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Web Seminar: Call to Action for Science Education: Building Opportunity for the Future, 9/27/2021 - Shared screen with speaker view
Luke Larson
01:05:22
Good evening from Miami University
Allegra
01:05:24
in STEM/ESOL in my second semester and student teaching a 9th grade Earth and Space science class
Isaac Gadson
01:05:26
Dayton Ohio
Ted Willard
01:05:47
Good evening everyone!
Amador, Gloria
01:05:49
The future is in our classrooms today ...
Jane Jackson
01:05:56
Hello from Scottsdale, AZ.
Arlene Marturano
01:06:27
Hello from Columbia, SC
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:06:30
Hello and welcome everyone! We are excited to share a little about The Call to Action for Science Education report and hope you will find useful!
Corinne Marko Murawski
01:06:36
Hello from Pittsburgh, PA.
kathy venable
01:06:41
Good evening from Georgia!
Allegra
01:06:52
Hello from pouring Portland OR
Julia Hawthorne
01:06:52
Hello from Atlanta, GA
Joan
01:06:53
Thank you Tiffany
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
01:07:06
Good evening from The Bahamas
Isabel Borges
01:07:49
Good evening from Lisbon, Portugal
Bev DeVore-Wedding (she/her) Adams State
01:08:19
Hello from Alamosa Colorado!
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:08:36
Welcome everyone to today's program: Call to Action for Science Education: Building Opportunity for Science Education
Orla Berry
01:08:47
Hello from Medfield Massachusetts
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:09:02
Program slides are in the collection: https://my.nsta.org/collection/evTC_sWWR2mU_E
sanaa
01:09:48
Hello everyone from Kuwait
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:11:06
Wonderful background music Heidi!
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:13:36
You are listening to Jim Short, Carnegie Corporation of NY
Gregg Godsey
01:14:27
A good day from Spokane, Washington
Heidi Schweingruber
01:15:41
https://www.openscied.org/
Heidi Schweingruber
01:17:27
https://www.carnegie.org/publications/elements-transforming-teaching-through-curriculum-based-professional-learning/
Heidi Schweingruber
01:17:45
The second link I posted above is to The Elements report Jim just mentioned.
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:22:58
Call to Action for Science Education: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/call-to-action-for-science-education
Wendi Vogel
01:23:22
That trumpet would go really well with the French horn happening at my house right now. :)
Wendi Vogel
01:23:35
Don't apologize!!
Jana Penders
01:23:56
It is great background music!
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:24:15
All of the reports you see on the screen are free! You can look them up on the https://www.nationalacademies.org/ site or google them.
Jim Short
01:25:35
Be sure to keep a look out for the upcoming report the Academies is releasing next month on PreK-5 science and engineering - October 7th !!
AMS Education Program
01:26:40
Referencing them when seeking funding to offer earth science teacher PD.
cflaherty
01:26:42
gathering data for specific funding
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:26:56
I reference these documents when I do PD with teachers
Kelly Talaga
01:26:59
The Framework was integral in helping administrators and teachers start to implement the NGSS.
rebeccaolien
01:26:59
To inform curriculum developmennt
Bev DeVore-Wedding (she/her) Adams State
01:27:03
Using the Call to Action to guide our Colorado's science educator network
Adam Johnston (he/him)
01:27:08
I use them with preservice teachers to understand where their standards, etc. come from.
Jen Seretan
01:27:10
creating a new online high school science class
Shannon Wachowski
01:27:11
When supporting pre-service teachers
AlisonRisso
01:27:16
Convincing partners of the importance of early effective science instruction
Dylan Harvey
01:27:17
I have not used them, but I certainly need to!
Mark Meszaros
01:27:25
As a product developer, I use all these reports to help improve science product development
Dan Voss
01:27:25
Used Developing Assessments report to show admin need for building 3d assessments
Elizabeth Hartman
01:27:26
This is used in my department meetings to guide curriculum.
Daryl Greenfield U of Miami (he/him)
01:27:37
Messaging about the importance of STEM education beginning early in life
Emma Mellott
01:27:40
I am currently in my student teaching year of college. I am personally looking at data to help decide where I want to teach and to better understand the importance of science in classrooms.
Gregg Godsey
01:27:41
In training preservice elementary teachers.
Joan
01:27:43
I have never seen them before
Wendi Vogel
01:28:02
Read reports as teacher, used to assist in implementation, reference guides over and over again, etc. Such great resources
Erika Shugart, NSTA
01:28:05
I created museum exhibitions based on them earlier in my career and we use them to guide the work here at NSTA!
Kevin Anderson
01:28:07
Using as motivation/evidence to change instruction at the high school level in particular
Jim Short
01:28:07
All of the reports from the National Academies are free to download at the National Academy Press web site
Mike Harshbarger
01:28:08
I wasn’t aware of many of these reports.
Melissa Mendenhall
01:28:14
State science specialist meeting: Building capacity
Julia Hawthorne
01:28:15
I have never seen them
Joan
01:28:27
I’m excited to read them!
Rachel Kennerly
01:28:38
I am an informal educator and I use them to collaborate with teachers in my district so that the curriculum im using meets their expectations and needs
Mark Meszaros
01:28:39
I love that each report supports and unpacks greater detail as we continue to do research on science education.
Dr. Ami LeFevre
01:28:40
Used to provide PD for science teachers in my department and to teach pre-service science teachers.
Brooke Marinock
01:28:53
I am still learning this reports because I am still learning how to be a teacher
Erika Shugart, NSTA
01:29:07
You can find a link to the National Academy Press, where you can read the reports for free from a link in the collection -https://my.nsta.org/collection/evTC_sWWR2mU_E
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:30:44
Brooke, these are wonderful reports for teachers. Ready Set Science, The Framework for K-12 Science Education and Science and Engineering for grades 6-12 are a few starters for you.
Dan Voss
01:32:02
They're often kind of long to read cover to cover as a classroom teacher but the summaries are good and they tend to have lots of helpful tables and figures that are easy to key in on.
Heidi Schweingruber
01:33:09
@Dan -- agreed! They can be long. We try to make it possible to read each chapter on it's own. And also, Ready, Set, Science and Seeing Students Learn Science are designed more for classroom teachers. Shorter for those with less time, and with rich examples of classroom instruction.
jorge Perez Santander
01:33:43
Jorge perez s
Joan
01:34:55
Heidi are those in a different area? (Ready, set, science
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
01:35:03
This is so refreshing! Science has been lost in the acronym,
jorge Perez Santander
01:35:14
para todos ,this conference is very importan for my job like teacher of science
Joan
01:35:21
I agree
Heidi Schweingruber
01:35:28
@Joan - those reports are also accessible on the NAP website.
Joan
01:35:38
Thank you!
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:36:45
Where do I find the list of the states that have adopted the standards?
Daryl Greenfield U of Miami (he/him)
01:37:04
STEM starts with the "S" for science. It is not random that it leads and goes first
Brianna Wilkinson
01:37:24
I think the shift to include practices is encouraging.
Mark Meszaros
01:37:25
The discussion has moved from
Mara Vaile
01:37:29
I have seen a shift to promoting science literacy but I am worried that there is not a clear definition of what science literacy.
Sarah Ruggiero Kirby (she/her)
01:37:30
The deliberate inclusion of Climate Science and climate change language
Ted Willard
01:37:32
@Elizabeth... There is a good map on this page: https://www.nsta.org/science-standards
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
01:37:34
I have seen teachers in chicago embrace the change
Jen Seretan
01:37:35
NGSS is not linear but multi-tiered, integrated focus.
Kirk Brown
01:37:36
Shifting to make sense of phenomena by students
R. Bogdanoff, Volusia, rcbogdan@volusia.k12.fl.us
01:37:37
A greater emphasis of science literacy and promoting the inquiry process
Kelli Grabowski - STEM Coord. CABOCES
01:37:38
kids are seeing themselves in science more, and are more excited about science class
Melissa Mendenhall
01:37:42
Teachers moving to three-dimensional instruction based in authentic phenomena
Bridget Walsh (she/her)
01:37:46
Moving away from memorizing and to sense making
David Randle
01:37:46
New curricula
Gregg Godsey
01:37:46
Elementary teachers and preservice students are much more receptive to integrating science education in their curriculum
Aida Awad
01:37:46
More student centered classrooms, where students do take ownership of their learning
Ellen Ervin
01:37:48
focus on phenomena and sense making, three-dimensional teaching
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:37:50
High school teachers still want to cover curriculum… so we need help there...
Jen Seretan
01:37:52
phenomena based
kathy venable
01:37:53
student led instruction, inquiry based with phenomena
Mara Vaile
01:37:53
Project based learning
Dylan Harvey
01:37:55
I have seen a greater emphasis on diversity in science media for the classroom.
Corinne Marko Murawski
01:37:59
People seem to embrace the SEPs a bit more but we still need work on including the CCCs
Kevin Anderson
01:38:03
A focus more on sensemaking!
Wendi Vogel
01:38:04
Shift from teacher to student center instruction, still a long way to go, especially in elementary just to get science taught
Emma Mellott
01:38:13
Focusing on phenomenas and 3 dimensional learning.
Mark Meszaros
01:38:14
The discussion has shifted from 'what is NGSS' to how do I teach NGSS. How do I incorporate phenomenon and sense making.
Dr. Ami LeFevre
01:38:15
3D Assessments!
Julie Olds
01:38:17
Elementary school principals are beginning to talk to their teachers about teaching science as at least a little bit of a priority.
Cathie
01:38:17
at the k-4 level science more than 1 or two days a week.
Jana Penders
01:38:18
Encouraging: Science is for ALL students; science literacy is vital for everyone; science literacy is vital for a well-functioning democracy
Melissa Mendenhall
01:38:20
Helping teachers facilitate student sensemaking
Bridget Walsh (she/her)
01:38:23
Actually shifting this into classrooms. Lots of talk of theory, need more action
Allegra
01:38:23
This summer I taught ELL 11yr olds climate science!
Mark Meszaros
01:38:23
3D assessment
Mara Vaile
01:38:24
There are lots of different definitions of science literacy
Kelli Grabowski - STEM Coord. CABOCES
01:38:28
Time for teachers to learn how this different
Joan
01:38:29
Easier understanding of framework
Jen Seretan
01:38:29
the importance or critical thinking regardless of whether one wants to be a scientist
Sarah Ruggiero Kirby (she/her)
01:38:34
Science as a process (not linear), but web-like and on-going.
Ana G Mena
01:38:35
I agree, more science in lower grade levels!
Kevin Anderson
01:38:37
Need progress in elementary (making it happen) and lecture focus in college...
Kirk Brown
01:38:42
Progress needs to be made in how assessment can support student sensemaking
Mike Harshbarger
01:38:44
Unfortunately I have not seen any shift. Where I work and live, we are still within the paradigm that only math and reading are important. There is virtually no science education at the elementary level here.
sanaa
01:38:47
to improve lab virtual learning
Kelli Grabowski - STEM Coord. CABOCES
01:38:47
Substitutes/time for teachers
Bev DeVore-Wedding (she/her) Adams State
01:38:50
More time devoted to science in early elementary grades...at least on paper
Mary Loesing
01:38:51
Phenomena is out there. We need more sources of 3-D assessments and quality curriculum.
Joan
01:38:56
Yes time to learn ourselves
Don Boonstra, NSTA
01:39:04
This link has the States that have adopted and adapted https://ngss.nsta.org/about.aspx
Alicia Lorenzo
01:39:06
We still need professional development that hasn't reach all teachers. There isn't sufficient in depth training. I teach in an Elementary school.
Orla Berry
01:39:07
Yes - more time for science at all levels!
Joan
01:39:14
I love how different science is from when I was in school!
Wendi Vogel
01:39:15
Content understanding for elementary teachers. They want to teach it, but aren't always confident in the content, or where a storyline is going.
Julie Olds
01:39:22
We need LOTS more emphasis/expectation of science happening in elementary
Kevin Anderson
01:39:22
Systems level support needed...
kathy venable
01:39:24
Apply knowledge to solving problems or scenarios- moving from facts or "trivia" to application and analysis of problems.
Ellen Ervin
01:39:25
More professional learning
Alicia Lorenzo
01:39:58
There needs to be time for explicit teaching instruction and more time needs to allocated. The science curriculum needs to be imbedded with the core instruction.
Mark Meszaros
01:40:15
One area that still needs progress for instructors and students to understand that making mistakes is all part of sense making. That is how real scientist learn.
Gregg Godsey
01:40:20
Often still seeing math and english standards as the most important in curriculum - separate from integration and application in real world.
rebeccaolien
01:40:29
Evidence statements being used as the only situations in curriculum rather than using these as examples
Jeff Koncz
01:40:32
Collaborative projects between subjects can help remedy that
Joan
01:40:33
Many students in lower grades don’t get science until 4th grade when testing starts
Wendi Vogel
01:40:50
I don't doubt your stats, but K-2 is likely much worse, if at all
Julie Olds
01:40:57
in our city there’s less than 20 minutes per day
Bev DeVore-Wedding (she/her) Adams State
01:41:32
More project-based learning
Heidi Schweingruber
01:41:34
And an average as presented here, means that some places have LESS than 20 min per day for science.
Jana Penders
01:42:02
Room to improve: Helping non-science people to understand and appreciate the importance of science literacy; helping ALL teachers/administrators to realize the overlap of science with other disciplines; how can we promote multidisciplinary learning/curriculum to correlate with the current focus on math and ELA? More cross-disciplinary curriculum will empower science to be covered simultaneously with CCSS (math, ELA) topics…
Rachel Kennerly
01:42:08
and it a lot of rural school, science is an elective in high schools
Jim Short
01:42:23
The report continues to ask for better, more equitable science education. The data Tiffany is talking about show there is still work in K-12 education to make this a reality.
Mary Loesing
01:42:30
In NY and perhaps elsewhere we are facing a shortage of science teachers, particularly physical science teachers - making it more difficult for all schools to offer these courses.
Mark Meszaros
01:42:59
These stats are just sad. We need equity.
Heidi Schweingruber
01:43:00
@Mary -- the shortage of science teachers is a huge issue and really varies by location/community.
Allegra
01:43:59
I'm happy to say that the title one schools with 80+ percent ELL that I am student teaching in have Physics, biology, chemistry, and earth and space science!
Brian Hamilton
01:44:02
Curious...are the number of students entering science in college increasing or decreasing? I wonder how that is impacting the number of future science teachers.
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:44:34
That’s amazing Allegra! We need to hear more about how schedules are being structured to do this! We need more examples like yours!
Elmarie Mortimer
01:45:16
Better facilities
Mara Vaile
01:45:17
smaller class sizes
Cathie
01:45:25
time
Jeff Koncz
01:45:25
Modernize the classroom
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
01:45:25
Tools
Jarika Naputo
01:45:28
Classroom support for SPED students in inclusion settings
Joan
01:45:29
Materials, access to website sites
Kirk Brown
01:45:31
More time allocated to professional learning
Jen Seretan
01:45:32
My public school is online. There are lots of virtual tools. More please
Bev DeVore-Wedding (she/her) Adams State
01:45:33
Teachers who know science; teachers who are not afraid to teach science; teachers who can integrate content to enhance learning
Pat Chun CHAN
01:45:35
more teaching time
Aida Awad
01:45:35
More time with students
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:45:37
Teachers need to have high quality curriculum, PD and high quality resources/materials. All 3 = Awesomeness!
samantha.lavan
01:45:37
more materials
Mary Loesing
01:45:41
Mandated time for science at the elementary level statewide.
Kelli Grabowski - STEM Coord. CABOCES
01:45:43
TIME, collaboration with experts in the new science teaching methods
sanaa
01:45:47
time and lab equipment
Dylan Harvey
01:45:49
More materials for hands on investigations
HALLW
01:45:50
Phenomena and more time incorporating the CCC.
Gregg Godsey
01:45:52
Strong integrated curriculum especially K-3.
Abrianna Moore
01:45:53
Larger budget so less money is out of pocket
dan vincent
01:45:53
seems like the culture of elementary schools is geared towards the ELA / Math...how do we challenge the 3Rs culture of elementary schools?
Julie Olds
01:45:54
District leadership prioritizing time for science instruction and teacher PD time
Eileen Patrick
01:45:55
admin support and the expectation that science is included in the daily schedule.
Wendi Vogel
01:45:56
Time for professional learning, especially curriculum embedded
Joan Ancona
01:46:00
Time for required professional learning
Pat Chun CHAN
01:46:01
more inquiry work
Julia Hawthorne
01:46:02
More time to teach and integrate across curriculum
Sarah Brooks
01:46:03
Better more updated facilities
Alicia Lorenzo
01:46:04
Would like to have supplemental materials and Curriculum Specialist to provide feedback for new materials teachers want to include or improve upon.
Brian Hamilton
01:46:05
Physical space and an understanding of the increased space needs of science classroom. Many administrators and state policy makers have one calculation for space to student ratio.
Jim Short
01:46:06
@Brian STEM majors in college are on the rise. However only about 20% of students enter college. Making science education in K-12 more equitable could change that.
Allegra
01:46:06
I need to look into the K-5 schools in the district but I know 6-12 all have science!
Dan Voss
01:46:10
admin support for schoolwide culture of student-driven learning
Kevin Anderson
01:46:14
Coherent systems of support
Mary Loesing
01:46:18
It would benefit preservice elementary teachers to include science content courses in their programs.
Wendi Vogel
01:46:22
Exemplar models of elementary schedules
Mike Harshbarger
01:46:27
Permission to not have to teach only math and reading. Standardized testing is driving things
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:46:28
And, seriously, we can teach EVERYTHING through science!!
Sherrell Lewis, (she/her)
01:46:32
A central vision, school policies and culture that celebrates science
Alicia Lorenzo
01:46:34
Access to online PD that provides us time in the summer to take courses i.e. National Geo classes online helped me a lot with global warming.
Mark Meszaros
01:46:35
Funding to continue to train teachers on 3D instruction, modern and safe labs, science materials and equipment
Aimee Barber
01:46:43
I think it’s important to remember that all priority areas for better and more equitable science education have to be matched with simultaneous efforts to build the societal and administrative view of teachers as professionals. Give teachers voice, decision-making power, autonomy, etc. and these things will change much more quickly and sustainably.
Lara Roketenetz
01:46:49
I run a field station for a University and we also hold informal science opportunities for local K-12. We need support!
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
01:46:49
More support for field trips
Dr. Ami LeFevre
01:46:49
Professional development for teachers in the NGSS area. Open up the virtual world to all teachers for science teacher equity opportunities.
Adam Johnston (he/him)
01:46:59
a re-thinking of the purpose of education?
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
01:47:00
Cultural organizations like Chicago Botanic are trying to adopt same practices to assist teachers and students in learning Life Sciences.
Wendi Vogel
01:47:04
Earth science needs to be there, it's not an elective
Ana Cristina Orellana
01:47:05
I would really like my admin to understand NGSS, phenomena and everything that involves science teaching and learning.
Alicia Lorenzo
01:47:13
Would like to have time to provide a 90 uninterrupted block so that we can include reading, writing and math imbedded in the science block.
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:47:14
+ Aimee! Appreciate that comment!
Shannon Wachowski
01:47:15
high quality instructional materials
Ann Meirick
01:47:22
Being able to include reading or math into science so multiple standards can be met at once!
Aida Awad
01:47:27
+1 @Wendi!
Mark Meszaros
01:47:37
Treat science teachers as professionals means paying them like professionals.
Joan
01:47:43
Understanding about time needed to prepare and setup for labs
Takisha Webb-Kosh
01:47:47
What was the 1st priority mentioned?
Erika Shugart, NSTA
01:47:50
Brian Hamilton - here is some information about S&E undergraduate enrollment from the National Science Board - "Data show that in 2000, about one-third of all freshmen planned to study S&E; this proportion gradually rose to 45% by 2016 (Eagan et al. 2017). ​ Increases in the proportion of freshmen planning to major in biological and agricultural sciences and in engineering account for most of this growth. In 2016 about 45% of freshmen indicated they planned to major in an S&E field (up from about 8% in 2000); about 16% in the biological and agricultural sciences; 11% in engineering; 10% in the social and behavioral sciences; 6% in mathematics, statistics, or computer sciences; and 3% in the physical sciences." https://nsf.gov/statistics/2018/nsb20181/report/sections/higher-education-in-science-and-engineering/undergraduate-education-enrollment-and-degrees-in-the-united-states
Wendi Vogel
01:48:03
Need to allow science teachers in secondary to have certifications (state level) like math, can teach it all to open it up (often, chemistry can only teach chemistry)
Bess Hokett
01:48:15
As a former high school teacher,, now teaching at college level it is sad to learn how these incoming college students do not have to skills they need to be successful in basic college science courses. The degrees we need more people in are science based, but so many are afraid of or lack the understanding to feel confident in these fields. starting the teaching of science earlier in the life of the child when they are full of curiosity is key. crossing the curriculum with math and reading is so important and could be an effective way to allow more time for science in their daily schedules.
Allegra
01:48:41
We read about the Waters school in Chicago IL, look into them for K-5 it is amazing how they are incorporating ecology and science into everything!
Alicia Lorenzo
01:48:46
I feel there is a disconnect from K-5 to the middle school. I teach fifth grade.
Joan
01:49:02
Alicia agree
Jim Short
01:49:02
+1 @Shannon teachers definitely need access to better instructional materials - check out www.openscied.org for freely available middle school science curriculum and high school coming early next year
Carlos Garay del Moral
01:49:16
Fabulous !
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:49:21
Takisha, I missed which slide you were asking about? The first priority on the previous slide was Treat Teachers as Professionals.
Wendi Vogel
01:49:26
YESS!! Culture change. The stories I hear from student in colleges and universities in science courses...scary and sad and awful.
dan vincent
01:49:37
could also advocate for our students to become teachers as a profession
herbthier
01:49:40
A greater focus on modern science concepts such as quantitative reasoning and big data analysis.
Tiffany Neill - OK
01:49:42
Thank you, Allegra. We will take a look at that.
Mark Meszaros
01:50:08
For college, we really need to focus on those gateway courses (gen bio, gen chem, A&P) and provide students the support they need to survive and succeed in these course to keep them in the STEM pipeline.
Joan
01:50:29
As a sp. Ed middle school science teacher I have to do assessment differently for my students
Jana Penders
01:50:33
We can “manufacture time” by working in a more cross-disciplinary manner to incorporate science (and really ALL disciplines) throughout the school day. Double-dipping will help to do more without adding more time to the schedule.
kathy venable
01:50:45
As STEAM coordinator, my school has partnered with experts: engineers, naturalists, entemologists, artists so that students (and teachers) can "ask an expert." Sometimes, it's as easy as a ZOOM call to ignite the passion for our kids. Then, the kids lead the instruction with their curiousity. I say more PARTNERSHIPS with science professionals!
Mary Loesing
01:51:07
@Mark I totally agree with the need to support students in the sciences rather than letting them drop the course and the major.
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:51:12
John Arthur, Teacher of the Year Finalist encourages all of us to tell their students: "You would be a great science teacher." I agree with him...we don't do this enough.
Joan
01:51:13
Is that like Skype with a scientist?
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
01:51:14
@Kathy … I agreed 100
Allegra
01:51:18
http://www.waterselementary.org/about-waters.html
Heidi Schweingruber
01:52:09
The recommendations in this report are targeted at decision makers and policy makers. All of you can help to advocate to get some action on them!
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:52:50
Call to Action Report: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/call-to-action-for-science-education
Alicia Lorenzo
01:52:51
Provide opportunities for ELL's when programs and funding are available so they may have access Science Education.
Heidi Schweingruber
01:53:28
+++ Alicia!!
Takisha Webb-Kosh
01:53:34
@Tiffany...Yes, that's what I meant. Thanks!
Joan
01:54:04
Flavio I tell my students all the time I bet one day I will hear great things you have done for science!
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
01:54:26
That's awesome @Joan!
Rachel Zimmerman Brachman
01:54:36
Make sure students with disabilities are included in science classes, and given a chance to participate actively in labs.
Jane Jackson
01:54:43
For high school sciences, especially physics and chemistry (which connect with post-secondary): we need the US Dept. of Education to re-instate a Title II-A set-aside for higher education institutions to have grant competitions for LOCAL teacher professional development! See my podcast at https://sciencemodelingtalks.com episode 23, and link to my Harvard PoLS-T talk on the abandonment of the US govt. of local teacher professional development in disciplinary sciences. I’m co-director of the Modeling Instruction Pgrm at Arizona State University. http://modeling.asu.edu .
Heidi Schweingruber
01:55:06
@Rachel -- yes, when we are thinking about where we see opportunity gaps, we want to think carefully about opportunities for ALL students.
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:55:15
Call it the Science Alliance!
Joan
01:55:22
Some people only dream of meeting their favorite Scientists; I teach mine!
AMS Education Program
01:55:31
:) !!!
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
01:55:49
@Joan … lol … agreed!
Alicia Lorenzo
01:55:53
Elementary School teachers also need to have access to Stem Opportunities so that we are working from the bottom up.
Ted Willard
01:56:15
Yay CSSS! (pronounced C. S. Cubed)
Kevin Anderson
01:56:19
Woo-hoo! cosss.org!
Jamie Rumage (she/her)
01:56:45
We are here for and with you!! Thank you, Tiffany.
Heidi Schweingruber
01:56:59
The committee's emphasis on local and regional alliances is important for leveraging ALL of the resources that we can use to improve science/STEM education. We can start small with thinking about who to partner with in our own communities.
Takisha Webb-Kosh
01:57:02
Science integration is much needed
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
01:57:52
contact me Kjohnson@chicagobotanic.org to learn more about our FREE Meet a Scientist program.
Joan
01:58:24
I try to at least once a year work with other teachers to have all of us work on one science topic so student will see science is every where in learning!
Ana G Mena
01:58:26
Thank you!
Mark Meszaros
01:58:27
Do not underestimate the power and influence of local alliances of science teachers. Teachers sharing what works with their peers is one of the best ways to raise the overall level of science instruction. There are some excellent examples of science teacher groups throughout the US that have come together to help each other. But I am afraid the pandemic may have really curtailed some of these group. They need support, funding, and encouragement.
AMS Education Program
01:59:04
The National Weather Service also brings meteorologists into classrooms for free. Learn more at Brian Hamilton - here is some information about S&E undergraduate enrollment from the National Science Board - "Data show that in 2000, about one-third of all freshmen planned to study S&E; this proportion gradually rose to 45% by 2016 (Eagan et al. 2017). ​ Increases in the proportion of freshmen planning to major in biological and agricultural sciences and in engineering account for most of this growth. In 2016 about 45% of freshmen indicated they planned to major in an S&E field (up from about 8% in 2000); about 16% in the biological and agricultural sciences; 11% in engineering; 10% in the social and behavioral sciences; 6% in mathematics, statistics, or computer sciences; and 3% in the physical sciences." https://nsf.gov/statistics/2018/nsb20181/report/sections/higher-education-in-science-and-engineering/undergraduate-education-enrollment-and-degrees-in-the-united-states
Dr. Regina Ciphrah @ Verbalizing Visions
01:59:06
As Tiffany mentioned, getting involved with science education leadership is important. In South Carolina, our organization is SCSELA https://sites.google.com/view/scsela
Heidi Schweingruber
01:59:07
+1 Mark -- the power of local alliances of teachers.
Kirk Brown
01:59:27
I believe we need to get science on the state assessment dashboard. That will be the driver we need to ensure we are at the same level of Math and ELA
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
01:59:37
I really like the idea of a Federal report card - K-16. States are competitive with each other!
Ted Willard
01:59:38
I also suggest that science teaching organizations get the science communities in your states to advocate for science education. Unfortunately, they often have more sway than science teachers.
Mary Loesing
01:59:47
In NY we have a Consortium of science professional organizations where we advocate for quality science education with our stated education department, our Board of Regents, and our state legislators.
Brian Hamilton
01:59:50
@AMS Thanks for the data!
Julie Olds
01:59:56
Diverse Science assessment standards at the state level
AMS Education Program
02:00:10
Sorry bout that, link didn’t come over: try again. How to bring a NWS meteorologist into your classroom for free. https://www.noaa.gov/education/stories/video-conference-with-meteorologist-in-your-classroom
Jim Short
02:00:32
A group of science organizations in CA are meeting next month to discuss the Call to Action and draft ideas they want to share with state policymakers. How could you start similar conversations in your states?
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
02:00:35
Love the emphasis of preservice science teaching education
Wendi Vogel
02:00:36
This is a bit off topic, but as educators, we often do not know who to go to, where to go, and then how to advocate.
Joan
02:00:37
Skype with a scientist is amazing! My students love it!
Abrianna Moore
02:00:50
Send a letter to your state representatives about your concerns with science education and the reforms you hope to see in your state.
Jodi L. Peterson
02:01:04
Wendi,NSTA is gearing up to help you with advocacy
Heidi Schweingruber
02:01:10
@Wendi -- I think NSTA is going to help with developing some tools for teachers to work as advocates.
Dylan Harvey
02:01:15
I second Skype with a Scientist as an amazing resource!
Alicia Lorenzo
02:01:42
Teaching in a bilingual class, I find that my biggest challenge is finding materials that meet our curriculum standards in dual language. If programs are out there, my students don't always have access to the online programs because of their language skills.
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
02:01:46
Slides are in the collection: https://my.nsta.org/collection/evTC_sWWR2mU_E
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
02:02:15
I’d love to incorporate Skype with a scientist but what I’m able to do is have virtual science presentations with BREEF (our environmental foundation here in the Bahamas)
Wendi Vogel
02:02:23
Excellent. We have started some work in MI, but we have been reaching out to groups that know how. It's a thing.
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:03:15
Is there a sample email that we can use & revise?
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:03:24
You are doing Amazing work!
Jodi L. Peterson
02:03:34
Your voice is critical. if you are interested in helpling in this effort, please send me an email jpeterson@nsta.org
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
02:03:46
Call to Action Report: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/call-to-action-for-science-education
Mark Meszaros
02:03:53
Thank you for all the links.
Jane Jackson
02:04:17
How can the U.S. Dept. of Education be convinced to re-instate a 2.55 seaside in each state’s formula grant, for higher ed competitive grants for LOCAL PD and prioritize SCIENCE teachers?
Heidi Schweingruber
02:04:25
They are meeting this Friday in CA!
dan vincent
02:04:26
agreed. talking directly with your state lawmakers is key. there needs to be a relationship...tell your story
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:04:46
+1 Dan Good to see you, friend!
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
02:04:58
Keep science museums in your thoughts. We are will you, hoping to support your teaching.
dan vincent
02:05:02
you too Tiffany! so proud of you!
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:05:29
+ K Johnson spot on! Museums do play a key role in advocacy and alliance work!
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
02:06:00
Yay!
Julia Hawthorne
02:06:13
Very informative! Thank you
Allegra
02:06:19
Thank you
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:06:36
Thank you very much! Great session.
marneeramos
02:06:53
anyone know of great phenomena websites?
Emine Sadıkoğlu
02:07:22
Thank you very much!!!!
Barbra Buoy
02:07:26
Wonderful presentation. Thank you so much!
Joan
02:07:27
Thank you so much! A lot to process!
Theresa Parisi
02:07:28
Thank you! Very inspiring to keep working on the work!
Allegra
02:07:40
NGSS has a lot of phennomena
Mona Forbes
02:07:43
Possible phenomena list: https://thewonderofscience.com/phenomenal
Rachel Kennerly
02:07:56
https://drive.google.com/drive/u/2/folders/1TrnUTFDY3ZWFRI-ev-ilOF2Bq7S_-Y0a
Amador, Gloria
02:07:58
Thank you very much , we were inspired and empowered today !
Ellen
02:08:05
Another phenomena website specific to Iowa but probably useful in other state https://phenomena.iowapbs.org/
Ted Willard
02:08:34
Phenomena! DA DA da da da
Lara Roketenetz
02:08:42
Informal science orgs have been very hard hit financially due to the pandemic and many are closing permanently. These spaces are critical for STEM experiential learning especially for urban schools.
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:08:47
@Ted!!! Yes!!
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:09:04
We have had a ton of feedback recommending that the Math Science Partnership funding be returned :)
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
02:09:24
Excellent presentation guys, I’m excited to see what I can implement here in The Bahamas
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:09:31
+++ Lara. We can carry that message foward.
Jane Jackson
02:09:45
I meant to say “2.5% seaside in Title II-A” in the US Dept. of Education.
dan vincent
02:09:46
providing
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:09:51
Please keep us informed of the work you are doing in the Bahamas Lettia!
kathy venable
02:09:58
Thank you, excited for the toolkit!!
Kelli Grabowski - STEM Coord. CABOCES
02:09:58
Yes! A toolkit! I'm in!
Joan
02:10:09
Yes toolkit!!
dan vincent
02:10:23
providing more 'accountability' at the elementary level with testing is a double-edged sword. thoughts on why that level is important?
dan vincent
02:10:35
*lever
Ted Willard
02:10:49
As Jerry Maguire says: Help us help you!
Heidi Schweingruber
02:10:51
hschweingruber@nas.edu
Joan
02:11:16
Rachel it says access denied
Ted Willard
02:11:22
no tests, not teaching. it really is that simple
Mark Meszaros
02:11:27
Looking back to the Sputnik era, one area of funding was helping science instructors to get MS degrees in science AND they also funded the Woodrow Wilson Foundation that brought together the best and brightest science teachers to come together and exchange ideas and develop PD for other teachers. Teacher teaching teachers is powerful.
Alicia Lorenzo
02:11:27
I feel that providing accountability in the lower grades will set the foundation for students preparation in the middle school.
Elizabeth (Liz) Petersen
02:12:02
Yep @Ted
Rachel Kennerly
02:12:12
Joan here is the web linkhttp://stemteachingtools.org/assets/landscapes/STT42_Using_Phenomena_in_NGSS.pdf
kathy venable
02:12:16
we start tracking local science data in 3rd grade so that we can see the growth by the time our Georgia state milestones in 5th grade.
Ramon Benavidez
02:12:39
Just trying to survive especially when you are in Texas and specifically along the US / Mexico Borderlands within El Paso TX. However, this seminar has giving me hope to continue push forward.
Jim Short
02:13:10
@Mark, love the idea of strategies to attract the best and brightest to want to be science teachers
Heidi Schweingruber
02:13:22
@Ramon -- we are thinking about this as an ongoing, long term effort. We know things are very difficult right now in many schools and districts. We will keep advancing this work over the next year at least!
AMS Education Program
02:13:34
Hang in there Ramon!
Isabel Borges
02:13:41
In the EU schools we have similar issues, we need to develop science education PD for early years educators
marneeramos
02:14:31
Thank you!
Brian Hamilton
02:14:31
This may have been previously addressed but I have found that the science classroom can have a positive impact on the ELA and math classroom and test scores. In my building we have shown greater than a years growth in student reading levels that can be attributed to the work in the science classroom. Has their been any attempts to better link that in the policy?
Brian Hamilton
02:14:39
And thanks!
Sarah Ruggiero Kirby (she/her)
02:14:40
Thank you!
Heidi Schweingruber
02:14:42
Fantastic conversation in chat! Thank you everyone for your energy!
Ramon Benavidez
02:14:47
Thank you
Jean Roloff
02:14:48
Thank you!!
Mark Meszaros
02:14:51
Kudus to NAS for carefully wording the recommendations.
Lettia L. M. Strachan (Tialms)
02:14:53
Yes, thanks so much
Takisha Webb-Kosh
02:14:55
Thank you!
Melissa Sleeper
02:14:55
Thank you, this was a great presentation!
AMS Education Program
02:14:56
Thank you all for this important work and sharing it!
Joan
02:14:59
Thank you!
Luke Larson
02:14:59
👏
Lara Roketenetz
02:15:03
Thanks!
Amanda Sciarpelletti
02:15:04
Thank you
Elmarie Mortimer
02:15:07
Thank you!
Cathie
02:15:08
thank you
Mary Loesing
02:15:12
Thank you
Ana G Mena
02:15:14
Thank you so much for everything!
cflaherty
02:15:14
Great webinar! Thank you for the discussion:)
K Johnson Chicago Botanic Garden
02:15:16
Thank you!
Tiffany Neill - OK
02:15:21
Thank you, everyone! Such a pleasure being with you tonight. You make the biggest difference in the lives of our students. If you haven’t heard it enough lately, we really appreciate all you do!
Erika Shugart, NSTA
02:15:22
Ramon - NSTA will be meeting in TX in the spring. Hopefully you can join us for more inspiration!
Jim Short
02:15:24
Thank you all for joining us tonight to learn about the Call to Action for Science Education
Karen Ralph
02:15:31
Thank you!
Erika Shugart, NSTA
02:15:43
Thank you to our amazing speakers and participants!!
Flavio Mendez, NSTA
02:15:45
Collection: https://my.nsta.org/collection/evTC_sWWR2mU_E
Wendi Vogel
02:15:59
Thank you for all of this amazing work, your time, and your passion! Enjoy the rest of the week!
Mike Harshbarger
02:16:13
Thank you. I have a little more hope that things may change.
Nicole Durso
02:16:16
Excellent, thanks!!
Isabel Borges
02:16:18
Thank very much!