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MEPI MS-14 - Shared screen with speaker view
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
20:25
Still learning to do Math on beer!!!!!
Abba Gumel
21:01
Nice one, Mimi....a tall order-:))))
Jude Dzevela Kong
38:22
Please free to type your question on the chat
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
52:10
That student is at Cornel
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
54:34
Cornell
Meshach Ndlovu
01:03:18
having poor connection
Meshach Ndlovu
01:03:21
How does mosquito viruses density within host and within vector impact transmission to, and trajectory of replication within, the following arthropod vector and human or animal host?
Jude Dzevela Kong
01:04:55
If you have any question for Dr. Gumel, please put on a chat or raise you hand up and we will be happy to call you up to ask your question
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:05:27
Great question Meshach
Ian Frigaard
01:06:33
Interesting map - are mosquitos also native to the Americas, or have they migrated? Maybe with birds or humans?
Peter Rashkov
01:06:41
@Meshach: there is no conclusive evidence in the case of dengue, so far as I know.
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:08:10
A number of factors are involved for malaria. That is what makes malaria so complex. The parasite density in human host at the asexual stage, if it succeed to form gametocytes increases transmissibility to mosquitoes.
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:09:03
But the mosquitoes must pick male and female gametocytes. Then a suppression depression happens in the mosquito
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:11:38
In mosquitoes, oocysts must be produced to increase the possibility of a mosquito being infectious. Thus, all things must line up well. and they are lining well in malaria endemic regions.
CNN
01:12:18
In terms of control or containing malaria, are socio-economic factors and human behavior in response to control measures not also important?
Joshua Macdonald
01:13:39
Dengue modeling is especially interesting as there is evidence that if you catch one strain of dengue and subsequently catch another strain of dengue during the period of waining immunity there can be a more severe pathology i the second instance
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:15:39
Great point Joshua. Interesting and complex problem as well.
Peter Rashkov
01:17:55
Well, with dengue the severe disease may not be linked with viral loads in an obvious way, because severe dengue fever sets on after virus is almost cleared. There are a lot of asymptomatic dengue patients, which seems to drive the circulation of the disease. But what viral loads are in asymptomatic patients, is not well known.
Joshua Macdonald
01:18:02
yes, and one that probably calls for multi-scale epi-immunological to really get to
Joshua Macdonald
01:21:57
preprint of honeymoon effect here:https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008292
Joshua Macdonald
01:22:21
form Dr. Lloyd et al.
Hetsron NYANDJO
01:22:27
Very interesting comments @Dr Miranda
Ian Frigaard
01:31:36
can one have divorce before honeymoon - it could save a lot of money and time!
CNN
01:32:01
https://euro-math-soc.eu/ems-simons-africa
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
01:32:21
Ian, goodone.
Joshua Macdonald
01:40:13
some evidence/modeling in US suggests ~9 months for natural immunity and ~12 months for Moderna vaccine
Joshua Macdonald
01:45:34
linear chain trick, yes?
Abba Gumel
01:50:18
The statement about lower mobility in Cameroon than in Germany seems strange.... what's the logic behind this?
Meshach Ndlovu
01:54:11
There is enough vaccine available to completely innoculate half of the total population now, and the other half one time period in the future. If the time period is small compared with the rate of progression of the epidemic, it is easy to see that it is better to fully innoculate one town/province now, and the other town/province later rather than half of each now and the other half later: Case of resourced limited countries like Zimbabwe
Abba Gumel
01:56:23
What is crucially-needed is to liberalize the licensing rights and allow each country to produce the vaccines internally...like was done during the height of the AIDS pandemic (when the highly-active antiretroviral therapies were developed). The pharma companies have to know that in moments like this, saving lives trumps (no pun intended) making a few bucks.
Laurence Ketchemen Tchouaga
01:57:29
Happy birthday Dr Ngwa
Abba Gumel
02:02:05
Great job, Ian. Great job, UBC!
Gwen F
02:02:30
Happy birthday Prof Ngwa. You are a real legend
Berinyuy Njong
02:04:42
Monsieur mon pere. . . happy birthday and many thanks for helping us grow. A long road to go and we hope we can keep the tourch lit.
Fomboh
02:06:45
Happy birth day Prof Ngwa
Laurence Ketchemen Tchouaga
02:07:30
Sorry, I need to leave. Thanks to the speakers for such great talks
Dr. Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
02:07:37
Thanks to all who made this successful
Meshach Ndlovu
02:09:23
Happy Big Day Prof.
Aliou Bouba
02:09:48
HBD grand pa.Aliou Bouba
James A. Njongwe
02:09:49
Happy Birthday Prof Ngwa