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2020 Summit TVE: 2.2 Design Impact: Exploring our Histories: Race and Development - Shared screen with speaker view
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
34:07
Hello everyone! Good to see some familiar faces!
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
51:09
You can access your worksheet here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v9cgnfeaRiR7VT4aTd5LzoBGhZKFjGdWwadaGMktPUI/edit
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
01:12:46
What did you notice?
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
01:13:03
How could you use this in your community?
Molly Scruta
01:14:58
I was struck by how little this local history is taught in our area schools
Mary Kidd Ray
01:17:29
I think this was a great example of why we need to plan for thoughtful integrated neighborhoods. We saw that historically we decided we were all going to live together, but then created a lot of barriers to break that down.
Elizabeth Bartley
01:19:52
please remember to mute if you are not speaking otherwise we pick up background noises. Thanks!
Jeff Raser
01:20:47
FANTASTIC book to read: The Color of Law” by Richard Rothstein.https://wwnorton.com/books/The-Color-of-Law/
Derrick Blassingame
01:21:44
We need to encourage upward mobility in Cincinnati.
Queen City Vignette
01:21:48
I am struck by how little property rights of African Americans have seemed to matter close to the city center. There is such a high priority of business and transport over community
Molly Scruta
01:22:09
(What Queen City Vignette just said!)
Molly Scruta
01:22:30
And… one interesting variation of this activity… omitting the dates/years and encouraging participants to try and a.) place the events in the correct order and b.) guess years/time frames ;) we sometimes do this in our campus Safe Zone trainings with LGBTQ+ history, and it’s always shocking how recently (or not recently) these events have occurred in our history
Nick Swartsell
01:22:39
This exercise made me think a lot about some baseline assumptions and perspectives we carry about the way systemic racism plays out and how various forces are implicated in that. One small example — our prompt talked about policies and laws that have impacted demographic arrangements in Cincinnati. But does that only mean what laws and policies explicitly dictated? Or does it also include things the laws didn’t necessarily enumerate, but definitely allowed to happen? I.E. white mobs forced black Cincinnatians from the city’s Bucktown neighborhood starting in the late 1820s. The laws didn’t dictate this had to happen, but policy makers and law enforcement certainly did not try to stop it and in some cases aided it.
Chas Wiederhold (he/him)
01:22:44
Love that Molly.
Queen City Vignette
01:23:12
yes, Jamie, definitely putting new labels on old habits seems to be way to sustain old practices
Derrick Blassingame
01:23:54
I was late. Hopefully this activity will be offered in the future.
Peter Hames
01:24:21
Read “The Social Characteristics of Cincinnati” from UC
Kevin Shaw
01:25:14
I was struck by how much there still is to learn. There is so much history in our city that we either aren't here/local for, aren't taught, or is not fully emphasized/understood, so maybe a crowdsourced history of relevant local events, articles, books, policies, data, etc. would be useful.
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
01:25:15
Black American Tree Project
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:25:57
https://inclusion.com/product/black-america-tree-project/
Elizabeth Bartley
01:27:04
we are planning on offering the black American tree project (virtually) as part of this series Just haven't pinned down the date yet. stay tuned!
Queen City Vignette
01:27:27
I think it would be really important to expand this timeline outside the city of Cincinnati to neighborhoods/small cities like Woodlawn, Wyoming, Esp Lincoln Heights
Queen City Vignette
01:29:47
oh my gosh, yes, the tax credits being handed out in the form of housing subsidizing is lining the pockets of redeveloped a on
Queen City Vignette
01:30:31
*redevelopers in the form of higher sale prices, rather than keeping tax savings with low income housing
Jessica Hemmer
01:31:32
^ the same regarding small business rent costs
Nick Swartsell
01:31:46
So well said Kate. Somehow the ways displacement happens change — via policy, law, etc — but the outcome (and who benefits and suffers) remains the same.
Queen City Vignette
01:31:49
yes definitely, Jessica
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:32:33
sarah@d-impact.org; caitlin@d-impact.org
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:32:42
https://madisonvilleproject.blogspot.com/
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
01:32:43
https://madisonvilleproject.blogspot.com/
Jessica Hemmer
01:32:45
How do we activate this in city council?
Reba Hennessey - Your Store of the Queen City
01:32:48
Would there be a way to share contact information and continue conversations with this group?
Jamie Kreindler
01:32:56
Does Design Impact have additional resources that they share with the public as community resources?
Jessica Hemmer
01:33:36
Is there a way for this type of work to be put into some kind of an exhibit that can be made free for people to be brought through?
Julia
01:33:37
Black American Tree Project Danyetta Njoli 5135083866
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:33:56
http://bit.ly/DImailinglist
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:34:41
https://us2.campaign-archive.com/home/?u=a00085990efca74b46e754277&id=a23ca45c3e
Jamie Kreindler
01:35:02
Thank you!
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:35:39
http://d-impact.org/ (tools can be found at https://d-impact.org/news)
Knoxpam
01:35:49
Great opportunity to learn
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:35:59
PAN tool (download it for free!): https://bit.ly/pan_tool
Molly Scruta
01:36:16
Thank you all so much for this! :)
Sarah Corlett (she/her)
01:36:21
Better Housing League
Caitlin Behle (she/her)
01:36:21
Better Housing League
Nick Swartsell
01:36:28
Thanks y’all for this!
Nova Ostermann
01:38:18
Thank you for facilitating this session. Great conversation.
Kate Botos
01:38:23
Thank you Sarah and Caitlin!
Kate Botos
01:38:45
and Elizabeth!