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Blending the QFT and the TPS Analysis Tool - Shared screen with speaker view
Kimberley Sergent
24:34
Hello friends!
Karen Ambrose
25:02
Karen from Greenville, SC
Linda Epps
25:02
Linda Epps, NJ
Nadra Shami
25:09
Nadra - MI
Heidi Ziemer
25:11
Heidi Ziemer from WNYLRC in Buffalo, NY - Hi all!
Lisa McAllister
25:12
Lisa McAllister - Portsmouth, NH
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
25:15
Gabrielle Tripuzzi, CT
Brad Hodapp
25:16
Brad Hodapp, Springfield, IL
Jill Cohen
25:16
Jill Cohen: Mount Desert Island, Maine
Madeline Ruiz
25:16
Madeline from NY
Rebecca Marsick
25:20
Hi all - Rebecca from CT
Caylyn Lemaster
25:20
Caylyn Lemaster, Ashland, KY
Alicia Lorenzo
25:21
Alicia Lorenzo, CT
Caylyn Lemaster
25:27
Hello
Janny Diaz
25:33
Janny Diaz - Bronx, NY
Barbara Lazar
25:46
Barb Lazar from the Land of Enchantment - Albuquerque, New Mexico
Peter Blankfield
25:56
Greetings from Tucson AZ.
Peter Blankfield
26:26
Ms. Lazar, I went to hs not far from you in Belen.
Anne Rose Dueñas
26:33
Good afternoon from San Mateo, CA.
Mary Johnson
26:54
Hi everyone! Mary from CO. I have double booked webinars, so I may not make much sense!
Jason Scoles
26:59
Jason Scoles from Santiago, Chile. Advanced Inquiry program coordinator
Barbara Lazar
27:04
@Peter — Belen is beautiful!
Alexa Sorden
27:11
Alexa NYC
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
27:11
Gabrielle, CT, 8th grade Social Studies
Peter Blankfield
27:24
I am the K-12 Social Studies Content Specialist and Professional Development Academic Trainer for my district.
Rebecca Marsick
27:54
I am a secondary literacy coach at the high school in my district
Jill Cohen
28:15
I am an administrator for our virtual academy program, Instructional Coach (K-12), and RTI/Assessment Coordinator
Madeline Ruiz
28:24
Madeline- 4th grade science teacher
Peter Blankfield
28:31
@Barbara it has its positive aspects.
Deneen Folkmire
28:39
1
Jason Scoles
28:39
1
Linda Epps
28:40
1
Rebecca Marsick
28:40
1
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
28:40
1
Janny Diaz
28:40
My name is Jenny Diaz. I am joining from Bronx, NY I teach ELA and SS.
Jill Cohen
28:41
1
Peter Blankfield
28:42
1
Lisa McAllister
28:42
1
Brad Hodapp
28:42
1
Natalie Odierna
28:43
1
David Kaye
28:43
1
Mary Johnson
28:44
1+
Caylyn Lemaster
28:44
1
Diane Fight
28:45
1
Alexa Sorden
28:47
1
Karen Ambrose
28:47
1
Heidi Ziemer
28:48
1
Mary Devane
28:48
1
Nadra Shami
28:49
1
Alexa Sorden
28:54
1
Mary Devane
28:54
love qft
Barbara Lazar
29:10
1
Barbara Lazar
29:20
2
Diane Fight
29:21
2
Jill Cohen
29:21
2
Heidi Ziemer
29:22
2
Karen Ambrose
29:23
2
Brad Hodapp
29:23
2
Mary Johnson
29:26
1
Rebecca Marsick
29:30
2
Kimberley Sergent
29:30
2
Peter Blankfield
29:31
2
Mary Devane
29:34
don't know that
Lisa McAllister
29:36
2
Mary Johnson
29:38
2
Jason Scoles
29:40
1.5 (seen it in a training with Kathy Swan) but haven’t done anything with it
Deneen Folkmire
32:29
What age are the students?
Jason Scoles
32:30
When was this photo taken?
Jill Cohen
32:30
How has our definition of open classrooms changed?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
32:33
Why is the class open air?
Linda Epps
32:35
Why are the windows open?
Diane Fight
32:37
How old are the students?
Lisa McAllister
32:37
why are the kids so young and thin looking?
Peter Blankfield
32:37
How did this impact student health and welfare?
Barbara Lazar
32:37
When was this?
Mary Devane
32:38
What year is this? Is this during the Pandemic of 1918?
Caylyn Lemaster
32:38
What is on the board?
Alexa Sorden
32:40
What year is this?
Lisa McAllister
32:42
are they sick?
Karen Ambrose
32:42
What is the purpose of the classroom being open air?
Heidi Ziemer
32:42
is this a tuberculosis hospital?
Mary Johnson
32:43
Why are the windows open?
Dianne Jamieson-Noel
32:44
What is the purpose of an one air class?
Brad Hodapp
32:44
Was this b/c of no child labor standards?
Alexa Sorden
32:45
Where is located?
Shuli Lamden
32:45
Why was it open air--Spanish Flu?
Anne Rose Dueñas
32:46
Why are these kids sleeping?
Rebecca Marsick
32:46
IS this from the Spanish flu epidemic?
Jill Cohen
32:47
Is this indicative of all schools at that time?
Alexa Sorden
32:51
Where are the adults?
Heidi Ziemer
32:52
are these immigrant children?
Natalie Odierna
32:52
What does open air mean back then versus now?
Barbara Lazar
32:53
How old are the kids?
Nestora Salcedo
32:54
Is it the time to sleep?
Alexa Sorden
32:55
Where is the teacher?
David Kaye
32:56
Are these students all the same age?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
32:56
where are the desks?
Deneen Folkmire
32:56
What are they laying in?
Barbara Lazar
32:59
Was this during 1918?
Linda Epps
32:59
Are the student cold?
Alicia Lorenzo
33:00
Do they teach in the same place?
Caylyn Lemaster
33:01
Is this similar to our pandemic?
Heidi Ziemer
33:02
why are they all wearing hats?
Jill Cohen
33:04
Was the school being used for other purposes?
Nadra Shami
33:05
Are they napping ?
Linda Epps
33:09
WHy
Rebecca Marsick
33:12
Why does the room look sunken?
Alexa Sorden
33:12
Why are they all wearing hats?
Madeline Ruiz
33:15
why was this picture taken?
Jill Cohen
33:15
Where are girls?
Heidi Ziemer
33:19
are the children sick?
Rebecca Marsick
33:20
where are the desks?
Shuli Lamden
33:20
What are students' socioeconomic status?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
33:21
are they required to sleep?
Christine Diaz
33:22
are they quarantined
Christine Diaz
33:23
?
Caylyn Lemaster
33:23
How did the open air class affect Public School 51?
Barbara Lazar
33:24
Is this a group home?
Barbara Lazar
33:34
How old? Boys and girls?
Ted Demura-Devore
33:34
What is a rest hour?
Jill Cohen
33:41
Why is it called “rest hour” and what does this say about a school day?
Heidi Ziemer
33:47
is this building still there?
Shuli Lamden
33:57
What are the hats and blankets? Who made them?
Brad Hodapp
34:02
Was this on the Lower East Side?
Jill Cohen
34:03
Where are the adults?
Lisa McAllister
34:04
do these kids have TB? did this strategy help?
Karen Ambrose
34:05
Did the open air help prevent contraction of TB?
Diane Fight
34:05
Do the students stay at the school all the time?
Heidi Ziemer
34:07
how long did the schools practice this?
Barbara Lazar
34:11
All the windows?
David Kaye
34:12
Why did only some cities adopt open-air schools?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
34:13
do they sleep there over night?
Jason Scoles
34:13
How serious was the TB outbreak in ’04-05?
Edward Gold
34:15
How successful was this strategy
Peter Blankfield
34:15
How does this help prevent transmission?
Anne Rose Dueñas
34:16
Why was there a rest area? Did these children have TB?
Janny Diaz
34:17
Why was it preferred that they be in school?
Karen Ambrose
34:19
Do the students live here?
Mary Devane
34:19
Did open air schools work? Did children get better? Did they learn?
Heidi Ziemer
34:20
what about their families?
Deneen Folkmire
34:20
Did this happen in all school?
Shuli Lamden
34:22
What part of new york?
Diane Fight
34:23
Which cities?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
34:24
did all schools operate like this?
Natalie Odierna
34:31
How long did this strategy last for?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
34:31
Was this a requirement?
Deneen Folkmire
34:31
Where are the teachers
Caylyn Lemaster
34:32
Did our schools get the idea of opening our windows in school during Covid-19 from this?
Linda Epps
34:33
Is it is a segrated school?
Shuli Lamden
34:34
where is the teacher?
Ted Demura-Devore
34:37
Are these residents?
Janny Diaz
34:40
Is this a public school?
Karen Ambrose
34:41
Are they resting because they are sick?
Linda Epps
34:49
Are they quarintined?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
34:51
are they resting because they are preventing TB?
Dianne Jamieson-Noel
34:51
Where are the teachers?
Madeline Ruiz
35:01
How is this procedure helping the outbreak?
Jill Cohen
35:10
What were the conceptions of health and wellness and what achieves this during this time?
Deneen Folkmire
35:11
What is written on the board
Linda Epps
35:11
What happened in the winter?
Rebecca Marsick
35:11
Why are the kids still so close together?
Shuli Lamden
35:17
what proportion of time was "rest time"?
Alicia Lorenzo
35:31
Was this successful?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
35:32
how cold is it?
Deneen Folkmire
35:33
What was the standard for Care
Barbara Lazar
35:38
Was there a sense of healing — or prevention — from this?
Ted Demura-Devore
35:57
How many f these were there around the city?
Brad Hodapp
36:33
Was the Tuberculosis Outbreak due to lack of sanitization in NYC?
Alicia Lorenzo
36:37
Was this type treatment mirrored during Covid?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
36:43
How was this procedure's effectiveness measured and by whom?
Jill Cohen
36:50
In what ways were there different responses to this outbreak for children versus adults?
Heidi Ziemer
36:50
what is the gender of these children?
Barbara Lazar
37:02
What do students do the rest of the “school” day?
Diane Fight
37:04
Was this voluntary?
Karen Ambrose
37:05
Did this practice produce positive results in preventing or curing TB?
Mary Johnson
37:07
Who were the front line workers?
Alexa Sorden
37:08
What role did the school play in housing these children?
Lisa McAllister
37:14
How did this practice affect more modern practices with outbreaks of illnesses?
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
37:16
Was this procedure a preventative measure or reactionary?
Edward Gold
37:17
What was the thinking at that time about TB transmission?
Jill Cohen
37:20
What lessons have we learned about the role of schools and public health that are being addressed today?
Caylyn Lemaster
37:21
Why was this strategy thought to be effective in preventing TB?
Jason Scoles
37:22
How did the daily infections rate change after implementation of open-aired classrooms?
Chris Sprouse
37:25
If the school was segregated, were schools for other groups of kids experiencing the same thing?
Heidi Ziemer
37:27
who took this photo?
Madeline Ruiz
37:28
what data was obtained from this response?
Rebecca Marsick
37:33
What did scientists learn from this practice about how to handle outbreaks?
Alexa Sorden
37:36
How was the city providing the children with an adequate educational learning experience?
Karen Ambrose
37:38
What other practices were used to treat or prevent TB?
Anne Rose Dueñas
37:39
Adapting Heidi Ziemer’s question: Did the school provide hats and blankets to all children?
Ted Demura-Devore
37:40
Did this happen throughout the city or was it more n high immigrant areas?
Shuli Lamden
37:40
How firm were TB diagnoses and what were cures?
Dianne Jamieson-Noel
37:43
What are the differences between this intervention and what is happening in Covid?
Nestora Salcedo
37:50
Is this in winter time?
Barbara Lazar
37:59
How effective was this? Many people were sent to NM to recover from TB during this time….
Mary Johnson
38:02
How and when was a cure discovered?
Deneen Folkmire
38:14
Was this initiated by the government?
Linda Epps
38:33
Was this done because of a panic?
Dianne Jamieson-Noel
38:42
What’s the impact of this practice on the psychological and mental well being of the children?
Janny Diaz
38:44
What was the public’s response to this practice?
Barbara Lazar
38:51
Why was this photo taken — for whom was this image intended?
Natalie Odierna
38:52
Did this photo help to handle outbreaks of the Spanish flu?
Ted Demura-Devore
38:52
Was this this more about treatment or segregation?
Barbara Lazar
40:08
What were the differences in TB transmission between adults and children?
Karen Ambrose
40:25
I don't see the usual mute options.
Barbara Lazar
40:38
Ask people to raise hand?
Jason Scoles
40:39
you could ask us to ‘raise hand’ and then provide permission to unmute from the participants list
David Kaye
40:45
(I think because this is a Zoom Webinar, as opposed to a Zoom Meeting, participants can’t unmute themselves.)
Jill Cohen
40:47
I don’t either?
Heidi Ziemer
40:52
My 3 questions: who took this photo? Was the photo used for a specific purpose? Are there more photos like this?
Barbara Lazar
42:30
@ Heid — I like....
Anne Rose Dueñas
42:45
3 Q’s: Karen’s Q’s-What other practices were used to treat or prevent TB? Gabrielle’s Q’s-Was this procedure a preventative measure or reactionary? Jason’s Q’s-How did the daily infections rate change after implementation of open-aired classrooms?
Shuli Lamden
44:10
What are schools' responsibilities balancing students' health & learning?
Mary Devane
45:08
What is the science behind this strategy? Did it work? How can we learn from this today with COVID?
Mary Johnson
45:12
I really like the second part of the prioritization process in which you asked us to “think about why you chose those questions.”
Caylyn Lemaster
45:48
I also liked the question about how the data was collected. That is one thing that I feel that we can connect to Covid as well because there has been a lot of talk about accurate data when discussing Covid.
Lisa McAllister
47:09
the children look sick
Heidi Ziemer
47:10
how small the children seem
Karen Ambrose
47:11
The children look so young and all have on hats
Barbara Lazar
47:11
These look like deck chairs?!
Natalie Odierna
47:12
Age of the children
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
47:13
the types of chairs they are laying on- look like outdoor patio furniture
Natalie Odierna
47:16
How vulnerable they look
Jill Cohen
47:17
No adults
David Kaye
47:17
high ceilings
Linda Epps
47:18
All of the students are sleeping.
Caylyn Lemaster
47:19
The hats and covers
Mary Devane
47:20
the lounge chairs, the writing on the blackboard
Deneen Folkmire
47:22
That they are bundled up with the windows opened
Diane Fight
47:22
How bundled up the kids are. They look like they are freezing
Natalie Odierna
47:23
Size of room versus size of children
Edward Gold
47:24
SO young and so cool
Shuli Lamden
47:25
I'm struck by the standardization.
Alicia Lorenzo
47:25
That the children are wearing hats?
Edward Gold
47:27
cold
Ted Demura-Devore
47:31
The size of the room, the high ceilings, the spacing of the buildings out the window.
Jason Scoles
47:31
The uniformity of chairs, hats, etc
Karen Ambrose
47:32
There is writing on the board and no desks facing the board
Mary Devane
47:38
windows
Ted Demura-Devore
47:52
It is in Manhattan.
Linda Epps
47:52
Are they staged for this picture?
Caylyn Lemaster
47:56
The only desks you can see are moved over against the wall.
Nestora Salcedo
48:12
Nap time
Deneen Folkmire
48:19
Preventative
Karen Ambrose
48:20
I think it is a reaction based on the practice of TB camps during this time
Ted Demura-Devore
48:28
I don’t see desks, just the lounge chairs.
Jason Scoles
48:35
reactionary to prevent as my spider senses tell me they were trying to fight the TB outbreak
Alicia Lorenzo
48:49
Is the classroom being used temporary for a place to rest?
Barbara Lazar
49:30
The uniformity makes me think it has been thought out — the caption does say it is “a response” — they don’t look super healthy, but maybe they are resting—
Linda Epps
49:47
Is this an orphan?
Ted Demura-Devore
49:53
He many kids went to school at this point?
Barbara Lazar
49:56
Modern standards— what kids would be in a “school” versus
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
49:57
I am still wondering where the desks are and it makes me question the value placed on learning, the role of schools
Barbara Lazar
50:15
Worker kids… propaganda does come to mind...
Caylyn Lemaster
50:20
I would think reactionary because it says that it was as a response to an outbreak of TB
Heidi Ziemer
50:21
Looks like the title ("open air class...") is on one of the boards - so likely staged - perhaps is to show others how to prevent outbreaks of tuberculosis - especially in tenement housing, likely the case in Manhattan at this time
Mary Johnson
50:32
I’m thinking that schools, no matter the time period, are trying to do the best they can with whatever information they have.
Linda Epps
50:39
Adults
Barbara Lazar
50:43
Don’t see adults, no desks
Natalie Odierna
50:57
No adults
Caylyn Lemaster
50:59
No school supplies
Jason Scoles
51:01
no masks
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
51:02
what was the purpose of taking this photo?
Natalie Odierna
51:06
Makes me wonder if this is a classroom now used for medical purposes
Heidi Ziemer
51:50
overcrowded housing in cities leading to outbreaks of illness
Diane Fight
51:53
very populated cities
Anne Rose Dueñas
51:57
Perhaps this was a standard procedure in New York because it was densely populated?
Janny Diaz
51:59
poverty stricken areas
Barbara Lazar
52:05
This is actually probably a small class— fewer than 20 kids? Does not match the “overcrowding”
Caylyn Lemaster
52:07
Crowded cities
Karen Ambrose
52:20
Factory workers also contracted TB from breathing in cotton fibers
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
52:36
cities=progressive=trying new techniques?
Jason Scoles
54:25
I’d like to look into the evolution of outbreak response (historical sense)
Deneen Folkmire
54:33
I would do further research about the time period and what else was going on. What did school look like at that time in history?
Brad Hodapp
54:40
Research the picture by the info given.
Heidi Ziemer
55:15
I still would like to know answers to the three questions I listed - my hunch is these may be Lewis Wickes Hine images - would try the Library of Congress website! That might help answer "why was this photo taken"
Jill Cohen
55:17
I would go to additional primary sources that were more textual for point of view for possible theories as to the answers
Mary Johnson
55:25
If I wanted students to learn about tuberculosis, I’d be tempted to circle back with a question focus statement and restart the QFT.
Karen Ambrose
55:25
I would like to look into more context about this period of time and methods of preventing illness
Barbara Lazar
55:26
(My next step may depend on what my own essential question for my lesson/purpose is — why am I using this to begin with? Is this a science class? A social studies class?
Caylyn Lemaster
55:53
I would like to find articles from that time period to help me answer some of the questions from that time period. Then, I would like to look for articles explaining the effect on more modern practices.
Sarah Westbrook
56:02
@Barbara excellent point about objective
Mary Devane
57:36
were classes typically separated by gender
Lisa McAllister
57:37
These other pictures make me feel like the original one is less about the TB response and more about just general classroom management approaches, or the evolution of schooling over time.
Rebecca Marsick
57:40
Wasn’t there a movement for open air schools in places like CA?
Barbara Lazar
57:45
It is like the “forest schools” of today
Heidi Ziemer
58:06
At first, I thought the images might have been from Catholic schools because of the persistent images of Mary and Jesus in several of them - but maybe that is just to signify the value of children?
Barbara Lazar
58:13
They were onto something, no?!
Mary Johnson
58:20
I would try to find newspaper articles through using the search term “open air schools” and limiting my search to the time period of the photos.
Ted Demura-Devore
58:46
In most of the pictures the students are in individual seats, but not at Tuskegee.
Kimberley Sergent
59:09
I noticed that.
Barbara Lazar
59:12
Woah!!!!
Kimberley Sergent
59:20
That is Raphael’s Madonna and Child.
Alicia Lorenzo
59:27
That's what I thought!
Karen Ambrose
59:57
So when did everyone put George Washington photos in the classrooms?
Nestora Salcedo
01:01:09
The image gives the message of caring, love, linked with education?…
Mary Johnson
01:01:14
Two children - Jesus and his cousin, John the Baptist?
Ted Demura-Devore
01:01:19
I first thought it was Grant.
Alicia Lorenzo
01:02:11
The working picture reminds me of my father in law who is 94 and he told me he embroidered hankerchief at school. So I wonder if that's what the building in school was about?
Caylyn Lemaster
01:02:35
Did anyone else notice how close the students at Tuskegee Institute are sitting? Does this represent the value of children of different races? Was the open- air classroom an option for children of all races?
Lisa McAllister
01:03:07
Sorry - I have to run-I have another meeting at 4:45 - thanks so much. This was fun!
Ted Demura-Devore
01:03:23
This is summer is that different?
Shuli Lamden
01:04:07
I learned about the "open air school"
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
01:04:15
I learned that I don't have to implement 1 questioning technique in isolation- all of these techniques can be blended together to generate higher level critical thinking
Deneen Folkmire
01:04:16
How showing a primary source can be so thought provoking and how many different questions it can create
Linda Epps
01:04:18
Continue to require teachers to take deep dives when questioning?
Anne Rose Dueñas
01:04:20
I learned that observing primary sources as just as valuable as “finding the answer” to what that primary source was actually about because it allowed me to draw inferences and look at the primary source more closely.
Ted Demura-Devore
01:04:49
I typically ask for observations and then go to meaning, focusing on the questions brings out more, I think.
Edward Gold
01:04:53
Great value in having the students formulate the questions
Karen Ambrose
01:04:58
I think teachers do not realize how much students can learn from asking questions and analyzing only one source.
Rebecca Marsick
01:05:13
Makes me think about how important it is to choose the best sources
Madeline Ruiz
01:05:15
how teaching needs to be question driven. Allow students to ask questions and formulate new ones.
Diane Fight
01:05:16
I want to use more primary resources with students in general to stimulate thinking and questioning
Heidi Ziemer
01:05:17
There is a tendency to try and draw parallels between the past and present
Barbara Lazar
01:05:23
I (re)learned the power of an image…and that an historical image can have profound relevance for today
Deneen Folkmire
01:05:25
How important it is to teach students to ask questions. To create that inquiry and curiosity
Dianne Jamieson-Noel
01:05:29
This is a great way to prompt students to think. This has been been a great experience to see the technique in action. Great way to expand thinking.
Shuli Lamden
01:06:09
sequencing steps in thinking, questioning, prioritizing, researching
Caylyn Lemaster
01:06:27
Connecting the QFT and the TPS Analysis Tool puts students in the driver seat of their own learning.
Karen Ambrose
01:06:35
FYI- I think the image of the woman with two children at the Tuskegee Institute could be a photo from the Port Royal Experiment (first schools for former enslaved children in the South)
Edward Gold
01:07:28
Thank you so much for this opportunity! I’m heading into another zoom!
Deneen Folkmire
01:09:18
The sequence worked well for me. I am still curious about the TPS tool
Caylyn Lemaster
01:10:18
The layering in of captions and photos encouraged more inquiry and questioning. The sequence of today's activity encouraged deeper inquiry.
Anne Rose Dueñas
01:11:41
This might not be a relevant question, but I want to know how to encourage students to conduct research/further investigation after conducting the QFT with primary sources.
Caylyn Lemaster
01:11:48
This promotes "discovery learning."
Heidi Ziemer
01:12:40
I agree about the TPS tool - but I do think the "reflection" section often amounted to questioning - I prefer the QFT model, and especially like when we are asked to change open-ended questions to closed questions and vice versa - shows students that some questions lead to deeper understanding - and different ways to collect information
Caylyn Lemaster
01:12:43
I'm excited to merge the two strategies in my classroom!
Karen Ambrose
01:12:44
Are you willing to share this presentation at least in view mode?
Karen Ambrose
01:13:25
Thank you!
Kimberley Sergent
01:14:13
Thank you! This has been great.
Linda Epps
01:14:42
Thank you for this opportunity. New ideas have emerged for me to share with my teachers.
Ted Demura-Devore
01:14:46
Thank you.
Caylyn Lemaster
01:14:51
Thank you!
Shuli Lamden
01:14:58
Thank you!
Jason Scoles
01:14:59
Thank you!
Karen Ambrose
01:14:59
Same to you two!
Gabrielle Tripuzzi
01:15:00
Thank you so much!!
Anne Rose Dueñas
01:15:04
Thank you!
Heidi Ziemer
01:15:06
Thank you!
Barbara Lazar
01:15:10
thanks
Madeline Ruiz
01:15:15
I like how it is question driven which promotes thinking but also throughout the process reveals knowledge. AS the questions continued I noticed some questions were answered and other were used to further investigate. This promotes a learning cycle of discovery, curiosity and growth.
Mary Johnson
01:15:26
I’m a groupie, I know, but thank you as alway!
Nestora Salcedo
01:15:26
Thank you very much