Zoom Logo

TACTYC Conference 2020 - Shared screen with speaker view
elizabethcarruthers
01:04:09
Welcome all and good morning
Rebecca Webb
01:04:17
Good morning Sam! How lovely to see you.
Paulette Luff
01:04:30
Good morning - exciting to be here1
Faith's iPad
01:05:15
Good morning everyone
Kathryn Solly
01:14:34
Morning all,
Kathryn Solly
01:15:02
Morning all, Great to be here and participating.
Viki Veale
01:15:29
welcome Kathryn- great to have you
Viki Veale
01:17:40
Don't forget to share your ideas and thoughts throughout the presentation using the chat facility as Angela has just said. You can either message privately to TACTYC or to everyone if you are willing to share.
Penny Borkett
01:18:37
So wonderful to have all with us today. Welcome everyone.
Zoé Clarke Milne
01:18:58
hi everyone, can anyone tell me when the anji play will be on? sorry if this has already been mentioned
Penny Borkett
01:19:31
Nots sure what you mean Zoe
Viki Veale
01:20:11
The AGM is at 12:-)
TACTYC Association
01:20:43
Do check your gallery view and change to speaker view
TACTYC Association
01:21:26
thank you for keeping on mute
Zoé Clarke Milne
01:21:48
I thought there was going to be a presentation from anji play at some point. can’t seem to find the info on it now
Penny Borkett
01:22:39
The keynote is on now and there is discussion with delegates about professional identy.
Viki Veale
01:22:56
Ah, sorry Zoe!
TACTYC Association
01:22:58
paying attention is so powerful! who pays attention to who?
Kathryn Solly
01:24:04
It is wonderful that TACTYC has funded this research for the MNS. The jewels in the crown but so often forgotten b
Penny Borkett
01:24:18
Its is a very relevant these at the moment for so many.
Viki Veale
01:25:48
So powerful to LISTEN to rather than lead what people are saying!
Barbara Isaacs
01:26:13
Thank you Kathryn for reminding us of the importance of the MNS and their role in providing quality of nursery education for all children
Penny Borkett
01:26:53
How do delegates feel about whether or not they are really listened to in the workforce?
Froebel Trust
01:27:24
Loving the allusion to Janet Moyles' wonderful article on passion and paradox...
Viki Veale
01:27:26
I think the latest release about funding provides evidence towards that
Viki Veale
01:27:32
Me too sasha!
TACTYC Association
01:28:33
Early Years Practice ...the corner stone towards social mobility ...what a powerful point!
Janet Moyles
01:29:13
I’m really sad to see that since I wrote Passion, Paradox and Professionalism in the Early Years, little seems to have moved us forwards. How do we convince successive governments? Perhaps now with the mention of ‘catching up’ for some children, we can make another stand?
Helen Moylett
01:29:38
this reminds me of Nancy Kline's work (not EY) She makes 2 assumptions 1.Evrything we do depends on the thinking we do first 2. Our thinking depends on the quality of our attention for each other. and then she says 'perhaps the most important thing we could do with our life and with our leadership was to listen to people so expertly. to give them attention so respectfully they would begin to think for themselves, clearly and afresh. ' This applies to research as well as teaching young children and possibly to how we work with others in our wonderful but potentially divided sector
Christina MacRae
01:30:22
When I started teaching in London MNS school 35 years ago we were having the same discussion, we were lobbying MPs at Westminster: the difference today is the vast reduction in MNS on the ground and their ability to maintain their attentive provision despite the reduction in funding that has accompanied austerity ……
Viki Veale
01:30:23
It would be wonderful if we could wouldn't it Janet. I think this point about many practitioners having degrees but these not being valued in the same way is particularly pertinent
Jane
01:30:47
Progress was being made, but there has been a downward trend since 2010, worse sine 2015, in terms of recognition and development of the workforce
Helen Moylett
01:30:55
Janet we cannot convince DfE - more then ever they think they know and have adopted the M Gove 'blob' approach to us so we have to inspire courage in ourselves sand others to subvert their agenda and refuse when appropriate
Kerry Payne
01:31:52
I think it is such an embedded injustice in the early years to not be listened to. I think we need to further encourage practitioners to become more outspoken. I think there is also a lot of nuance. Often the early years practitioner is referred to in a universal way, but we need to be heard across different domains and roles. My PhD research (in application stage) is exploring key persons voice in SEND intervention. Another forgotten voice.
Nikki Fairchild
01:32:15
I think the big challenge was the change in language from Government. We now hear 'childcare' which suggests providing a route for parental employment which negates the richness of Early Childhood Education and Care
Janet Moyles
01:32:58
Early Childhood is always the area that suffers when there’s any form of recession!
Viki Veale
01:33:04
Hear Hear Helen Moylett- this is crucial!
Elaine W
01:33:07
I think you have made a valid point there Nikki
TACTYC Association
01:33:17
Accountability, Responsibility language is power laiden
Viki Veale
01:33:33
Absolutely Nikki!
Kerry Payne
01:35:01
I also think whilst we need to openly object against the government’s blatant disregard, there is sometimes a tendency to become hooked into the negativity. I think it leads to practitioners losing hope. We need to sharing good news stories of how our workforce continually advocates for children despite the challenges. I think agency through adversity is a key skill for many settings.
Penny Borkett
01:35:15
Inclusion should be a concept and principle for all children. Yet a lot of the time it seems as if it is considered to be about individual groups of children.
Sue
01:35:30
Helen your point about Nancy Kline also resonates with Hilary Cottam's excellent book Radical Help, which questions the foundations not just of child care but the Welfare state, education, employment, social care etc.
Chris Gomez
01:35:41
I agree Nikki, the terminology used to describe ECEC is very important in relation to its status and purpose. Schools have also been become places for minding children so that parents/carers can work. I think our voices can be heard but I am finding that I need to shout louder and louder!
Sue Palmer
01:35:48
Here in Scotland we have a much more sympathetic approach from Education Scotland and the Early Years sector at Scottish government,, But once children begin school (P1 is the equivalent of YR) the attitude changes... At present, there are real moves towards a more coherent EY policy (3-7yrs) but there's still a strong cultural assumption that 'school' (with its emphasis on 3Rs) is important but nursery is 'just looking after little children'.
Elaine W
01:35:49
Agree Carla - many Early Years folk go above and beyond for the children and families they work with - they value the individuality
Helen Moylett
01:35:59
our colleagues in PVI parts of the sector have to have engage with govt on economic policy to try and convince the Treasury to keep them viable. this is crucial for survival for many excellent small settings but it means that the arguments centre on economics and the needs of parents rather then the rights of children to more than juts childcare to enable parents to work
Barbara Isaacs
01:36:10
have an opportunity to engage parents in demonstrating to the Government that ECh practitioners offer enormous value to the early childhood community by fostering children's attitudes to learning - by enabling them to be active social beings who are moving from the home environment to the social environment of the community where each person is valued and appreciated to what they have to offer.
elizabethcarruthers
01:36:17
The problem is we have to watch the Nursery Schools do not get an imbalanced proportion of children with special needs because they are so accommodating.
Penny Borkett
01:36:57
It is sad Elizabeth that this is the case. I have worked with many different settings that provide amazing care for children with SEND.
Christina MacRae
01:37:08
the rising percentages of SEND children in MNS directly related the the increase in for-profit childcare and the a target driven curriculum upon which settings are held accountable …..
alisonmoore
01:37:43
This resonates with my own research of listening to practitioner and parent voice in Children's Centres
Kathryn Solly
01:37:47
I was awarded the Unilever Fellowship to look at early years leadership and management in 2006. It covered the whole phase and I was able to visit many settings and schools. The passion, drive and pedagogical professionalism was very much alive then but folk felt there was no national leadership for early childhood nor political respect for it either. We are again recognising this through this great research but how is this going to be taken forward to ensure that the MNS and other high quality in early childhood grows and prospers particularly as we face further’ tinkering’ with the EYFS and the vast challenge of the pandemic?
Viki Veale
01:38:17
Thank you Kerry Payne- that it such a valid point!
Viki Veale
01:40:05
Sue Palmer, I think English politicians could learn a lot from what is going on in the rest of the British isles!
Jackie Musgrave
01:40:19
it resonates with my research too, practitioners went beyond their ‘day job’ to ensure they developed inclusive environments for children with chronic health conditions - exactly what Carla has just said - everything for the child to improve their wellbeing and health
Helen Moylett
01:42:16
Thanks Sue P for mentioning Scotland - it is complete nonsense that we have different policy across UK. When you read the Curriculum for Excellence and the Welsh foundation phase (which goes to 7) the language about children and their agency as learners is very different from England!
Karen Boardman
01:42:42
Thank you for tweeting!
Viki Veale
01:43:25
Would anyone like to raise a question for Carla and Rebecca
Sue Palmer
01:43:38
I fear that the rhetoric from English politicians and Ofsted still affects the attitude of politicians, the general public and the media.
jmmurra
01:43:38
Good points Helen Moylett and Sue Palmer! Do colleagues from Wales have a view on what happens in Welsh schools for children from age 7?
Elaine W
01:43:59
I worry about where ch and families might go now if settings are forced to close due to financial constraints, it was challenging for PVI settings before C19 due to 'free hours' funding
Kerry Payne
01:45:35
THANK GOODNESS
Kerry Payne
01:46:30
I said this last night on an Instagram chat. Women’s work in the EY are largely overlooked.
Kerry Payne
01:46:54
I use the term care because it is not a term to be ashamed of. It is a phenomenal skill.
Christina MacRae
01:47:45
careful pedagogies is a feminist concern …..
Kate Barker
01:48:01
absolutely Kerry
Kerry Payne
01:48:33
I sadly have a broken mic!!!
Nancy Stewart
01:49:29
There was a period when the Labour government said the terminology should be early years 'provision' to avoid the too-long ECEC, while acknowledging the impossibility of splitting education and care.
Barbara Isaacs
01:49:31
I absolutely support Kerry's view ECh is about care which supports educations - children need to feel cared for to be able to learn
Tonis Iphone
01:49:31
please could you turn off screen sharing?
Kerry Payne
01:50:46
Care and education are one and the same thing!
Nikki Fairchild
01:50:59
That's interesting Nancy, it is another paradox as I don't think we need to homogenize the ECEC sector but maybe a shared language would help the public face of ECEC
Kerry Payne
01:51:23
Children need to feel safe and secure to learn, therefore caregiving is a skill not a natural talent.
Jane
01:51:28
In England, the ECEC sector is treated by the government as simply a series of slots to be filled as efficiently and cheaply as possible. It reflects a lack of respect for young children.
dcchandrika
01:51:38
Inconsistent understanding and use of the titles across settings - does it impact on professional status of early childhood educators
Nikki Fairchild
01:51:39
and building on Kerry's point ECEC reclaiming their profession
Ruth Churchill Dower
01:51:46
Victoria Lawson has done some great work on exploring and naming the empathetic, emotional, care responsibilities that EYs professionals bring. https://faculty.washington.edu/lawson/research.html
Kathryn Solly
01:51:56
I totally agree with Kerry. The only way forwards is to unite the whole sector of early childhood.
Kate Barker
01:52:18
if there was more care in education perhaps some of our teenagers would be in a better place
Rebecca Fisk Independent
01:52:30
We could further advocate coaching and mentoring in the sector - raising professional support
jmmurra
01:53:12
Early childhood workers are busy doing their work for long hours, leaving little time to talk about it.
Kathryn Solly
01:53:15
Well said Jane Payler.
Helen Moylett
01:53:36
Agreed re skills base - practitioners can be taught to de-centre and empathise but it requires prioritising child centred rather than curriculum centred training
Kerry Payne
01:53:44
This is such a good point Rebecca. It is odd to me that one of our statutory duties is to mentor and coach practitioners through supervision, but the existence of training for this or access is very slim.
Di Chilvers
01:53:53
Absolutley agree Jane
Sam Greshoff
01:53:56
It is a lack of respect for children, I agree but this stems from a complete lack of interest in children and their development
Elaine W
01:53:58
Agreed - Pete Moorhouse started an interesting thread on this yesterday on Twitter
Caroline Guard
01:54:16
Absolutely agree Jane.
Helen Moylett
01:54:38
Supervision was put in the EYFS thanks to Clare Tickell's support for it but the training has not been available
Nancy Stewart
01:54:39
As we identify the enormous range of essential skills required for EY professionals, it is so disturbing that the proportion of entry level qualifications and none at all is growing in EY settings.
Helen Moylett
01:55:00
Agreed Nancy NDNA surveys are scarey!
Jane
01:55:51
But not surprising, given the poor funding settings are operating with and the lack of government strategy on workforce and professional development
Kerry Payne
01:56:29
I have heard the term “spinning plates” a lot recently, and we continue to have tasks added to an already huge workload. I wish we could see the workforce as united but also as acknowledging that we bring a symphony of skills. Change to me is about celebrating the diversity of skills and accepting that we don’t all need to be good at everything but all together, we make it good.
Viki Veale
01:57:13
Thank you so much for all your comments. Please do continue to post
Kerry Payne
01:59:01
I am a huge fan of supervision but doing it externally for settings, its a wasted experience where there is little to no training, or time. I read a great book by Michael Gasper and Rosie Walker that has some good ideas for realistically applying those skills in ECE practice.
Rebecca Webb
02:00:30
Thank-you everyone for your thoughtful comments and reactions to our keynote. You have given me, Carla and Sam so much further food for thought.
Sue Palmer
02:00:44
Upstart's policy in terms of trying to get attention is to draw support from as many other sectors as possible, especially public health, the arts, sustainability, social work and human/children's rights. What happens in early years underpins all of these things and many more. So we want to work together with other pressure groups to increase the volume of our voice!
Viki Veale
02:01:11
Thank you so much Carla and Rebecca- so much food for thought!
Rebecca Webb
02:01:57
Great point about developing care and empathy Rod.
elizabethcarruthers
02:02:38
Yes, I agree Sue we need to to increase our voice and collaborate.
Viki Veale
02:02:52
Great point Rod! I think unkindness captures it perfectly!
Rebecca Webb
02:03:36
Thank-you!
Helen Moylett
02:05:06
Somebody has a very loud coffee maker!!
Viki Veale
02:06:53
Don't they! We're just trying to mute everyone Hellen!
Tonis Iphone
02:09:56
I am wondering how colleagues are supporting achievement and especially opps for professional development within BAME communities. Eg, my school is in 95% Black neighbourhood. since I’ve been ( awhite) Head here (2006) we have gradually built more inclusive and effective professional representation, with citizens’ participation ( eg governors, different models of research and consultation), level 2 and 3 quals etc but all resources to support this have disappeared... any thoughts?
alisonmoore
02:10:16
My supportive husband had bagals and tea waiting
Karen Boardman
02:11:26
Sending you all virtual coffee, tea and cake!
alisonmoore
02:13:51
Excellent example of work supporting BAME communities in Birmingham with Approachable Parenting and developing Sparklers, Parent Peer Mentors.
katebrookes
02:14:51
Is the current discussion supposed to be broadcasting and recording?
Barbara Isaacs
02:17:13
Do engage with parents - politicians will listen to them - they are voters
Helen Moylett
02:19:05
Sorry I didn't speak when you mentioned my name - wasn't sure whether you wanted me to contribute there and then!
Ruth Beck
02:20:04
Going back to the point about language, I believe that it is crucial to create a counter-discourse to the government rhetoric of 'free childcare' to give more value to the EY sector and by inference practitioners working with young children. Getting away from the loaded and often misinterpreted terms of 'care' and 'education' would be a start, some other curriculums use alternative terms such as 'belonging' and 'involvement'.
Tonis Iphone
02:21:52
I agree about potential power of shared, recognisable language ... but I think our titles must be meaningful to people outside the profession
Viki Veale
02:22:20
Thank you Helen- sorry, I should I have been clearer
Viki Veale
02:22:48
We are saving the chat so we can capture everyone's voices :-)
Elaine W
02:22:53
Agreed Penny - lots of lip service !
Vania A.
02:23:13
Politicians, directors, managers, etc. A shift on policies and mindsets is needed. Not only in the public sector but also in the private.
Janet Moyles
02:23:33
Care in any sector is undervalued and deemed ‘unskilled’. Having been told you are ‘unskilled’ and ‘we don’t want you here’ in terms of Care Home carers in particular, I would like to hear views on how we get away from this highly skilled profession of caring being deemed low level work. Is it just that it’s a feminist issue?
Tonis Iphone
02:24:01
thanks Alison Moore for link
Jane
02:24:04
Barbara Isaacs makes a very good point about the importance of engaging parents in the lobbying for better ECEC recognition
Viki Veale
02:24:19
Absolutely Janet! Jane, you made this point very well too
Barbara Isaacs
02:25:11
Over 100 years ago Montessori talked about the importance of attention - to the child as well as of the child to their activities. We need to work together across the whole sector to have the voice of the child heard
Nikki Fairchild
02:25:50
Janet, I suspect it is linked to capitalist views of 'productivity' and human capital. It is more challenging to 'measure' care and caring than tot test knowledge and understanding.
Sam Greshoff
02:25:51
Thank you Barbara, we have to work together in order to be heard.
Viki Veale
02:25:57
Thank you to those who have shared links and book recommendations. Do please keep sharing- as Rod said, this is great CPD!
Christina MacRae
02:26:25
attention is a very important concept, but it is also important to remember that WHAT we pay attention to is hoped by the ecology that we find ourselves responding to ….
Rebecca Fisk Independent
02:26:26
I had the pleasure of listening to and sharing the voices of Reception teachers in how they supported children to progress in language in 'Diving for Pearls' - link on my website - their passion really shows through their case studies
alisonmoore
02:26:56
TACTYC gave me the opportunity to share my early ideas for my PhD and has continued to support me throughout my journey. Thank you TACTYC
Viki Veale
02:27:21
Thank you so much Alison- we are lucky to have your voice
Helen Moylett
02:29:03
Barbara - the Montessori parents survey is certainly worth sharing more widely -their views on the need for more creativity in nurseries and schools are powerful
Rebecca Fisk Independent
02:29:35
I agree Elizabeth - Action research is so powerful
Viki Veale
02:30:07
hear hear Elizabeth!
Rod Parker-Rees
02:30:42
Creativity is so important - professionals need to be willing to adopt a 'playful' approach to interpreting policy - to fit it to the particular needs of individual people
Tonis Iphone
02:31:18
love that Stenhouse quote
Zanni
02:31:36
I agree with Rob. It has helped me during lockdown.
Helen Moylett
02:32:15
Rod and Zanni I agree we can change the world by being the change we want to see and know to be right
Rosa Trout
02:32:41
absolutely Wendy!
Viki Veale
02:33:15
Absolutely!
Patricia’s iPad
02:33:48
I completely agree with Wendy!!
Ruth Churchill Dower
02:33:54
Rod - I agree and many settings worth their salt will do this, but it is hard to achieve when an assessment culture is so prevalent.
alisonmoore
02:33:56
sad recently to read that practitioner's reluctance to use Zoom and virtual platforms e.g. reading a story to their children, was interpreted by their manager as a lack of committment and not a confidence and training need
Kathryn Solly
02:34:29
I went up in the world when I really trained to become a MNS teacher and then HT. The children were what mattered then and still matter now. We must get it right for them and continue to challenge the politicians and their structures with high quality research and pedagogical professional questioning on their behald.
Jane
02:34:36
Losing strong, funded local authority ECEC departments has been a terrible blow to professional learning and development
Shannon Ludgate
02:34:55
Alison - the transition to using technology is challenging for many. Often misunderstood as reluctance/stubbornness
Christina MacRae
02:35:02
respectful practice means we should learn from children …. that IS research.. curiosity and responsive practice IS research … we need to value the funds of knowledge held by those marginalised by dominant constructions of knowledge ….
alisonmoore
02:35:13
Agree Shannon
Rebecca Fisk Independent
02:35:31
Thanks Nancy - a hopeful message
Nikki Fairchild
02:35:44
agreed Christina
Rod Parker-Rees
02:35:57
Perhaps the most important thing is to find ways to make space for people to share values and concerns. Pressures of work can make it realy difficult to fit this in
elizabethcarruthers
02:36:10
I hear your Kathryn Solly. I feel your pain.
Jan Georgeson
02:36:17
I agree, Shannon - we need to be kind to those who find technology challenging
Corfield
02:36:52
I agree Nancy, great times for LA and EY
Kathryn Solly
02:37:24
Thanks Elizabeth. The pain can be useful as it helps us focus upon what really matters.
Shannon Ludgate
02:37:32
Indeed, Jan. Time is required to support all practitioners in developing their technological confidence. It cannot be an expectation to feel competent overnight. Time, however, is often limited.
Christina MacRae
02:37:33
I agree Rob, making space, and creating convivial spaces which can hold difference - which is exactly what so many MNS do is NOT recognised ….
Sue Palmer
02:37:45
Re encouraging confidence, Upstart has a closed Facebook page for the P1/2 practitioners who are desperately trying to introduce play-based pedagogy (often in the teeth of opposition from senior management). It's run by our Vice-Chair, Kate Johnston, who is a retired MNS teacher with huge skill in helping the participants support each other! There are now nearly 7000 participants.
Rod Parker-Rees
02:38:29
That sounds fab Sue
Sue Palmer
02:38:41
Kate is fab!
Zoe Lewis
02:38:45
Yes, teaching early years in school can be a lonely place. TACTYC is an important source of support.
elizabethcarruthers
02:38:53
Hi Sue Palmer so very much thanks for joining us today from Scotland and thanks for all your comments
Kathryn Solly
02:39:05
KEYU is acting as an important interconnection for so many practitioners. It needs more wise voices so please join. Its free and share your expertise.
elizabethcarruthers
02:39:30
Hi Toni Glazzard,
alisonmoore
02:40:04
I was invited to publish recently alongside many of my colleagues here today to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the UNCRC. Thank you for the support and confidence to share parent stories from my research
Viki Veale
02:40:46
Congratulations Alison!
alisonmoore
02:41:01
I am proud of my time as a Childminder and at the time a Sponsored Childminder supporting many children in need
elizabethcarruthers
02:41:03
Hi Toni Glazzard so good to have a Nurser School headteacher here and commenting with such knowledge of on the ground practice…thanks Toni
Tonis Iphone
02:41:30
🙏
Viki Veale
02:42:16
Home based childcare is so important for children and parents, its so sad how numbers are dropping due to financial challenges
Christina MacRae
02:44:01
Pandemic should teach us that it is a valuable way to educare for children ….
Viki Veale
02:44:22
absolutely Christina
Elaine W
02:45:28
I am Head of EY & Childcare for a training provider delivering apprenticeships - it is challenging to recruit due to low pay (apprentices typically earn nat min wage) but also apprentices being released for training from the setting
elizabethcarruthers
02:45:32
Yes I agree with you childminding was my choice of care and education when my children were young. There was such a cosy and listening atmosphere.
Rod Parker-Rees
02:45:47
It is particularly difficult to support the development of a collegial profession in a climate of commercial competition - worry about staff being poached if they get training!
Viki Veale
02:46:19
It's surprisingly common sadly:-(
alisonmoore
02:46:57
Early Years Networks are essential to supporting the sector and trying to see beyond the business competition
Rosa Trout
02:48:14
While government insist on calling it free funding, and pay such pittance it will be difficult to change!
Vania A.
02:48:28
Absolutely
dcchandrika
02:48:37
Everyone loves their children , but does this reflect in respecting child carers
Cath Evans
02:49:17
I agree it is difficult to work together when settings are in a marketplace. Staff in maintained settings have local authority pay scales. It would be wonderful to see the whole sector valued with progression for staff in all settings and this is linked to pay which then leads to issues around funding.
jmmurra
02:50:05
Great point dcchandrika - I do believe that most parents respect and trust their own child care workers. We have to find a way to move this from micro-level to macro-level
Jan Georgeson
02:50:05
Thanks, Sarah. It is important to find out what cpd that members of the profession need - not just giving them what is available!
Sarah Lightfoot
02:50:07
I’d like to recommend McDowall and Murray (2012) Reconceptualising leadership in EY. incredibly useful in my own doctoral work which involve resining a programme of support to enable all practitioners to develop and innovate in their work.
alisonmoore
02:50:07
Good practice model in Birmingham of Early Years Partnerships across the sector and developing a shared voice
elizabethcarruthers
02:50:21
Yes, in a nutshell, we need real government investment.
Viki Veale
02:53:50
Thank you Sarah Lightfoot
Viki Veale
02:53:55
Agreed Elizabeth
Rosa Trout
02:54:20
yes totally political!
Viki Veale
02:56:18
Well said Helen!
Sarah Vipond - Paterson
02:56:21
i agree Alison the practice model in Birmingham is amazing
Elaine W
02:56:27
Agree with 'hair and care' - got a lot of that when I had students come to enrol at FE level!
Tonis Iphone
02:56:30
yes! to current speaker re collecting and presenting what works
Kathryn Solly
02:56:37
Totally agree Helen B. Outdoors is so important. Politics is crucial and we need to lobby. I was originally a secondary teacher and retrained because I could see what needed to be secure to prevent the effects on secondary aged young people. Celebrate, celebrate, celebrate early childhood….
Tonis Iphone
02:58:34
to current speaker- this is SO diverse, impossible to say what children’s experiences of lockdown have been
Tonis Iphone
02:59:28
thank goodness...
mennagodfrey
02:59:31
Agree about the significance of play Natalie and play outdoors even better. Sadly this has not been the experience of many during lockdown
Christina MacRae
02:59:53
Strong role for councils in terms of equality and diversity: devolved powers are is that this needs to be happening …
Janet Rose
03:00:07
If political lobbying isn't working, what about lobbying largescale organisations who are going to potentially save money on office space etc. with the likely increase in the WFH in the post-pandemic world - their workers can't WFH if their children aren't still in a setting etc. - source to increase funding for EY? I know of one giant accountancy firm who are going to close many of their offices saving literally millions of pounds a year.....
Kerry Payne
03:01:02
Controversial but I do think that as schools tend to be more in awe at the benefits of outdoors and play during Covid, they mustn’t forget and recognise that early years practitioners have been doing this for a very long time, without adequate support from the government. Using social media especially Instagram, there appears to be a lot of schools being praised for doing things that EY does as standard. Comes back to the point of EY practitioners being at the bottom of the hierarchy.
Sarah Vipond - Paterson
03:01:03
Sharron I totally agree
Viki Veale
03:01:41
Thank you so much Sharon for speaking about the need to unify as a sector and to work towards improving equality and diversity within it
Viki Veale
03:02:14
Well said Kerry!
Helen Moylett
03:02:58
Birmingham has many strengths in race and diversity and in EY is supported by local HE. My own knowledge of CREC's work sees their support for diverse leaders and leadership skills
alisonmoore
03:03:26
Agree Helen
Shannon Ludgate
03:03:32
Agreed, Helen
mennagodfrey
03:04:12
totally agree Kerry, really frustrating as the leader of a mainly outdoor setting
Rosa Trout
03:05:13
just want to say huge thanks to Early Learning Alliance for being so vocal and campaigning during Covid! The financial treatment of early years sector was a disgrace and I know of settings that had to close!
Tonis Iphone
03:05:18
re ‘time to talk’; we’ve been catapulted into more tech-savvy ways of working by the 🦠- I’m hopeful we’re creating more time to talk through this
Kerry Payne
03:05:19
I have seen lots of reinventing of the wheel and that does reinforce the divide rather than support collaboration. It is great that schools embrace play but don’t forget how tirelessly practitioners advocate for it.
Chris Gomez
03:07:05
It is interesting how the COVID situation has raised different opportunities for sharing ideas and also for thinking about ECEC in contrasting ways.
Tonis Iphone
03:07:28
I tried this in schools but a qualified teachers very 😡
mennagodfrey
03:07:55
One head teacher that I spoke with talked about Covid giving her the opportunity to use ‘early years principles throughout school’
Rosa Trout
03:07:58
yes I agree Margaret Carr always insisted on calling early years staff teachers!
Tonis Iphone
03:08:01
brilliant point about measuring care
Viki Veale
03:08:05
well said Jane- we need QTS to be awarded to EYT's to promote better understanding of the qualification
Jan Georgeson
03:08:16
Yes, Toni; this has been one of the good things to come out of the new ways of working. We need to make sure we find ways to include everyone in these opportunities. I am very much aware that lone workers have to work harder than everyone else to join in the conversations
Kerry Payne
03:08:36
I understand the intent behind June’s approach but I am not a teacher, I find the term limiting, I am a caregiver who educates. Coming back to the foundation of what we do, we provide the social and emotional conditions for learning.
Froebel Trust
03:08:42
Measuring anything can become very dangerous, care just being one concept
Kate Barker
03:09:11
where would you start measuring care?
Cath Evans
03:09:14
We talk about all staff as teachers to children and families and often refer to staff as keypeople. But equally I understand people have concerns about protecting the qualification and status of teachers with moves to use unqualified teachers.
Helen Moylett
03:09:23
I agree re measuring as baseline shows!
Kerry Payne
03:09:24
However, I know so many people disagree with me on that one. But I think we need to raise the meaning of the word caregiver. It is not a dirty word, it is a hugely important role and set of skills.
Rod Parker-Rees
03:09:24
Agree - may be better to value than to measure
Stella Louis
03:09:36
We already measure too much.
Elaine W
03:09:51
Methinks we need another opportunity to meet again as a group online to continue the discussion? Or can we all add to Twitter?
elizabethcarruthers
03:09:58
yes Vikki EYT’s need to be awarded QTS now! I I think we could take the government to court over the EYT issue.
Rod Parker-Rees
03:10:02
And meaasuring always leads to skewing!
Lucy Rodriguez Leon
03:10:08
We began the conference hearing about the valuable research into MNS and the contribution they make to the sector and society. Yet, leading on from Jaynes comments, my understandings is (and please correct me if I’m wrong) is that MNS can only employ those holding QTS in teacher roles, not EYPs or EYTs.So I wondering, in our advocacy work, how we reconcile the fight to keep MNS and promote these settings as leaders of practice with advocacy for parity of status and pay for EYPs and EYTs.How does the panel see the intersection of these debates?
Kate Barker
03:10:09
Value yes, then perhaps we wouldn't need to worry so much about education or care
Cath Evans
03:10:13
Yes I will just need to get a headset
Sarah Lightfoot
03:10:25
maybe instead of measuring we look at the impact of care
Cath Evans
03:10:40
ready hen you are ready
Kerry Payne
03:10:42
It sounds maybe bold, but we are more than teachers
Rebecca Fisk Independent
03:10:44
Important not to exclude EYFS teachers in schools in conversation as many issues from today also relate to them in my experience, such as not being heard in the voices of the schools at times.
Stella Louis
03:11:05
Bring back the NNEB
Karen Vincent
03:11:06
A shared language is vital - the word teacher really needs reconceptualising
Christina MacRae
03:11:09
The word education come from Latin: ‘educate’ - care is already in the concept of education - right from the beginning!
Kerry Payne
03:11:31
it might be that Karen, it needs to reconceptualised.
Chris Gomez
03:12:23
Yes Stella the NNEB provided such a good foundation for working with children and amazing that it is still regarded highly!
Jan Georgeson
03:12:46
Agreed, Rebecca. EYFS teachers in schools can sometimes feel like lone workers in their school!
Kerry Payne
03:12:53
I always say to people, it isn’t what you call me, it is how you treat and value me. Calling EY teachers doesn’t necessarily change attitudes.
jmmurra
03:13:19
I agree @FroebelTrust and others on measurement BUT measurement is the language policymakers understand. How can we find a way to recognise our ethos of care in ways that truly reflect this vital work in the ECEC sector.
Cathy Kilburn
03:14:35
I trained as a primary teacher with an early years specialism and then went on to complete Early Years Professional Status - however parents have always been confused about the early years professional status when asking about staff qualifications, some parents even questioned why we employed staff with higher qualifications.
Zoe Lewis
03:15:07
Pay and conditions need to be consistent if we are going to use the term ‘teacher’. Otherwise it’s very confusing for new entrants to the profession.
Paola Pedrelli
03:15:12
This conversation has been really interesting and I have fascinated by the fact that so many aspects have highlighted the complexity of early years. I have been doing research about the complexity of leadership and have developed a hybrid leadership model which recognises the complexity of the individual's narrative, the context they are operating in and the external environment. I was particularly interested in what Rebecca has to say about the business skills and innovation as I have based my research within organisational theory.
Sue Palmer
03:15:34
I think we all have to accept that 'play' and 'care' are 4-letter words as far as policy-makers go. Their world is based on economics, while play and care used to be available for free. The task is to change public attitudes to women's work and children's work - and show how, in a world of sex equality and dual-income families - cultural attitudes to care and play have to change.
Alice
03:15:42
In terms of where we are rallying and advocating, I have not long graduated from university, studying primary education. I did an early years specialism so I received a lot of inspiring training about the importance of early years. However, I don't think the same can be said for the rest of my primary teaching cohort. What worries me is that these teachers go on to teach young children and lead schools, despite having very little understanding of the importance of and years of research behind early years education.
Elaine W
03:15:45
In Cheshire, the word pedagogue was adopted for a while by the EY consultants team in the LA - very few people understood the name
Viki Veale
03:16:00
Zoe, I couldn't agree more!
Shannon Ludgate
03:16:12
I agree Zoe!
Jan Georgeson
03:16:15
Stories have power - I’m thinking of the way Marcus Rashford used his story to persuade. We can use stories about the importance of care to convey what we do.
alisonmoore
03:16:37
Very proud of my NNEB routes
Sue Palmer
03:16:39
I think it has to be pedagogue! The word pedagogy is gaining traction at the moment.
Sarah Vipond - Paterson
03:17:03
Very proud of my NNEB routes too
jmmurra
03:17:11
NNEB was a great qualification
alisonmoore
03:17:24
- NNEB Roots
Kerry Payne
03:17:24
I think the bigger issue at the moment is the use of the term “just”
Tonis Iphone
03:17:24
agree re quality ofNNEB
Kerry Payne
03:17:32
I am “just” a practitioner
Eleonora Teszenyi
03:17:32
I agree with a Sue Palmer... pedagogue is a good term to capture the essence.
Nathan Archer
03:17:35
I agree Jan. Stories have real power and potential to influence change.
Chris Gomez
03:17:35
Agreed Stella - really brought practice and theory together! Hands on with theory. Packed so much in the training!
Kerry Payne
03:17:41
I am “just” a nursery nurse
Di Chilvers
03:17:41
So true - Stella...proud of my NNEB it steers what I do now on children's development, thinking, talk etc
Jan Georgeson
03:18:00
New topic for TACTYC research - unpicking what is was about NNEB that made it such an effect process?
Kerry Payne
03:18:11
It comes from within and is rooted in self-belief. Practitioners feel the heaviness of attitudes towards their status.
Di Chilvers
03:18:15
Agree Jane - I used to teach on both years ago
Elaine W
03:18:16
I do think that the new L3 EYE and L2 EYP courses are trying to recreate much of the 'gold standard' of NNEB
Karen Boardman
03:18:17
yes, Jan - just thinking this too!
Helen Moylett
03:18:23
Hear hear Stella ! As a teacher moving from KS2 to Reception many years ago it was 2 colleagues with NNEB who supported me through that transition !
Viki Veale
03:18:24
Alice, that's a great point! I think the NNEB will always be the gold standard. As Stella said, one overarching name is what we need and as Eleonora has just said pedagogue could well be the best term- thank you everyone
Denise Salter
03:18:38
ME to so proud of having an NNEB
Corfield
03:18:45
so here in this discussion shows the complexity of the EYs. As someone who has worked in the PVI, LA and HEI sectors to support a wide range of leaders, practitioners and students over 20 years, I do feel sad that they we are still have conversations about the terminology and the professionalism of the EY workforce. There has been some excellent work done across the sector and we must celebrate the progress that has been made whilst acknowledging there is still work to be done, particularly with regard to funding for qualifications.
Viki Veale
03:19:15
Thank you Jane
Eleonora Teszenyi
03:19:18
Thank you, Jane. Wonderful discussion.
alisonmoore
03:19:26
Think Stella siad a lot on her recent NW Interview - Skills and knowledge that was taught over 110 observations completed. I recently pulled out my exam paper - just reminded me what a journey I have taken
jmmurra
03:19:26
Pedagogue would also be my own preference. In the UK, would it achieve wide recognition and parity with teachers' pay and conditions our sector so desperately needs?
Kerry Payne
03:19:29
Thank you so much! It was excellent.
Steph H
03:19:43
I think the new apprenticeships aren’t as good as NNEB or previous quals
mennagodfrey
03:20:20
I would love pedagogue to be understood and used
Viki Veale
03:20:49
Thank you Alison- Stella, what date was your interview?
Rosa Trout
03:21:04
thank you for today
Sue
03:21:11
Yes I agree Menna.I found Deci and Ryan's concept of 3 psychological needs - Autonomy, Competence and Relatedness to be a real eye opener, both personally and professionally, and I feel that this is relevant to this debate on several levels: It's essential for practitioners, children, parents, leaders etc to experience a sense of being empowered and respected, belonging, connecting nd mattering to others and having some agency over our lives and work. This is relevant to discussions about professional identity as well as our own individual identity and wellbeing and is even more important given Covid-19.
Jessica Pitt
03:22:46
Thank you for a very interesting morning. I have to sign off now. I have just written for more information about becoming a member of TAYCTYC
Jan Georgeson
03:23:16
Yes - I was supported through teaching practice and NQT year by NNEBs generous with their wisdom, sensitive to my novice teacher status and deeply kind.
Jane
03:23:16
Good to have you with us, Jessica!
Rebecca Fisk Independent
03:23:20
Thank you TACTYC. I am sorry but I have to go now.
Froebel Trust
03:23:34
Congratulations Kathleen!
Karen Boardman
03:23:35
Hi Jess please see the website - how to join
jmmurra
03:24:00
Congratulations Kathleen!
Lottie Hoare
03:24:10
Thanks so much to everyone. I have learned so much this morning as I have been out of touch with Early Years in recent years. So good to witness your discussion and reading suggestions. This will all help me very much with my teaching in universities also in terms of encouraging students to reflect on Early Years when they sometimes rush past those years unless they themselves have worked in that setting.
HelenBilton
03:24:11
amazing conference
Rebecca Webb
03:24:50
Huge congratulations Kathleen! What fascinating and important research.
Denise Salter
03:24:53
Great morning-thank you everyone
Penny Borkett
03:24:55
Such a privilege to work in the early years never forget that everybody.
jmmurra
03:25:03
Yes - special thanks to Angela, for leading the conference so brilliantly!
alisonmoore
03:25:38
Thank you to everyone. I am in the middle of moving house to work at UCC in Cork as Placement Manager for the EYCS Degree. In my 9 months in post I hav ebeen able to draw on the support of colleagues and people I am pround to call firends.
Froebel Trust
03:25:47
Thank you TACTYC and Nancy for your leadership. Welcome Karen as Chair x
jmmurra
03:25:52
Nancy - thank you so much for all your hard work - you have been a true professional as Chair!
Janet Rose
03:25:58
Thanks so much for an interesting conference!
jmmurra
03:26:16
Welcome to Karen as our new TACTYC Chair!
Steph H
03:26:18
thank you an eye opener for me I shall endeavour to become a member. wish I knew about you earlier.
Viki Veale
03:26:24
Thank you all for joining us. The conference video will be available in the members area on our website shortly and we will be following up on the themes from today. Do look into membership- our strength lies in our members and as today has proved, our voices are stronger when we speak together!
Federico Farini
03:26:43
thank you for the excellent conference, very well organised 👍🏻
jmmurra
03:26:49
It has been wonderful to read everyone's 'Chat' contributions
Jane
03:27:20
Alison, you will love UCC Cork! I enjoyed my time examining there
Penny Borkett
03:27:27
If people want to know more about the work of TACTYC go to the web site and you will find out more. We have a fantastic membership offer at the moment and you can join for the amazing price of £5.00.xx
Caroline Guard
03:27:31
Thank you for a great morning Tactyc. A really positive way to start the weekend. Very motivating and well organised.
Rebecca Webb
03:27:32
Well done Angela and Penny for all your extraordinary hard work in pulling off this morning. I know that you have put in hours and hours of labour. You deserve to rest well this weekend.
Rosa Trout
03:27:35
all the best Nancy take care x
Sam Greshoff
03:29:31
Thank you for a wonderful Conference
Cath Evans
03:29:52
Thank-you
Tonis Iphone
03:29:52
thank you 🙏
Sue Palmer
03:29:52
Thanks very much for letting me join in. Great conference¬
elizabethcarruthers
03:29:57
Thanks Angela, brilliant, great organiser and now trendsetter!
Nikki Fairchild
03:30:07
Thank you all for a really thought provoking conference. Congratulations to the conference team
Helen Moylett
03:30:08
I agree re Nancy - she is a continuing inspiration to me!! If anyone is interested in play as means to help children 'catch up' post Covid she will be with me delivering the though piece for the CREC learning circle on July 8th
Sarah Lightfoot
03:30:08
thank you and looking forward to webinars!
j.brierley@hull.ac.uk
03:30:09
Thank you for letting me join today
alisonmoore
03:30:13
Bye everyone, thank you for a very thoughful session. I have hundreds of boxes to empty
Federico Farini
03:30:19
thank you all Angela superb host, TACTYC and participants 🙏
Federico Farini
03:30:26
👏
Zanni
03:30:27
Thank you
Hilary Harris
03:30:28
Thanks so much for an inspiring conference
Stella Louis
03:30:28
Have a lovely weekend everyone
Sam Sutton-Tsang
03:30:31
Thank you for a great online conference!
Paola Pedrelli
03:30:34
Thank you this was so interesting and informative. I really enjoyed the presentations and comments. It was very well organised and professional. Thank you, Paola
Kate Barker
03:30:39
Is it ok to stay as an observer if you aren't a member?
Vania A.
03:30:39
Thanks for the opportunity!
Jane
03:30:44
Well done, Angela, and the conference team!
Lisa48
03:30:45
Thank you all, it was great and a BIG thank you to you Angela for asking me.
Cathy Kilburn
03:30:48
Thank you very much to everyone who was involved in organising this online conference.
Victoria Lopez
03:30:49
Thank you. A wonderful conference.
Marion Brown
03:30:51
Thanks so much - you've given me lots to think about! Great conference.
Sarah Vipond - Paterson
03:30:53
Thank you for an excellent well organised conference, very thought provoking. Well done Angela and everyone
Hayley Preston-Smith
03:30:54
Thank you so much for such a fascinating conference - it was lovely to read everyone's comments and has been very inspiring. Thank you Rebecca and Carla for your keynote presentation, it has given me further food for thought in terms of my own work. Have a lovely rest of your weekend everyone!
Vina’s iPhone
03:30:56
thank you- very interesting
Rebecca Webb
03:31:00
Well done TACTYC
mennagodfrey
03:31:00
Thanks so much, good to have a different space to think in
Ruth Churchill Dower
03:31:07
Thank you all - very interesting.
Denise Salter
03:31:14
Denise is staying
Viki Veale
03:31:16
Thank you all for joining us and thank you to Angela nd Penny for your fantastic organisation! Well said Janet!
Jane
03:31:20
YES
Elaine W
03:31:22
Lots of feedback
janwhite
03:31:23
Jan White signing in