because when you are multiplying by ten there is a zero in the ones place
maryann.love
01:09:32
Conjecture #3 is true for whole numbers. You take the number that you are multiplying by 10 and add a zero at the end.
Derek
01:09:48
good call stephanie, must be a whole :)
Catherine O'Neil
01:09:56
Examples: 3 x 10 = 30, 3 x 30 = 90
Jerry White
01:10:10
I didn’t see the “multiple” of ten until my third read.
kathleenkerkhoff
01:10:32
Sorry…third grade doesn
Lisa Varner
01:13:15
I think conjecture 4 is true with whole numbers.
Elizabeth Ross
01:13:29
4 seems to work with whole numbers
Christina Webster
01:14:30
After teaching PEMDAS #5 throws me for a loop. Every time I’m trying it, its working, but I just taught it as left to right!
kathleenkerkhoff
01:14:35
#5 since we are learning the distributive property it depends on which operation you use first. Wouldn’t you need to know the end product to know if your order of operations is correct?
Elizabeth Ross
01:15:03
#4 decimal seem to work too
Catherine O'Neil
01:15:27
#5 Order of operations
Stephanie Richardson
01:15:42
I’m going to tentatively say #5 is true for positive numbers, including decimal numbers.
Christina Webster
01:16:41
I think #5 is true for negative numbers too…I tried it and got the same thing. Maybe I need different number combinations
Catherine O'Neil
01:16:55
We all can not see what J Dunning is positng.
Derek
01:17:21
#5 works sometimes but not always true depending on orders of multiplication and division and how many of each operation.
Jerry White
01:24:09
YES!
Christina Webster
01:27:49
Trevor claims that 5z + 15= 5(z + 5) Is this correct? Why or why not?
Stephanie Richardson
01:28:16
Joe Schmoe argued that all scalene triangles have an obtuse angle. Is he right?
jdunning
01:28:56
In finding the are of a rectangle it doesn’t matter which measurement is the length and which is the width
Jennifer Bay Williams
01:31:40
MP4 for MP2
Catherine O'Neil
01:31:56
MP4
kathleenkerkhoff
01:33:04
MP1, MP4
Lisa Varner
01:33:09
MP2 What strategies might/did you try?
Catherine O'Neil
01:33:21
MP2
Stephanie Richardson
01:33:41
#3 MP 5
Lisa Varner
01:34:05
3. MP 4 Use diagrams graphs, etc.
kathleenkerkhoff
01:34:06
#3 MP4,
Lila
01:34:27
MP 5
Stephanie Richardson
01:34:50
#4 MP 7
Catherine O'Neil
01:35:01
#4 MP7
Lisa Varner
01:35:03
4. MP7 Look for patterns
siefertc
01:35:05
7 and 8
Lisa Varner
01:35:25
5. MP 5
Catherine O'Neil
01:35:35
#5 MP5
tennessee.judkins
01:35:37
4
kathleenkerkhoff
01:35:40
#5 MP4,5
Stephanie Richardson
01:36:11
#6 MP 3
Catherine O'Neil
01:36:20
#6 MP2
Lisa Varner
01:36:45
6. Could it be MP1 check for reasonableness?
Catherine O'Neil
01:36:45
#7 mp7
Christina Webster
01:36:47
7
kathleenkerkhoff
01:36:54
#7 MP3,
Catherine O'Neil
01:37:40
#8 mp1
Derek
01:38:39
#7 mp3
Diana Kurka
01:43:34
This is another of our Options for the discussion topic today.
Lisa Varner
01:43:49
I ordered this book. I love it!
Derek
01:45:23
take 49 from 176
Stephanie Richardson
01:45:41
What’s the difference between 176 and 49?
Derek
01:45:49
find the difference of 176 and 49
Elizabeth Ross
01:46:00
177-50?
kathleenkerkhoff
01:46:03
180-50=130 +5=135 (we finished a unit on rounding)
Christina Webster
01:46:06
49 less than 176
Catherine O'Neil
01:46:10
?Can you solve subtract
Jpeterson
01:46:11
176 take away 40 take away 9
Terry Pike
01:46:27
176-50=126+1
Elizabeth Ross
01:48:38
I do this closed task :)
Catherine O'Neil
01:48:47
What could you buy with $10?
jdunning
01:48:57
You only have $20. What would you buy?
Elizabeth Ross
01:49:03
Give a certain amount of money and ask them what they would buy
Stephanie Richardson
01:49:19
That’s where I was headed as well.
Diana Kurka
01:49:44
Yes it is one of the options!
Christina Webster
01:50:48
Yes the kids can earn these points throughout the game!
Christina Webster
01:51:22
Gimkit is great for earning and taking points, I might change the problem to give a gimkit example of one of the students playing it
Catherine O'Neil
01:52:08
Which shading has more or less?
kathleenkerkhoff
01:52:13
6/4
Stephanie Richardson
01:52:14
6/4
Jerry White
01:52:15
6 , 4ths
Elizabeth Ross
01:52:21
1 1/2 6/8
tennessee.judkins
01:52:26
1 1/2
Jerry White
01:52:27
1 1/2
maryann.love
01:52:34
1 1/2
maryann.love
01:55:39
Kalani has 62 cents. How many of each coin could she have?
Stephanie Richardson
01:55:45
Kalani needs to buy a toy for $5.50. How many different ways can she make that amount? (I’ll be honest, I’m a bit stumped at adding MP 8 into it.)
kathleenkerkhoff
01:56:15
I’m stumped because the amounts are pretty concrete; how to shake it up
Derek
01:57:28
What coins would you use to buy x?
Catherine O'Neil
01:59:23
2
e02228
01:59:24
2
Stephanie Richardson
01:59:24
2
kathleenkerkhoff
01:59:25
2
Terry Pike
01:59:26
2
Jerry White
01:59:26
2
Catherine O'Neil
01:59:28
10
Terry Pike
01:59:29
10
kathleenkerkhoff
01:59:29
10
Stephanie Richardson
01:59:30
10
Max Pananen
01:59:31
10
jdunning
01:59:31
10
e02228
01:59:32
10
Catherine O'Neil
01:59:54
20
Max Pananen
01:59:57
20
tennessee.judkins
01:59:58
20
Stephanie Richardson
01:59:58
20
Terry Pike
01:59:59
20?
Jerry White
02:00:01
15
kathleenkerkhoff
02:00:05
20
kathleenkerkhoff
02:03:37
9x2.1
Derek
02:03:54
bottom left
Christina Webster
02:03:55
9.7X55.6
Jerry White
02:05:19
Conjecture Cards.
jdunning
02:05:26
I want to work on conjecturing
Christina Webster
02:05:33
Writing conjectures came easier than I thought it would, will definitely be using them.
e02228
02:05:34
Using PICS
Lisa Varner
02:05:37
I want to work on opening tasks.
Terry Pike
02:05:42
Best Tool
Stephanie Richardson
02:05:43
I love the idea of conjectures, and hope to use questions like the last slide during discussions
maryann.love
02:05:51
We are looking forward to opening tasks.
Catherine O'Neil
02:05:53
Open ended questions
Derek
02:05:56
Conjectures, but it'll take some work!
siefertc
02:06:03
Counting counters, students have been doing similar activities with blocks, also I like the best tool
Stephanie Richardson
02:07:32
…being flexible with my thinking.
Terry Pike
02:07:34
...knowing what you know and how you know it...
Derek
02:07:53
Using multiple strategies to understand, solve, and explain
Christina Webster
02:07:54
Pushing yourself and your students to think bigger than traditional mathematics
tennessee.judkins
02:07:59
…endless answers.
Catherine O'Neil
02:08:03
...finding a way that makes sense to you and explaining it to someone else.
maryann.love
02:08:07
sharing your thinking with others and learning from their thinking.
Andrea Colvin
02:08:07
thinking about problems before, during, and after solving
Lisa Varner
02:08:10
Mathematical reasoning is critical in the development of understanding math concepts.
Jerry White
02:08:10
Figuring out, by using math, how to solve real world problems.
e02228
02:08:12
...learning, growing, and discovering
siefertc
02:08:13
Looking for different ways to solve a problem and using different tools to check for answers.
siefertc
02:08:56
Continuing to use these strategies to start my classes.
Catherine O'Neil
02:09:00
… using some of the strategies in my classroom to empower students to do well.
Terry Pike
02:09:03
Thinking outside the curriculum materials - what do my students need to truly understand?
Christina Webster
02:09:03
Being committed to try new things in the classroom
Stephanie Richardson
02:09:09
…giving students the opportunity to find various ways to solve problems, talk about their mathematical thinking, and friendly argue with others.
Christina Webster
02:09:13
Thank you!!!
Derek
02:09:19
Allowing for multiple ways of doing, and discussing their strengths (and weakenesses)
Lisa Varner
02:09:22
I will support mathematical reasoning by building a daily routine into my math class. I will also encourage meaningful discourse among students regarding mathematics.
kathleenkerkhoff
02:09:24
not jumping to the solution, but honor the process - they are varied and creative
Melissa Crane
02:09:32
Survey 4: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/L67BQZT
maryann.love
02:09:33
We will support mathematical reasoning by trying new things in the classroom that we learned from this class.
Catherine O'Neil
02:09:41
I have enjoyed the course.
Stephanie Richardson
02:09:48
Thank you!
Jerry White
02:10:00
… teaching children that it’s okay to have to think about problem solving.
e02228
02:10:02
Giving more opportunities to find different ways to solve problems and allowing students to share their thinking with each other.