Zoom Logo

Water Equity Task Force Meeting #1 - Shared screen with speaker view
Russ Sands
01:10:14
https://engagecwcb.org/water-equity
Russ Sands
01:10:51
You can also send emails to our Sara - sara.leonard@state.co.us
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:29:51
Listen and try to understand other perspectives, even if you don't agree.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:30:35
We are not here today to debate, argue, or convince, just to begin to explore the fullness of perspectives and experiences.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:30:54
Give everyone an opportunity to participate, no person or idea dominates.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:31:13
Our time together is limited, please be respectful of time limits.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:31:46
Be yourself and be engaged.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:33:20
Be respectful of the ideas and opinions of others.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:33:50
Disagree without being disagreeable.
Joy Lujan (she/her/ella)
01:34:39
Show up authentically.
Rio de la Vista
01:45:40
A huge urban rural divide is the huge differential in the cash valuation of water in urban areas that affects the water in rural areas, that sustains the agricultural economies along with recreation and wildlife habitat. It makes rural water supplies continually vulnerable to exportation as urban populations grow.
Rio de la Vista
01:52:53
This opinion piece from yesterday in the Denver Post relates to Abby’s comment: https://theknow.denverpost.com/2021/05/17/colorado-outdoors-vandalism-trail-damage/258645/
Rio de la Vista
02:05:59
A thought in regards to grants. Having worked for non-profits for many years, specific challenges with grants are in the process of writing them, identifying and timing of matching funds, management of the grants with both implementation and reporting, and more. Often it requires getting several grants lined up to come in at workable time frames. A recent example of an attempt to address this is the RESTORE Colorado grant process, through which a number of funders joined together to offer a grant opportunity that had match built in (though more is welcome) so not required. Naturally, there are insufficient funds to meet the demand as of now, but the model is worth exploring so that grant applicants can better access needed funds.
Rio de la Vista
02:07:29
The complexity of access grants does often steer it to the more developed non-profits. If they can partner with others, it can open doors, but overall, the process can be very daunting.
mikeroque
02:09:55
Funding has to have less strings attached. Must be more accessible to new organizations working with marginalized communities.
mikeroque
02:11:35
Couple Technical Assistance with Grants
Barbara Biggs
02:15:05
How about a mentoring program for specific communities to help them access programs and grants?
Rio de la Vista
02:18:52
Barbara, At the Rio Grande Roundtable, we’ve worked over the years to actively assist possible projects proponents to develop their projects in ways that make them competitive and a good fit for CWCB great opportunities. It is still a big learning curve, especially for example for a water entity that may only need funding very intermittently. The Roundtable can be a supportive place for this, especially in smaller population communities.
Kathy Rall
02:35:00
We respectfully think of the water resources folks, (including me) who have been in the water world for a while as Water Buffalo's ! ;)
Barbara Biggs
02:39:19
Metro State University in Denver also has a Water Minor supported by the University's One World One Water Center, and serves a very diverse student body and first generation students.
Rio de la Vista
02:39:47
Thanks Ronda! The Water Studies Minor at Adams State was inspired by existing Water Programs at other universities. And its development, along with scholarships for some of the courses, stipends for faculty to develop courses, and many other aspects were thankfully funded by a Colorado Water Plan grant from CWCB.
Alina Luna
02:40:24
Western has a BA in Water Studies https://western.edu/program/water-studies/
Rio de la Vista
02:42:03
Metro, Mesa, Western, CSU, CU, Fort Lewis, Mines, and many other schools have a number of water education opportunities. And there are so many career paths that benefit from water literacy!
Abby Burk
02:45:03
Agree with Mely and all. Water exposure is key. My personal water profession began in earnest with middle and high school experiential learning opportunities - and onward through college.
Barbara Biggs
02:47:44
Water is also a great field for young people that are not cut out for a 4-year degree program. Water and wastewater operators play a critical role in water, and these are secure, good paying jobs for interested young people. Front Range Community College has a program to train operators for these important jobs.
Lawrence Gallegos -WLA
03:01:48
Why are you not taking any comments from the public? I have been trying to get my Voice heard about the inequity in how water is being administered in the Rio Grande Basin for over 30 years. During that time I have served on the Rio Grande Basin Round Table, The Rio Grande Water Conservation District, President of the El Codo and Cenicero Acequias in Conejos County. While serving all these I was always been able to be heard but when it came to having takings of water from senior water rights it always seems to fall on deaf ears. CWCB has given both of these acequias grants to improve their infrastructure which is greatly appreciated, but the money spent my all be for not if the underline problem are not addressed. Many of the acequias in Colorado are endanger because they have and are loosing their ability to grow a crop. Hopefully things will change when the subdistricts fail to meet their sustainability requirements the SOE will will then shut down wells.
Rio de la Vista
03:04:02
Will there be a written summary of this meeting? Thanks so much!
Abby Burk
03:04:40
Thank you all.
Barbara Biggs
03:04:41
This has been a great discussion, and I have so enjoyed hearing from all of you.