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Supporting Student's Mathematical Reasoning with the Mathematical Practices Part 2 - Shared screen with speaker view
Chris
35:12
Chris Conder from Juneau here
maryann.love
35:46
MaryAnn from Juneau here.
Elizabeth Ross
36:30
Beth from Fairbanks
Diana Kurka
36:45
Thanks for checking in! I’m seeing names in the participant list too.
Jerry White Bethel
37:37
17
Christina Webster
37:43
17?
Elizabeth Ross
37:55
10?
Lila
38:28
17
Michael Hanson
38:33
17
Erin Carriker
38:55
erin c here from Juneau
Chris
39:29
i'm thinking 15
Elizabeth Ross
40:19
OK. I changed my thinking. Maybe 17?
Jerry White Bethel
42:07
I think that is a Bethel taxi way of thinking.
Elizabeth Ross
42:13
OH because you can’t have an adult and a child in the boat!
Andrea Colvin
42:29
It would still be four trips for each adult
Stephanie Richardson
43:20
It is always the number of adults times 4 and add one trip
Andrea Colvin
43:27
(n x 4) + 1 = trips
Max Pananen
43:28
n*4+1, n=adults
f202593
43:52
Sorry I joined late. The emails keep going to junk mail. I will join the conversation as soon as I figure out what’s happening.
Melissa Crane
44:36
Resource Page: https://asdn.org/webinar-resource-page-supporting-students-mathematical-reasoning-fall-2019/
f202593
46:16
Just found the bookmark. Thanks.
Christina Webster
47:00
what is the bookmark labeled as in our handouts?
Andrea Colvin
47:11
1-3: I immediately started drawing a picture to solve this problem. I personally couldn't analyze it in my head and needed to visually represent the problem. I also had a moment of wanting objects to solve the problem.
f202593
48:11
I love that protocol and I’ve been using it with my special ed students in the general classroom. So powerful. At first, they could not tell me what the story was about because they had never thought about story problems as actual stories before!
Lila
49:34
I also had to draw a picture right away. I use just a brief sketch to help clear it up in my head.
f202593
49:38
This is Abigail. I am now calling their drawings a story board now and they are connecting math and life for the first time.
f202593
50:19
Abigail: I am phrasing things by saying that all math tells a story.
Diana Kurka
50:25
You should find the handout in the Zip drive for Macs -Math Practices Bookmark
Stephanie Richardson
51:20
I definitely have to revise my thinking as I hear other information and/or realize I’ve gone down the wrong path.
Christina Webster
52:20
3-Reads!
Jerry White Bethel
53:02
The handout zip is still empty.
Melissa Crane
53:08
This URL works https://asdn.org/webinar-resource-page-supporting-students-mathematical-reasoning-fall-2019/
Christina Webster
53:13
We’ve been doing them ever since last class, I feel like I’m finally making progress with my kids. They love when they get to tell me all the different questions they are able to answer with that information aside from the task they are actually asked to find.
Tennessee
53:35
Same with my handout zip file. It says it is empty.
Lila
53:38
I have tried 3 reads with my 1st and 2nd grade students this week, once time in each class. I intend to use it more! At first, my students did not really know what to think, but by the end, they were so excited that they could come up with their own question. They asked a few different questions. Some of them made sense, some of them we worked on.
Christina Webster
54:04
For example they need to give me an expression that represents something, but along with that they tell me all the other basic and higher level questions they have enough information to solve or create an expression for.
f202593
54:05
Abigail: I have tried three reads working one:one with a sped student in the 4th grade math class. It has been amazing for that student. He now understands for the first time that it REALLY is a story and he can use a strategy that allows him to revise his story board representation as he moves along.
Lila
54:11
I could download the Mac zipfile, not the other one. Ironically, I am logged in on a DELL. Maybe try both.
Christina Webster
54:20
I also have my students work in groups for their 3-reads without me facilitating
Elizabeth Ross
54:22
I have used numberless problems. I ask the kids what they want to ask…I have a few kids that keep asking for the numbers over and over
Lisa Varner
54:34
I tried the 3 Reads for division stories where students had to interpret remainders. It was so helpful in leading students to understand what to do with the remainders.
Melissa Crane
54:39
PC download link: https://asdn.org/wp-content/uploads/New-folder.zip
Melissa Crane
55:06
MAC Download Link: https://asdn.org/wp-content/uploads/Webinar-2-Handouts-1.zip
Tennessee
55:07
I am on a MAC and had to download the PC folder. They must be reversed. It worked though!
Lila
55:46
I used mine with addition and subtraction. 1st grade just small numbers under 5. My kiddos are intervention. 2nd grade, I used numbers under 10. I wanted the kids to feel really comfortable manipulating the numbers since it was our first time.
maryann.love
56:06
It took a bit of practice on my part to train my teacher brain. I am teaching kindergarten so I still feel story problems for some are over their heads. I have tried it with my 2nd grader and it was helpful.
f202593
56:16
The problems I’ve used three reads with so far involve multiplication and addition. He is drawing and labeling pictures. It has helped me to really relax and open up my mind to adjusting strategies in the middle of working on the problem.
Elizabeth Ross
57:52
So I typed before that the kids kept asking for numbers.
f202593
57:52
Oh, I’ve tried using simpler numbers with my students before. Good reminder.
Stephanie Richardson
57:59
I’ve used the numberless word problems, and have found the students are more engaged and interested in the content. They have also been coming up with wonders as we go along, and usually they end up asking the question I want them to answer.
Elizabeth Ross
58:25
I like the idea of them using numbers they are more comfortable with
Rafe
58:31
Hello everyone! I just got out of our staff meeting!!
Lisa Varner
59:51
I used the Part Part Whole model extensively. I also use that model for Larger Smaller Difference (Comparison) problems.
Jennifer Bleicher
01:01:18
P.I.C.S. I have used P.I.C.S. in my intervention math class. Students are actually creating their own situation with digits provided for them. They understand why the concept is important when learning a mathematical concept.
Elizabeth Ross
01:05:25
I was like huh? But them I started drawing and finding the fractional parts..
Andrea Colvin
01:05:26
48?
Stephanie Richardson
01:05:27
I’m gong to say 48
Tennessee
01:05:28
48
Christina Webster
01:06:52
Yep 48
Lisa Varner
01:08:01
#2?
Stephanie Richardson
01:08:04
I’m missing some of the comments. Can we make sure that everyone has the “all panelists and attendees” clicked in the chat box?
Michael Hanson
01:08:06
2
f202593
01:08:12
I think #2
Christina Webster
01:08:18
2
Tennessee
01:08:20
2
Polly Rowell
01:08:23
2
Jerry White Bethel
01:08:30
2
f202593
01:10:17
8.1
Chris
01:10:22
8.2 liters?
Michael Hanson
01:10:29
8.1
Christina Webster
01:10:36
8.1
Stephanie Richardson
01:10:39
8.4 liters
Jennifer Bleicher
01:10:43
8.1
Chris
01:10:44
sorry 8.1
Andrea Colvin
01:10:47
8.1
Lila
01:10:49
8.1
Michael Hanson
01:11:11
7
Tennessee
01:11:23
7
f202593
01:11:27
7
Elizabeth Ross
01:11:28
Well I’m still lost solving the problem
Elizabeth Ross
01:13:20
I guess there is where 3 reads could help as I thought the 4/5 was equal to 40.5
Christina Webster
01:16:24
4 X 4…28?
f202593
01:16:28
21 as long as the squares aren’t allowed to overlap?
Christina Webster
01:17:07
30?
Max Pananen
01:17:09
30?
Tennessee
01:17:40
30
Chris
01:17:43
30
Andrea Colvin
01:17:43
`square numbers
Polly Rowell
01:17:47
30
Polly Rowell
01:18:57
7
Lisa Varner
01:18:58
#7 Look for patterns
f202593
01:19:03
7
Michael Hanson
01:19:06
7
Lila
01:19:07
I think 2 or 7
Christina Webster
01:19:07
8
maryann.love
01:19:07
7
Tennessee
01:19:10
8
Stephanie Richardson
01:19:13
8
Tennessee
01:19:17
Repeated calculations?
Polly Rowell
01:19:19
8
Elizabeth Ross
01:20:49
5 8
Lisa Varner
01:20:55
4, 7
Michael Hanson
01:20:57
4,7
Stephanie Richardson
01:21:01
1,4
Andrea Colvin
01:21:02
s=0 t=3
Jennifer Bleicher
01:21:04
4,7
Polly Rowell
01:21:05
0, 3
Lila
01:21:06
1, 4
maryann.love
01:21:21
1, 4
f202593
01:21:26
As soon as you get high enough to add to 10
Tennessee
01:21:31
you’re adding 3 to the triangle number
Tennessee
01:21:35
?
maryann.love
01:21:36
adding 3
Elizabeth Ross
01:21:42
Difference of 3 between them
Christina Webster
01:22:04
Because one side had 10 and the other only has 7
Lisa Varner
01:22:05
because 10 is 3 more than 7
Elizabeth Ross
01:22:21
as the square increases by 1, the triangle increases by 1
Christina Webster
01:23:04
7
Polly Rowell
01:23:12
7
Christina Webster
01:23:17
How is one side related to the other
f202593
01:23:21
8
Michael Hanson
01:23:25
2
Stephanie Richardson
01:23:28
It seems like a little of all because we have to reason with numbers, know how equations work, and explore patterns that would help us find more possible answers.
f202593
01:23:28
7 also
Lisa Varner
01:23:31
8
Tennessee
01:23:32
7
Andrea Colvin
01:23:35
2
Elizabeth Ross
01:23:42
7
Polly Rowell
01:24:49
I wouldn't have seen the pattern if others hadn't been contributing.
f202593
01:24:50
It’s funny that I originally thought the number we were replacing the square and triangle with had to be the same.
Elizabeth Ross
01:25:38
I wondered if the number should be the same also!
f202593
01:27:50
Ask what is changing and what is staying the same
Stephanie Richardson
01:27:57
It seems we would need to have more than one problem and/or scenario so students could see a pattern in their answers
Christina Webster
01:28:06
Come up with a way to solve this problem that we could apply/use for a similar problem
Elizabeth Ross
01:28:14
So make the 19 a 20 and the 15 a 14 to do mental math?
Tennessee
01:28:26
I was thinking that too. Add more depth
Tennessee
01:29:30
What about if they were to trade a certain number of cars, how many did they leave with
f202593
01:30:19
There’s a fun strategy for mental math called pretend-a-ten too
f202593
01:33:33
Finding a shortcut
Stephanie Richardson
01:33:33
Again, we’d need another question/problem
f202593
01:33:51
#8…finding a shortcut
Christina Webster
01:34:01
What changes as we stack the cones? I.E. what part grows the stack and what part is hidden as we stack it.
Max Pananen
01:34:15
Yes to the shortcut, recognize there will be nesting
Polly Rowell
01:34:18
Break it down into smaller groups.
Elizabeth Ross
01:36:17
I totally didn’t think of the bottom part not having a value when they were stacked/nested in each other!
Lila
01:36:34
I didn't think of that either!
Stephanie Richardson
01:36:35
Ask them to draw a model or picture to prove their thinking
Tennessee
01:36:52
Creating a formula to solve?
f202593
01:37:27
Physical modeling
Tennessee
01:38:10
no
Elizabeth Ross
01:38:14
no
f202593
01:38:15
No
Lila
01:38:18
no
Diana Kurka
01:40:46
This is one of the options for the discussion questions for this webinar if you are taking the webinar for credit.
Rafe
01:45:00
They will need to read A very carefully
Andrea Colvin
01:45:06
Who can drive the van?
Michael Hanson
01:45:35
what strategies might you try?
Chris
01:45:37
how many people total with 3 reads
Elizabeth Ross
01:45:43
Do you really have to do any division?
Tennessee
01:45:54
Does each van need to be full with people
Tennessee
01:45:55
?
Lisa Varner
01:46:03
What representation or graphic organizer can help you model the problem?
Tennessee
01:46:07
I was just thinking about the remainder
Rafe
01:46:11
They could draw a picture
Lisa Varner
01:46:50
How can you represent the problem with symbols and numbers? What is your division problem?
Tennessee
01:46:51
Tie them to the roof
Tennessee
01:46:52
LOL
Lisa Varner
01:46:58
What do you do with the extra people?
e02228
01:47:13
How could I represent this problem using symbols?
Lisa Varner
01:47:50
What representation or graphic organizer can help you model this problem?
f202593
01:47:52
How can you use a bar model or part-part whole model to show this problem?
Stephanie Richardson
01:48:02
How many different ways can you solve the problem? Are any of your strategies like others’?
Christina Webster
01:48:30
I would ask my students where they might see this in the real world? Create a situation where you might find this problem.
Lisa Varner
01:48:35
Can you write a story to match this problem?
f202593
01:48:38
Could you use more than one kind of math operation to solve this?
Polly Rowell
01:49:18
What generalization can you make based on your solving of the problem?
Elizabeth Ross
01:49:25
I was thinking breaking apart 1.5 or rounding to 2 and then subtracting. So solving the problem in another way
f202593
01:49:38
Through your class, I have been reminded that all math tells a story.
Elizabeth Ross
01:50:03
Patterns! LOL
f202593
01:50:14
Just because you don’t have an assignment for the number, it’s still telling a story.
f202593
01:50:46
This makes math so much more exciting!
Lisa Varner
01:53:36
What pattern do you notice?
f202593
01:53:48
When might you use this rule/pattern?
Michael Hanson
01:54:50
why is this important to the problem?
Elizabeth Ross
01:55:52
I want to pull out cubes!
Lisa Varner
01:57:10
How can you use the pattern to figure out the answer without using blocks?
Christina Webster
01:57:48
For my middle schoolers, I’d love to give them pattern blocks to use, but not enough of them. So they get 6 of them but they can use those 6 to try and expand and envision what happens with that perimeter.
f202593
01:57:52
Can you think of a time when the rule wouldn’t work?
Stephanie Richardson
01:58:09
That’s a great idea, Christina!
Lila
01:59:59
That would be a really fun problem for my 2nd grade intervention class!
Michael Hanson
02:01:18
8
Christina Webster
02:01:18
They’re identifying the pattern for sure
Elizabeth Ross
02:01:35
Using easy numbers to set markers… 8
f202593
02:01:47
2
Andrea Colvin
02:01:49
2
Christina Webster
02:01:52
7
e02228
02:01:52
2
Michael Hanson
02:01:56
2
Stephanie Richardson
02:01:56
2
Christina Webster
02:02:05
…2
f202593
02:02:33
7
Andrea Colvin
02:02:35
7
Stephanie Richardson
02:02:37
7
e02228
02:02:37
7
Melissa Crane
02:04:21
Credit Course Registration Link: http://www.cvent.com/d/yyq3fxResource Page: https://asdn.org/webinar-resource-page-supporting-students-mathematical-reasoning-fall-2019/Survey Link 2: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LBLPYV9
Michael Hanson
02:04:41
This has been really great! At first, I was struggling and wondering if I was going to get it. I am in district administration and do not teach a class. I am feeling much more confident!
Stephanie Richardson
02:04:45
Enhancing these tasks will mean that students are doing fewer problems…but in much more meaningful ways.
f202593
02:04:47
I’m so excited about how much more I am using my imagination and playing while I am working on math with my students now.
Jennifer Bay Williams
02:05:32
Yes, Stephanie!!! That is it…a great example of less is more!
Jennifer Bay Williams
02:06:02
Love the comment f202593...bringing creativity to math!
Jennifer Bay Williams
02:06:33
Michael-love having administrators and so glad you kept solving the tasks!
Diana Kurka
02:07:03
dkurka@alaskaasca.org
Lila
02:07:56
Thank you so much! I love all the new ideas and how much we are opening students' minds by allowing them to build their own questions.
Max Pananen
02:09:46
I like this type of approach to math as it focuses initially less on numbers and more on teaching critical thinking and problem solving skills. Once a student finds a way of thinking the makes sense to them they can solve almost any problem.
Melissa Crane
02:10:27
Survey Link 2: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LBLPYV9
Jennifer Bay Williams
02:10:31
Yes! Exactly - critical thinking!
Jennifer Bay Williams
02:10:57
Thanks, Lila!