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LA Creole's 16th Annual Conference - Shared screen with speaker view
Andrew Jolivette
42:54
This is a great story. It really reflects the geographic diversity and differences among LC identified peoples
Andrew Jolivette
01:08:25
Such a great pot, Bliss especially given the recent revelations about professors and activists pretending to be Black…it makes it very hard for “white passing” folks to identify as Black or mixed-race
Andrew Jolivette
01:08:30
*point
Brad Broomfield
01:09:27
this touches on the idea that identity is more than how we personally identify, but also how the state identifies us.
Brad Broomfield
01:10:40
and of course, as we saw once Louisiana became part of the US, identify can certainly change virtually overnight.
Bliss Broyard
01:12:34
Rose Glapion was my cousin.
Andrew Jolivette
01:15:27
That’s a fantastic point, Bailey
Andrew Jolivette
01:16:24
I think it relates to “passing” in general. Using “passing” reinscribes the idea that race is fixed, primordial, and essential
Andrew Jolivette
01:19:22
I like this exchange because it also takes away the assumption that white passing means you have it easier or automatically privileged when many folks like Bliss’ dad and other Creoles who appear white still suffered due to the conditions of being Black people
Andrew Jolivette
01:21:04
It reminds me also of my own family. Like my dad in high school ran home because other Black students had a day called, “Grey neck day” where they beat up white kids even though he mainly self-identified as Black and this was in San Francisco
Andrew Jolivette
01:34:24
Situational and contextual ethnicity
Chantell Nabonne
01:38:38
Human here! Ici <3 Thanks JQ
Andrew Jolivette
01:38:58
a Creole category affirms the complexity of Creole peoplehood and Creole identities
Andrew Jolivette
01:39:32
Andrew Jolivette
Andrew Jolivette
01:41:14
Because it would challenge notions of race as essential and primordial it would challenged the limited notions of Blackness
Andrew Jolivette
01:51:04
I’ve been to many Creole presentations and I must say this is a phenomenal panel. Excellent job. Thank you also so much. Hiwew/Mesi/Gracias to all of you for this amazing discussion
Andrew Jolivette
01:53:11
New Orleans Creoles are different though lol…my bias my family is from southwest, LA with NOLA connections further back
Andrew Jolivette
01:54:08
I feel like Creole diaspora folks sometimes maintained more Creole culture than those back home similar to many immigrant groups.
Andrew Jolivette
01:54:57
For example Los Angeles, Chicago, and SF/Oakland Bay Area Creoles maintain Creole traditions that some in Louisiana don’t engage as much anymore
Brad Broomfield
01:55:11
From where does the definition of creole as “mixture” from? That seems very anglo-American.
Brad Broomfield
01:55:23
come* from
Andrew Jolivette
01:55:50
YES!!!!
Andrew Jolivette
01:56:19
They need to define who is white just like we need to identify who is Black, Creole etc
Brad Broomfield
01:56:42
since no human is “pure” can then anyone claim creole from this definition?
Andrew Jolivette
01:57:56
@Brad no. it has specific geographic, linguistic, and culture roots
Brad Broomfield
01:59:15
I agree with that, Andrew. But then the definition has to remain beyond notions of race.
Andrew Jolivette
01:59:55
Oh I agree. Its an ethnic marker for me…meaning cultural not a social construct
Brad Broomfield
02:00:47
if it those things as you say (and I agree that it is), then non-mixed people fall into that ethnicity. one of the presenters mentioned Creole means “mixed” so that threw me a bit
Dr. Wendy Gaudin
02:01:18
“Mixed” within very specific historical contexts, I believe she meant.
Andrew Jolivette
02:01:25
They said that’s how its used today mostly
Andrew Jolivette
02:02:08
They acknowledged that it has been used first as Europeans born in the Americas and then for mixed people and that today its contextually used mostly to refer to mixed folks
Mora Beauchamp-Byrd
02:02:47
This was truly engaging and insightful! Thanks to Wendy, LA Creole and all of the panelists for a fantastic discussion!!
Andrew Jolivette
02:02:56
Thank you! Great Job!
Bliss Broyard
02:03:05
Thank you for having me!
Stephanie Summers
02:03:11
Thank you. This was a wonderful discussion!!
Lucinda Gaddis
02:03:17
Thank you for your perspectives.
Andrew Jolivette
02:04:04
Nice to see you, Bliss!
Bailey Duhé
02:04:17
Thank you! I am available at baileyjduhe@gmail.com if anyone wants to follow up or participate in my dissertation interviews on Creole identity.
Bliss Broyard
02:04:53
Great questions and points Andrew!
Angela Aubry
02:05:21
Thank you panel. Although I only got in for the last 15 minutes, it seems to have been very enlightening and informative.
Charles Rosenberg
02:05:31
excellent discussion. hope we can do it next year in person.